(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Echo"

California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 44, No. 9 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks. CA 91 360 


November 12,2003 


Sports 


Features 


News 


CLU soccer closes season with a 
bang. 


Alumni art exhibit is in the Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture. 


Drinking is discouraged on 
campus. 


See story page 7 


See story page 5 


See story page 3 



CLU given $400k for diversity 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran Univer- 
sity community will hold the university's 
second CDI/Campus Diversity Retreat 
on Nov. 21 in Simi Valley, Calif. 

CLU received $400,000 from the 
Irvine Foundation to be spent over three 
years to increase diversity on campus. 

"This [retreat] is to follow up on 
the planning retreat in June," said Delia 
Greenlee, director of Foundation Rela- 
tions and Scholarship Development. 

"The goal of the project," she said, 
"is to implement a comprehensive ap- 
proach to sustainable improvement of 
diversity across the campus community. 
President Luedtke is going to be very 
much involved. 

"At the retreat, everyone will re- 
ceive information on how we're going 
to implement the diversity plan we 
presented to the Irvine Foundation and 
there has been appointed a President's 



Advisory Council on Diversity and In- 
ternationalism. The representation on 
the council cross-cuts all divisions of 
CLU, including Admissions, Student Af- 
fairs, Residence Life, Academic Affairs, 
Administration and Staff and Human 
Resources." 

The Campus Diversity Initiative, 
or CDI, is designed to facilitate institu- 
tional change in two ways. The first is to 
increase demographic diversity among 
students, faculty and administration. 
The second is to enhance the climate for 
diversity through in-depth analysis and 
the curriculum, instead of just offering 
cultural programs, said Director of Mul- 
ticultural and International Programs and 
President's Advisory Council member 
Juanita Pryor Hall. 

Pryor Hall said that faculty members 
can receive grants to infuse diversity in 
the curriculum. 

"We're trying to work on every 
level of campus with students, faculty, 
staff and administration to improve the 



climate on campus for diversity and 
cross-cultural competency among all our 
students," she said. "Our job is to move 
the grant along through re-granting and 
oversight process." 

"The idea is to infuse 
diversity through the 
curriculum." 



Juanita Pryor Hall 

Director of Multicultural and 

International Programs 

"Professors will have the opportu- 
nity to revise the curriculum and peda- 
gogy [and] there will be workshops to 
help them," Pryor Hall said. "The idea 
is to infuse diversity through the cur- 
riculum." 

Pryor Hall said that the retreat is 
open to the CLU community. 

"The retreat is to allow people to 



give input and to give people an op- 
portunity for on-going participation," 
she said. 

Greenlee said that members of the 
council are allocated a certain amount of 
money to implement the diversity plan in 
their respective fields. 

"The mandate of the Irvine Founda- 
tion is to serve the people of California," 
Greenlee said. 

The retreat will start at 8 a.m. with 
breakfast and finish at 3:30 p.m. At- 
tendees will listen to Dr. Edgar Beck- 
ham, senior fellow at the Association of 
American Colleges and Universities; be 
introduced to members of the President's 
Advisory Council; and participate in dis- 
cussion groups related to diversity issues 
at CLU. 

Attendance at the retreat is limited to 
1 30 people and reservations can be made 
with Joan Jedrzejek at ext. 3160 or at 
jedrzeje@clunet.edu. Name, e-mail and 
campus phone numbers are required to 
make reservations. 



Ambassador speaks on free trade 



By Erick Elhard 
Staff Writer 



The Organization of American States 
visited campus last Wednesday in a less 
than traditional way. Courtesy of the 
videoconferencing capabilities available 
in the Spies-Bornemann Center for Edu- 
cation and Technology, representatives 
from the OAS simultaneously conversed 
with students at two universities. 

The OAS was chartered in 1948 and 
is currently composed of 35 nations, 
from North, Central and South America 
and the Caribbean. The OAS is primarily 
concerned with free trade, the trafficking 
of illegal drugs, freedom of speech and 
civil society's involvement in govern- 
ment in the western hemisphere. 

The transnational conference took 
place in Ed-Tech 139 between CLU; the 
OAS, headquartered in Washington D.C.; 
and Denison University in Granville, 
Ohio. It lasted nearly two hours and was 
hosted by CLU Spanish professor Dr. 
Jessica Ramos-Harthun. Three ambassa- 
dors from the OAS spoke and responded 
to questions from the students. 

Ambassador Luigi Einaudi, assistant 
secretary general of the OAS. spoke 
on issues like "governability" and free 
trade. 

"Now that everyone's democratic 
in some form, the question is, how do 
we translate that to day-to-day govern- 
ment and issues like lost jobs? We may 
overlook the negatives like improving 
security and well-being, but they're still 
there," Einaudi said. 

He alluded to the prospect of free 
trade being a tricky proposition and 




Photograph by Sarah Garcia 

With the ambassador on the television screen and the conference on (he projection 
screen, junior Mark Neilsen and senior Robert Boland listen in on the discussion. 



said that negotiations with countries or 
groups of countries are the first steps 
toward progress. 

"The question of free regional trade 
is a fascinating one because it's never 
been done," Einaudi said. 

The ambassador also responded to 
questions about whether relaxed borders 
will increase drug trafficking and illegal 
border crossing. 

"Openness in any area carries with 
it costs, as seen by September 11 ... 
[but] we can't live separate lives like our 
ancestors did," Einaudi said. "I am opti- 
mistic that increased consciousness will 
combine right with job opportunities for 
resolutions." 

Senior Katie Hotze, who was ad- 



vised to attend the conference by two of 
her professors, offered her opinion on the 
presentation. 

"I thought it was very interesting," 
Hotze said. "It was great to get to talk to 
Ambassador Luigi because I know he's 
been very busy in Haiti and still took the 
time to talk with all of us." 

Special Adviser on Trade Jose Manu- 
el Salazar-Xirinachs spoke on the emerg- 
ing Free Trade Area of the Americas, 
which began in 1994. FTAA's mission is 
an effort by the heads of states and gov- 
ernments from 34 democratic countries 
to unite the economies of the Americas 
into a single free trade area. 

Salazar-Xirinachs reiterated the 
importance of free trade, quoting statis- 



tics like the 12 percent growth of Latin 
American exports to main world trading 
partners from 1988-1998. which was a 
higher rate of increase than that of Japan 
or Europe. 

"Every year the market becomes 
more and more open," Salazar-Xirinachs 
said. 

The final presenter, Jose Manuel 
Castafieda-Resendiz, alternative repre- 
sentative of Mexico to the OAS, spoke 
on the issue of hemispheric security. In 
the days prior to the videoconference, all 
the participating governments passed the 
OAS' Declaration of Security, which he 
said would offer protection for human 
beings, their rights, solidarity and sov- 
ereignty. It was five years in the mak- 
ing and covers such issues as terrorism, 
natural disasters, HIV, environmental 
degradation and drugs and weapons 
trafficking. 

"We recognize that security threats 
are diverse and multi-dimensional in 
scope ... it's not a binding agreement, 
it's an expression of the political will of 
our government," Resendiz said. 

"I encouraged my international 
marketing class to attend for two 
reasons," said Dr. Randall Donohue, 
CLU professor of business. "First, to 
experience the video conferencing 
technology. Second, to see the impor- 
tance of these multilateral trade-related 
organizations, which Bush isn't putting 
too much emphasis on." 

CLU President Luther Luedtke gave 
the event's introduction. He explained 
that the transnational videoconference 
was important in accomplishing CLU's 
mission to prepare students to be leaders 
in a global society. 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



NOVEMBER 12.2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

novembcr 12 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

French Club Meeting 

F-5 
6 p.m. 

Student Recital Class 

Chapel 
6:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel , 

9:11p.m. 



thursday 

november 13 



College Democrats 

Nygreen 2 
7 p.m. 





friday 

november 14 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Muck Box Productions 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Club Lu: Casino & Bingo Night 

SUB/Pavilion 
10 p.m. 



Saturday 

november 15 



Kingsmen Football vs. Whittier College 

Mt. Clef Stadium 
1 p.m. 

Black Box Productions 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Sunday 

november 16 

Intramural Flag Football 
North Field 
12 p.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 

6:15 p.m. 

Intramural Volleyball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 




monday 

november T7 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen I 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 



ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 




tuesday 

november 11 



Brown Bag Series 

WRC 

12 p.m. 



I 

I 



* 



s 



Tutors Needed: $15-$18/hr. Bright, enthusiastic people to teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal & Academic 
subjects in your area of expertise. We II train. Flexible 
scheduling. Trans, req. We tutor students throughout L.A. & 
the Valley. Mail, fax, or email cover letter and resume. Include 
standardized test scores (SAT I/II, GRE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or (ax resume to: (310) 282-6424 
or email resume to: instructoiiiiring6@aceeducadon.com 



Childcare Needed: Id T.O. home for an 11 month old child. 
2day min, Shr min.. Own trans. 

If interested, call: 
805-180-4030 



Classified ads can 

be placed on the 

Calendar page for a 

flat rate regardless 

of word count. 

Discount available 

for multiple-issue 

orders. Ads are 

subject to editing for 

content & clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



Students' Onc*s»fa*m<a«SB>e«rsgo»ms 



CL-U's Faculty omsbudspersons f< 

help students resolve problems oi 

with faculty in a confiden 



isbudsperson 






Your on-campi 

Dr. Eva Ramirez, Spanish Dr. Charles Hall, Sociology 

Office: Humanities 232 O/Jice: G-I5 

Phone: (805) 493-3349 Phone: (80S) 493-3437 

Dr. Druann Pagliasotti, Communication 

Office: SBET 119 

Phone: (805) 493-3374 

Don't let conflict ruin your learning experience: contact one of these three professors today! 



ALCOHOL AWARENESS WEEK 



NOVEMBER 10 THROUGH 14 



RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS WEEK 

NOVEMBER 10 THROUGH U 



Asian Club and 
Friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and 
FRIENDS! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori, president 

18 IS) 590-7625 



Where are YOU 
going? 




Come find out more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 

X37SO 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon • Fri. 

11:30-1:20 




'&9ipitaeg& Goextvn" 




'November 12, 2003 \ 8 p.m. in Overton Watt 

Join us for a night of original student poetry. 
If you nave any questions, caff J(i245 



Hungry for the Word? ■■"Tfwl^annn 



when Friday rolls around, 
we tend to feel a big sign or 
relief that we have survived yet 
another week. With all the busu 
schedules that accompany 
our lives, it helps to have a 
few moments set aside each 
week to feast on God's Word. 
Join us this and every Friday 
at 12 noon for a half-hour 
Devotional Eucharist in the 
Meditation Chapel. 

Want to know more? Call the Campus 
Ministry office at x3228. 



In June the good news came 

that CI. 11 was awarded 
$400,000 over a 3-year period 
"to increase student, faculty and 
staff diversity and transform the 
organizational culture, as part of 
the Campus Diversity Initiative. " 

At this retreat you will have the 
opportunity to be a part of some- 
thing new and exciting in the 
campus life of CLU. 

Friday, November 21st at 

Posada Roy ale in Simi Valley 

from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

(starting with breakfast) 

130 person attendance limit. 

Make your reservation 

as soon as possible by emailing 

jedrzeje@clunet.edu 



RETREAT 



Remember thattime you boogie- 

boarded down 

the muddy slopes 

of Kingsmen 

Park during the 

rain & ate tree 

to save yourself 

from the raging 

creek? 

Want to share great experiences 
like that with future students? 

Take Cal Lutheran 
Home for the Holidays! 

To sign up, or to get more information, 
please call Liz or Beckie at x3880. 



BLACK STUDENT 
UNION 

Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5: 15 p.m. 

in the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, 
AND FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Pryor Hall 

(805) 493-3951 

(BSU Advisor) 



News 



November 12,2003 



The Echo 3 



RHA promotes sobriety 



By Heather Peterson 
Staff Writer 

Alcohoi Awareness Week provides 
students with information about the effects 
of alcohol and offers activities that don't 
involve alcohol. Alcohol Awareness Week 
kicked off on Monday, Nov. 10. 

On Monday, students signed a sobri- 
ety contract in the Student Union Building 
stating that they would be alcohol-free for 
the entire week. Residence halls also had 
their own alcohol awareness activities, and 
plastic cups were passed out that had the 
schedule of activities for the whole week. 



"I signed the sobriety contract because 
I can concentrate on other activities be- 
sides drinking," senior Shirine Ghafouri 
said. 

On Tuesday, students went to the 
flagpole for root beer from root beer kegs. 

Crashed cars were placed on cam- 
pus on Wednesday to show the effects of 
drinking and driving. In a drug and alco- 
hol survey taken by California Lutheran 
University students last semester, about 
25 percent of students admitted to driving 
under the influence at least one time. 

"Drinking and driving is such a stupid 
thing to do, especially when there are so 
many ways to avoid it. People don't think 



of how terrible the consequences can be 
when they drink and drive," senior Deanna 
Dean said. 

Open-Mic night is at "The Need" on 
Thursday night, and some statistics taken 
from the CORE alcohol and other drugs 
survey taken by CLU students last semes- 
ter will be presented. 

"Students take more notice when the 
statistics are about them personally as 
opposed to national or state averages," 
said Beckie Lewis, RHA programmet^in 
charge of Alcohol Awareness Week. "It 
really hits home when the statistics are 
from CLU students." 

Monte Carlo Night and bingo night 



are back by popular demand and have 
been combined this year. These two events 
will take place on Friday at the SUB and in 
the Pavilion. Students can enjoy "mock- 
tails" and have the chance to win over 10 
trips to Las Vegas and/or Laughlin, as well 
as other prizes. The top money winner at 
Monte Carlo night will receive one of the 
10 trips to either Las Vegas or Laughlin. 

"1 think Alcohol Awareness Week does 
have an impact on some people, but oth- 
ers don't really think much of it," senior 
Jeremy Soiland said. "It's hard to change 
someone's mind about alcohol in just one 
week, -but the fact that the statistics are 
from us makes it a little closer to home." 



Universities recruit CLU students 



By Brian Roberts 
Staff Writer 



The Career Center hosted its second 
annual Graduate Fair in the quad area 
between the Humanities and Nygreen 
buildings on Friday, Nov. 7. Twenty-nine 
of the 30 graduate schools invited attended 
the event, offering information on graduate 
and doctoral programs. 

"Attendance doubled from last year," 
said Cindy Lewis, director of Career Ser- 
vices. "No one was a no-show, which is 
unheard of." 

Students packed the area from 10 a.m. 



"We hope we gave the 
students information on 
grad programs as well 
as the interview and 
application process." 

Cynthia Smith 
Career Counselor 

to 2 p.m., gathering information from such 
schools as Pepperdine, Chapman and Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University. 

Career Services gave students an early 



start on getting the information they need 
for graduate school. 

"We hope we gave the students infor- 
mation on grad programs as well as the 
interview and application process," said 
Cynthia Smith, career counselor. "We hope 
to get students thinking about getting the 
application process started early." 

The Career Center put considerable 
time into planning this event. 

"It takes about four months to get our 
fair done," Smith said. "We plan way in 
advance." 

Career Services has enough informa- 
tion to accommodate students unable to 



attend the event. 

"We have a list of all the universities 
attending on the Career Services website 
with links to every school," Smith said. 
"For those that missed, contact the Career 
Center for recruiter info." 

The fair was deemed a success by the 
Career Center. 

The event will take place again next 
semester, but on a Wednesday instead of 
a Friday. The Career Center hopes the day 
change will accommodate students who 
could not attend this semester. For more 
information on the grad fair, contact the 
Career Center at 493-3 1 96. 



Bills passed allocate funds to residence halls 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University's Resi- 
dence Hall Association has passed three 
bills in the last two weeks that will improve 
a few of the residence halls on campus. 

The first bill, passed at the Oct. 27 
meeting, allocated $3,000 to Old West 
for the purchase of a new pool table. The 
next bill allocated $600 to Mount Clef 
for the purchase of a couch. And, after 
much discussion, the third bill allocated 
$451 to Thompson Hall for the purchase 
of a DVD/VHS player and a collection 



of DVDs. The last two bills passed at the 
Nov. 3 meeting. 

RHA's biggest program of the year, 
Alcohol Awareness Week, began Monday, 
Nov. 10, and ends on Friday, Nov. 14. 
On Friday night, the RHA is sponsoring 
Monte Carlo Night with a casino and 
bingo theme and will serve "mocktails." 

"We have over 10 trips to Las Vegas 
or Laughlin to give away as prizes for 
bingo. This is the largest number of trips 
we have ever had to give away and we are 
really excited about it," RHA Programmer 
Beckie Lewis said. 

Other prizes include gift certificates 
to local stores and restaurants. 



Suzie Roslund, National Commu- 
nication Coordinator for CLU, attended 
The Pacific Affiliation of College and 
University Residence Halls conference 
last weekend. PACURH is an annual re- 
gional conference held at University of 
California at Santa Barbara in November. 
Roslund took 10 RHA delegates with her 
to the conference to present "Battle of 
the Sexes" and "Service in a Box" for 
program of the year. 

"Both of our programs got picked to 
be presented at PACURH, which is really 
exciting. It's rare that both submissions 
from a school are picked," Roslund said. 

Last week's Homecoming Carnival 



was well-received by students, as were 
many of the other Homecoming events. 
The RHA was in charge of four booths 
at the carnival. Members agreed that they 
went very well and next year, the only 
thing they might change is including more 
prizes at each of the booths. 

"The carnival booths looked great. 
It's the best set-up I've ever seen at CLU," 
said Angela Naginey, RHA adviser and 
director of Residence Life. 

Pederson Hall won the CLU 
spirit stick for the most attendance at 
Homecoming events. The next chance to 
win the spirit stick will be during Hall 
Caroling in December. 



HAGGARD SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

IS GOD CALLING YOU? 

Academic excellence and practical engagement are essential elements for 
you to effectively answer that call. We are committed to partnering with 
you on your journey of lifelong service for Christ. 

DEVELOPING GODLY, COMPETENT LEADERS 

We missed you at the graduate fair. Please call us at (626) 815-5439 or visit 
www.apu.edu/theology for more information on the Haggard School of Theology. 





4 The Echo 



Features 



November 12. 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What is one thing you would tell your teachers? 




Rachel Pensack-Rinehart, communication/ 
sociology, 2006 

"The syllabus needs to coincide with 
actual course material and assignments." 



Michelle Courtenay, psychology, 2004 

"We need more class participation, 
especially in our upper division classes. 
They also have to realize school is not our 
only life." 



Lyssa Jacobsen, theater arts, 2006 

"We are not given enough time to do 
work for our other classes; they think their 
class is the only one we have and they 
don't appreciate us working hard for the 
[art] productions." 



Victoria Reinhardt, history, 2004 

"Emphasize and follow through with 
office hours. If there are going to be 
changes, let the students know." 




David Sundby, philosophy/religion, 2005 



"They need to stick to the syllabus 
more often. They shouldn't say they are 
going to cover a certain topic and then 
spend more time on another topic." 



"The grading scales need to be more 
accurate and not based on thousands of 
points." 



"They add and take away assignments 
at the last minute." 



Corissa Gall, liberal arts, 2005 



"They make the syllabi vague and 
unclear." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Tessa Woodey. Photography by Danny Ermolovich. 



Students and staff learn self-defense 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writf.r 



Jennie Balise taught California 
Lutheran University students and staff 
self-defense techniques in Overton Hall 
on Nov. 8. 

Members of the same sex formed 
groups of two to practice the techniques 
for defense against attacks from one per- 
son. Balise said that there are advanced 
courses that teach techniques against 
multiple attackers. 

"I come from a background in work- 
ing with survivors of sexual assault, do- 
mestic violence and child abuse," Balise 
said. "I have about 20 years in that field, 
in various capacities as an activist and 
working on hotlines and in shelters. 

"Now, I'm a marital/family therapist 
intern and I work in private practice with 
survivors. I became interested in what 
can be done to prevent people from hav- 
ing to go through those experiences. For 
me, personally, it's been really energiz- 
ing and positive to be part of getting 
ahead of assaults and preventing assaults 
from happening." 

Balise said that statistics show one 



in three women and girls over the age of 
13 will be sexually assaulted and that us- 
ing the voice strengthens a self-defense 
act 30 to 40 percent. 

"Seventy to 80 percent of those as- 
saults will be perpetrated by someone 
she knows ... about 50 percent of assaults 
take place during the day," Balise said. 

She said that girls and women ages 
9 to 90 had fended off their attackers 
using self-defense and the techniques 
could be taught to people of all physical 
capabilities. 

"For a time, I was working with the 
L.A. Rape and Battery Hotline and we 
were teaching self-defense to women 
with various physical disabilities," 
Balise said. 

She also explained what to do to pre- 
vent an attack. 

"The no. 1 thing 1 would say is to 
really be aware of your surroundings 
and to trust your guts," Balise said. "I 
would say trust the creepy felling if you 
feel it and be willing to be assertive, to 
tell somebody to go away or that they're 
too close. Being assertive can prevent, 
I would say, 90 percent of the [attacks] 
from happening. The attacker is looking 



" The no. 1 thing I would 
say is to really be aware 
of your surroundings and 
to trust your guts." 



Jennie Balise 
Self-defense Instructor 

for somebody who's going to make a 
good target." 

Many students who attended the 
event found the information and the safe- 
ty defense strategies to be very useful. 

"I thought it was very beneficial to 
all the people who attended," junior Jar- 
ed Perry said. "I'm an RA, so I'm going 
to bring it back to Thompson [and] I'm 
going to show my residents more about 
it as well. I feel pretty safe [at CLU]. 
But then again, I'm a guy who's had 
some training with the CHP (California 
Highway Patrol) but I just want to make 
everyone safe as well." 

Sally Sagen, coordinator of Resi- 
dence Life and Area Residence coordi- 



nator organized the workshop, said, 

"I'd taken a lot of self-defense 
workshops before this, but I think one 
of the most important things to see was 
how empowering it can be for so many 
of the students. Personally. I think there 
were a couple different techniques that I 
learned that I hadn't learned before. 

"I feel pretty safe [at CLU]. I know 
that there are certainly times when our 
safety may be threatened but I think that 
I personally make an effort to be more 
aware of what's going on in my sur- 
roundings. I think that a lot of people, 
like Klay [Peterson] said, can be lulled 
into a fake sense of security here and 
I think it's just really important to be 
aware of everything that's going on 
around us." 

Sagen said that Women's Resource 
Center director Dr. Kateri Alexander 
had already organized the event. 

"It just ended up [going] very well 
as we were doing programming with 
the safety whistles we're passing out, 
as well as all the things that have been 
happening on our campus this year," 
Sagen said. 



Arts 



November 12, 2003 



The Echo 5 



Alumni exhibit includes thoughts on ILS. 



By Lindsay Elliott 
Staff Writer 



The art of California Lutheran Uni- 
versity alumni will be featured in the 
Kwan Fong Art Gallery of Art and Culture 
throughout the month of November. John 
Luebtow presents his glass sculptures and 
David Waage and Carlmike Lagasca dis- 
play their photography. 

Waage and Lugasca's exhibition, titled 
"Glimpse of India," provides viewers with 
black-and-white photographs of everyday 
life in India. Many of the photographs 
include images from markets and small 
shops, groups of children and individual 
portraits. 

Luebtow, who graduated from CLU in 
1967 and currently resides in Chatsworth, 
Calif, has been featured in over 190 art 
exhibitions for his glasswork. 

"[My glass is] a melding of personal, 
national and political, circuitously ques- 
tioning, what have we done to get where 
we are? Where are we going? These forms 
merge the feelings promulgated by life's 
harsh truths," Luebtow said. 



Most, of Luebtow's pieces are made 
up of glass and brushed aluminum. His 
"Linear Form Series," which includes 15 
pieces, is a prime example of his signature 
media. Part of this series is commissioned 
by the Los Angeles County Museum of 
Art. 

Luebtow attributes his method of cre- 
ating his glass sculptures to the pursuit of 
the line. 

"Line evolving from the drawings of 
the female nude. Line expressing move- 
ment and the rhythm of energy," Luebtow 
said. "Line creating forms through its ex- 
tension, expressing my primary sculptural 
concerns with what I call linear form." 

Luebtow's work on display follows a 
colorless theme, except for his American- 
themed work. "Flag on Grid, Ode to Con- 
gress Gridlock, What Becomes of a Dream 
Deferred #3, Where are We Going" is a 
piece that is composed of glass, enamel, 
rebar and a chrome-plated aluminum base. 

"Enameled kiln-formed tormented 
glass finds itself sagaciously welded 
and in alliance with the frayed unruly, 
constrained, constricting imposing steel 




Photograph by Rachael Carver 
Freshmen Ashley Cook and Chelsea Taylor ride on the Sizzler during last weekend's 
Homecoming carnival. 

'Tom Thumb' is 
complex and witty 



By Michael Cabral 
Staff Writer 



"Tragedy of Tragedies: Tom Thumb 
The Great, An Adult Comedy" was writ- 
ten by Henry Fielding and is directed by 
Michael Amdt. 

This tragic play is full of twists and 
turns that students, teachers, alumni and 
others are sure to be entertained by. 

The first act introduces the audience 
to a typical Shakespearian setting of medi- 
eval customs. 

Amdt's creative direction takes the 
audience through different periods of time 
ranging from the Old West to the Roaring 
Twenties and into the future. 

Rob Schneider, playing the role of 
King Arthur, has an awesome stage pres- 
ence and delivers a comical performance 
that left the audience laughing even after 
he exited the stage. 

Kelly Murkey, playing the role of the 
drunken Queen Dollallolla, was also just 
as funny. In fact, each character in the 
play was hilarious and complemented one 



another. 

To get a really good idea of "Tom 
Thumb," one would probably have to see 
the play more than once. The play was pre- 
sented in pentameter form, meaning each 
line has 1 beats. The humor portrayed was 
adult, although I would not be surprised if 
a child would have been entertained. 

The costumes and the effects were a 
show of their own. In fact, the costumes 
in "Tom Thumb" were so accurate and im- 
pressive that they could probably be used 
in a play on Broadway or at the Ahmanson 
Theater. 

The idea of changing the period of 
time in between each act was perhaps the 
most creative twist on the play. It not only 
kept the audience involved, but also gave 
new light to creative settings, stunts and 
costumes. 

This is a production that could easily 
have failed if the costumes, sets, actors and 
creativity had not been all in key. However, 
Amdt, the performers and the set crew 
managed to entertain the audience with 
this successful performance. 




Photograph by Rebecca Hunau 
Student Billy Proctor examines one of John Luebtow s glass sculptures in the Kwan 
Fong Art Gallery. 

cable," Luebtow said. deferred?)(Where are we going)", show- 

Clearly his American-themed case Luebtow's thoughts and opinions on 
pieces, which include "Flag on Grid" the pursuit of the American dream and 
and "Why?(What becomes of a dream society in general. 

Student-run plays 
to open this week 



By Kaytie St. Pierre 
Star- Writer 



The student-run Black Box Produc- 
tions will open this weekend in the Little 
Theater. These productions are complete- 
ly student directed and produced. 

The term "Black Box" is used be- 
cause the plays are generally performed 
in the Little Theater, where all the walls 
are painted black. 

"This is a very intimate setting," said 
student and Black Box director Brianne 
Hervey. "The audience is only 10 feet 
away, so it brings the action right up to 
them and allows them to become involved 
and enjoy the show. They become a part 
of the show and the energy." 

This year, there are four one-act plays: 
"Blueberry Pie," "At Home," "Split" and 
"Does this Woman Have a Name?" 

Senior Joannie Bryant is directing 
"Does this Woman Have a Name?" which 
is primarily about relationships. 

"I really like putting my own creative 
style and vision to work," Bryant said. "It 
is fun to get away from teachers into a to- 
tally unstructured environment. There are 
no rules and I can do whatever I want." 

"Blueberry Pie." which was directed 
and written by Hervey, is about a woman 
who has been attending a diner every year 
for the past 60 years to relive the memory 
of a lover who was lost in Pearl Harbor. 



Jaime McEnnan and Kelly Murkey. 
both seniors, each directed a one-act 
play that make up a complete story. "At 
Home," directed by Murkey, is about a 
couple who seem to have had an ideal 
relationship, but have real problems. 

"Directing has given me a chance to 
see a much more holistic perspective that 
forms the big picture, instead of focusing 
on just a single character," Murkey said. 

McEnnan's play, "Split," takes place 
about two weeks later when the couple 
has divorced. It shows how their friends 
react and what happens in their lives after 
the divorce. 

Directing the plays is a new endeavor 
for each of these students .who are mainly 
used to being on the stage, not behind the 
scenes. 

"It is hard to remember that I am not 
going to be on the stage," McEnnan said. 
"The actors are the ones that are seen and 
given the recognition, but I love having 
the opportunity to follow my own vision. 
How the show ultimately ends up is how 1 
say it is going to be." 

The Black Box performances start 
Nov. 14 and 15 with "Does this Woman 
have a Name?" and "Blueberry Pie." and 
conclude the following weekend, Nov. 
22 and 23. with "At Home" and "Split." 
Performances will take place in the Little 
Theater at 8 p.m. 



Students should take 

advantage of the escort 

service. Hours are 

Sun.-Fri. 9 p.m.-l a.m. and 

Sat. 9 p.m.-ll p.m. Call 
Campus Security at xt. 3208. 



6 The Echo 



Opinion 



November 12,2003 




How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

December 3, 2003 
December 17, 2003 



XM radio not needed in SUB 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



Recently the Senate approved $610 
to purchase an XM Satellite Radio for the 
SUB. The $610 will pay for installation of 
the unit and a one-year subscription to the 
XM Satellite service. I believe this expen- 
diture will benefit only a small contingent 
of CLU students and that the money could 
have been better spent. 

The placement of high-end audio 
equipment in the SUB seems pointless. 
Students go to the SUB to check for mail. 



send mail, or attend school-sanctioned 
events held there. It would be difficult to 
enjoy the benefits of commercial-free radio 
during the five or 10 minutes it takes the 
average student to check his or her mail- 
box. In addition, so far as I can see. The 
Need and other school-sanctioned events 
held in the SUB do not require the use 
of XM radio. Since The Need provides, 
almost exclusively, live entertainment, 
which negates the use of a radio, this pur- 
chase seems poorly planned. 

This $610 expenditure only benefits a 
few people: members of the ASCLU and 
students who work at the SUB desk. Com- 
muter students (who comprise about 44 
percent of the undergraduate population) 
and students who just go to the SUB to get 
their mail gain nothing from the purchase. 

On the other hand, maybe the XM 
Satellite Radio will encourage students to 
spend more time in the SUB. Even if this 
is the case, I believe the money could have 
been used in a manner that would have 



benefited a larger percentage of the student 
population. For example, $610 could have 
purchased 25 or 35 new books for the li- 
brary. Those books would be available to 
all students and have the power to educate 
in a way that commercial-free pop music 
cannot. This money could have been used 
to buy art or drama supplies, gym equip- 
ment or intramural sports equipment. 

But perhaps I'm just jaded and cyni- 
cal. After all. The Echo's office is located 
in the garage of a student house. We don't 
even have a bathroom; in fact, the only 
amenities are a beat-up CD player and a 
refrigerator, both of which were donated 
by former Echo staff members and not 
paid for with student fees. 

Our elected officials acted out of self- 
interest when they passed this bill. The XM 
Satellite Radio will benefit members of the 
student government more than students 
who elected them. Since most students 
spend little time in the SUB, I think free 
AM/FM radio is more than adequate. 



Liberal bias is a reality in media 



By Brian Roberts 
Columnist 



Aside from greatly disagreeing with 
Brett Rowland's editorial last week, I feel 
that it's time for a conservative viewpoint 
to help others understand why the media 
is perceived as being biased. This is not 
meant to demean any articles or beliefs 
that our editor in chief may have. How- 
ever, if a topic brought to the surface has 
a liberal spin to it, I'm going to counteract 
it by standing up for the other side of the 
spectrum. 

If one wants to view facts about true 
liberal bias, all one has to do is drive down 
to the bookstore and pick up a copy of Ber- 
nard Goldberg's "Bias: A CBS Insider Ex- 
poses How the Media Distort the News." 

This New York Times bestseller was 
not written by a conservative, a Republican 
or even a moderate. Goldberg is, in fact, 
a liberal Democrat. While the facts about 
reporters being liberal are true — in fact, 
50 percent affiliated themselves with the 
Democratic Party and only 4 percent with 
the GOP — the fact that editors are not 
liberals because of sales and advertising 
could not be farther from the truth. 

Goldberg worked for CBS for nearly 
30 years, winning seven Emmy awards, 
and he was once ranked by TV Guide as 
one of the 10 most interesting people on 
television. 

However, in a span of a couple of 
months, he was fired from his position be- 
cause of an op-ed piece he sent to the Wall 



Street Journal and his criticism of an editor 
for a liberal story. 

In the op-ed piece to the Journal. Gold- 
berg opened the nation to the first forms of 
media distortion in the news, mainly show- 
ing off the bad sides of the major three net- 
work anchors — Dan Rather, Tom Brokaw 
and Peter Jennings. 

"The problem is that Mr. Rather and 
the other evening stars think that liberal 
bias means just one thing: going hard on 
Republicans and easy on Democrats," said 
Goldberg. "But real media bias comes not 
so much from what party they attack. Lib- 
eral bias is the result of how they see the 
world." 

But like Rowland said in his editorial 
last week, the reporters do not decide what 
goes on broadcast television; their editors 
and producers do, right? Claiming that 
reporters have no say in what is produced 
is absolutely false. True, they do not sit in 
dark corners and plan strategies on how 
to slant the news. They don't have to; it 
comes naturally to most reporters. They do 
not believe they have a liberal viewpoint 
because most who are liberal do not want 
to be associated with the word and the con- 
notations that go along with it. 

Goldberg's book tells the story of what 
he did to get fired. It all started when he 
criticized a piece by fellow reporter Eric 
Engberg on presidential candidate Steve 
Forbes. Now, I know this is not the hottest 
and most attractive news piece, but it raised 
enough eyebrows to show where the news 
stands on the political stage. Engberg's 



piece completely humiliated Forbes with 
"facts" that turned out to be false. The edi- 
tor went to the cutting table and left every 
aspect of liberal bias in the article, while 
taking every remotely true fact out. 

Liberal bias exists. It's a fact to anyone 
who isn't a Democrat. Everywhere I go, 
liberals complain, about the No. 1 news 
station right now, FOX News. They claim 
it has a conservative agenda and deliber- 
ate slant to it. They continually shout the 
names of Bill O'Reilly and Sean Hannity 
as proof that FOX is run by Republicans. 
However, most seem to forget about Alan 
Colmes, who works along side Hannity, on 
their "Right vs. Left" debate show. 

Many people don't believe there's a 
liberal bias in the media because they do 
not consider what the news anchors are 
saying to be liberal. The complaints come 
from conservatives who see how the news 
topics are being distorted and repackaged 
to fit the left wing's agenda. 

This is exactly what liberals claim 
when referring to FOX News. They com- 
plain the GOP agenda is being pressed, 
even though FOX is the only network that 
has both left and right viewpoints. Liber- 
als' claims turn into oxymorons when they 
defend broadcast television and then bash 
FOX News. They are doing the same thing 
conservatives are doing. 

However, don't tell them that, because 
to them, they aren't doing anything wrong. 
If it is freedom of speech for liberals to 
protest a war, why can't Republicans cry 
blasphemy against networks? 



The 



Echo Staff 



Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Karen Peterson 
News Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Arts & Features Editor 



Brandee Tecson 
Opinion Editor 

Angela Fentiman 
Sports Editor 

Kyle Peterson 
Photo Editor 

Nicholas Andersen 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 

Copy Editor 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



I iiiit.>n.il Matter The staff of The Echo welcomes comments 
on its articles as well us on the newspaper itself However, the 
Staff acknowledges thai opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Adveru iing Matter: Except as clearly implied by the advertis 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805) '93-3865. 



Irk|uines InquincJ about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief, The Echo. California Lutheran Univer- 
sity, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fax: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 

echoWclunel.edu. 



November 12, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 7 



Kingsmen soccer closes season with three shutouts 



By Lindsey Rarick 
Staff Writer 



Kingsmen Blank Chapman 2-0 

The California Lutheran University 
men's soccer team shut out Chapman 2-0 
in a nonconference game Monday at Or- 
ange. 

The action started in the first few min- 
utes of the game as senior striker Danny 
Ermolovich scored in the third minute 
from an assist by sophomore midfielder 
Mark Tevis. 

With Chapman in a panic from the 
Kingsmen's early first goal, the game be- 
gan to get increasingly more physical. A 
Chapman player fouled one of the Kings- 
men and. as a result, the second goal came 
in the 8th minute of play from Tevis, who 
scored off of a free kick taken by senior 
midfielder Kevin Stone. 

"The first 20 minutes was the best 
we've played all season. We were on fire," 
senior captain Willy Jennett said. 

The mud caused by the adverse 
weather conditions made passing difficult, 
but the Kingsmen overcame the obstacles 
by connecting passes and moving the ball 
quickly. 

At the end of the first half, the score re- 
mained 2-0 with the Kingsmen in the lead. 
"After we got two goals, it was hard 
to keep footing on wet ground. We tried 
to maintain our style of play, but we had 
to alter it a little," Head Coach Dan Kuntz 
said. "Chapman sent everyone forward so 
we had to stay organized and play balls 
quickly out of the back. With a wet field, 
anything could happen." 

In the second half, Cal Lutheran was 
able to hold the lead due the Kingsmen's 
defensive effort. Chapman outshot the 
Kingsmen 9-3 in the second half, but CLU 
keeper Jamie Lavelle stepped up to provide 
six vital saves to preserve the shutout. 

"I only have good things to say about 
our Chapman game. I was so proud of 
them, it made me emotional. The train- 
ers were great. They kept me warm even 
though it was freezing outside," senior 
captain Rody Rafeh said. 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Freshman Kyle Murray fights for the ball with a Caltech opponent on Nov. 5. 

Kingsmen lead. Caltech did not give up, 



Aschim Nets Two In Win Over Caltech 

The Kingsmen soccer team beat 
SCIAC opponent Caltech 6-0 Wednesday 
at North Field. 

In the first half, senior Dean Klipfel 
was eager to score as he netted the first 
goal one minute and 37 seconds into the 
game off an assist from Tevis. 

"Tevis crossed it to me, I brought it 
down accidentally and put it in the back of 
the net," Klipfel said of his early goal. 

The second goal came less than a min- 
ute later from junior midfielder Greg Allen 
off an assist by senior Havard Aschim. 
The third Kingsmen goal was scored 10 
minutes and 38 seconds into the game by 
Aschim. In the 18th minute of SCIAC play, 
Allen and Aschim figured into the scoring 
once again. This time Allen provied As- 
chim with the assist, allowing him to score 
his second goal of the game. The Kings- 
men continued to keep the pressure on 
Caltech throughout the first half, outshoot- 
ingthem 16-5. 

"We played well but we just played 
down. We could have moved the ball 
around more," sophomore midfielder Mi- 
chael Falcone said. 

The second half began with a 4-0 



continuing to fight, especially midfielder 
Meghan Crowley. The Kingsmen did not 
mind playing against a woman on an all- 
men's team. 

"I don't really care about playing 
against a girl. She's one of the better 
players on their team," said sophomore 
midfielder Justin Green. 

"She can hang with the guys. I think 
she's a good player," Ermolovich said. 

Despite the second-half efforts of 
Caltech, the Kingsmen scored two more 
goals. Junior striker Todd Norman dribbled 
past Caltech defenders and shot the ball 
past the Caltech keeper in the 49th minute 
to score the fifth Kingsmen goal. In the 
76th minute of play, freshman Alex Candia 
scored the final Cal Lutheran goal, making 
the final score 6-0 Kingsmen. 

"I think we can play better than today, 
but what happens is that we play to a cer- 
tain level and play down a bit. But after six 
goals, what more can one want," Assistant 
Coach Doc Kuntz said. 

Men's Soccer Wins Last SCIAC Game 

The Cal Lutheran men's soccer team 
finished its season with a 2-0 shutout over 
SCIAC opponent Occidental Friday at 



Regals end season with a pair of wins 



By Justin Shore 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's soccer team concluded its season 
with a 1-0 victory over Chapman Univer- 
sity and a 2-0 win over CSU Hay ward. 

The Regals finished the season with an 
overall record of 9-7-3. 

Although previously eliminated from 
playoff hopes, the Regals battled and de- 
feated Chapman College on Nov. 3 by a 
score of 1-0. 

Aubreigh Hutchinson scored the only 
goal of the contest in the 82nd minute from 
a pass by transfer student Danielle White. 

"1 am very happy that 1 transferred to 
Cal Lu this year. The coaching was good 
and everyone on the team was so nice to 
each other. I will miss being around the 
girls," White said. 

One goal was all it took for a Regal 
victory. Goal keeper Pamela Clark made 
four saves, shutting out Chapman. 

The Regals played their final game 
on Nov. 6 with a 2-0 win against CSU 
Hayward. 

Senior captain Bonnie Bomhauser 
concluded her collegiate career with a 
game-winning goal in the 23rd minute of 
play. With the goal, Bomhauser scored a 




Ashley Warmulh wins the battle for a header 
team-leading nine goals this season. 

"A win was a great way to go out. I 
am going to miss my team, especially the 
seniors. I feel good about leaving this pro- 
gram because I know that players like Am- 
ber Anderson will continue scoring goals 
in the future," Bomhauser said. 

Amber Anderson added an insurance 
goal in the 74th minute. With her sixth 
goal of the season, Anderson ranked sec- 
ond among Regal goal scorers. 



Photograph by Dan Norton 

over a CSU Hayward opponent. 

Clark tallied three saves and ended her 
collegiate career with a shutout. 

Although the Regals did not make the 
playoffs. Head Coach Dan Kuntz remains 
very proud of his team. 

"This is one of the best teams that I 
have had at CLU. Our record is no indica- 
tion of the women's talent level. I am espe- 
cially proud of the seniors for their leader- 
ship and their hard work," Kuntz said. 



North Field. 

With their final win, the Kingsmen 
ended their season with an overall record 
of 9-10-1 and a record of 8-6 in SCIAC 
league play. 

In the first half, the Kingsmen battled 
with the Tigers. The fouling was also even- 
ly distributed, with eight fouls called on the 
Kingsmen and eight on the Tigers. 

As the play began to get increasingly 
more physical, one CLU player was given 
a yellow card, as was an Occidental player. 
The first half ended with CLU and Oxy in 
a 0-0 tie. 

"We knew it was going to be a pretty 
physical game. We talked about moving 
the ball around quickly so we could pre- 
vent injury," Kuntz said. 

In the second half, the Kingsmen put 
their scoring power to work, netting a goal 
only seven minutes into the half. The goal 
was scored by Rafeh from an assist made 
by Ermolovich. 

Six minutes later, in the 58th minute 
of play, Aschim scored off an assist by 
senior midfielder Stone. The goal by As- 
chim marked his team-leading 10th of the 
season. 

"It was so great that Rody scored in 
his last game playing at CLU. It was also a 
perfect end to Havard Aschim 's career here 
at CLU, being our leading goal scorer," 
Kuntz said. 

With the score 2-0 in the second half, 
the Kingsmen worked hard both offensive- 
ly and defensively. In the second half, Cal 
Lutheran had 1 1 shots on goal, while the 
Kingsmen defense held Oxy to only three 
shots in the second half. 

Cal Lutheran preserved the 2-0 SCIAC 
win in their final game of the 2003 season. 
CLU keepers Lavelle and senior Jason 
Block shared time in goal. In 60 minutes 
of play, Lavelle made one save, while Oc- 
cidental keeper Brandon Hickie was forced 
to make six saves. 

"It was an emotional day with eight 
seniors graduating. I thought the men 
handled it very well. We were definitely 
the better team on the field and we showed 
that. We wanted to finish off our season 
with a win," Kuntz said. 

Water Polo loses 
three in SCIAC 

By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
water polo team was defeated 20-4 by 
Whittier on Wednesday, Nov. 5. 

The Kingsmen are now 1-12 
overall, and 0-5 in conference. 

The four CLU goals were scored by 
Jared Clark, Mark Nielson, Jamie Aron- 
son and John McAndrew. 

Aronson scored his goal with only 
seconds to go in the third period. 

"I caught the goalie off guard when f 
shot from half court," Aronson said. 

Goalie Andrew McGranahan re- 
corded 13 saves for the Kingsmen. 

The Kingsmen played two close 
games on Friday, Nov. 7. They were de- 
feated 14-6 by Claremont-McKenna and 
nearly beat Caltech, but fell 13-11. 

"We'll beat Caltech next time, when 
we play them this weekend at the SCIAC 
tournament," Aronson said. 

Aronson scored three of the six 
goals for CLU in the game against Cla- 
remont. 

The Kingsmen will be competing in 
the SCIAC tournament this Saturday at 
Whittier College. 



8 The Echo 



Sports 



November 12, 2003 



T? H TT~7~ T T~ 1 ' November 12, 200: 

Baseball team holds annual golf tournament 

d.. i^.,,.. ,w.ii. ■ and Lance Parrish. nartir.inanR Hr, naf »H „»«„„, i u:,:_ . t . ... 



By Kyle Wells 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
baseball team held its 24th annual Sparky 
Anderson/CLU baseball golf tournament 
at the Tierra Rejada Golf Club in Moor- 
park, Nov. 3. 

Players from around the community 
participated in the event with a number 
of well-known athletes, including Sparky 
Anderson, Rick Dempsey, Mike Liberthal 



and Lance Parrish 

"The tournament was a lot of fun, and 
it was great to be able to meet and play 
with some of the old ball players," said 
Andrew James, tournament participant and 
CLU baseball player. 

Marty Slimak. head baseball coach at 
CLU, organized the event. In the past, the 
golf tournament has been the biggest fund- 
raiser for the CLU baseball team, and this 
year was no exception. 

A silent auction was held in addition to 
the golf tournament. Many of the celebrity 



Football falls 34-24 at Oxy 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University's three 
game winning streak was snapped this 
week on the road as they came up short 
against the Occidental Tigers, 34-24. 

Occidental put the first score on the 
board going up 7-0, but the Kingsmen 
answered immediately, with a 37-yard 
field goal by Alex Espinoza, followed by a 
48-yard touchdown pass from quarterback 
Casey Preston to Peter Gunny. 

The Tigers then picked up three more 
touchdowns making the score 27-10 at the 
half. 

"We just fell behind early and couldn't 



catch them; they out-played us. We had 
several chances at some big plays, but we 
couldn't come up with the stops," Quinn 
Longhurst said. 

The Tigers found the end zone again 
in the third and increased their lead to 34- 
10. The Kingsmen rallied. Preston scored 
from a yard out and then connected with 
Jimmy Fox for a 10-yard touch down, but 
it was too little, too late. 

Preston was 15-37 for 260 yards. Gun- 
ny had three catches for 1 1 5 yards and Fox 
had six catches for 93 yards. Fox moved 
into second place on the all-time career 
receptions list at Cal Lutheran. 

"I think we just came out fiat and we 
never recovered from falling behind early," 
Prentice Reedy said. 



Volleyball ends season with 7 straight losses 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
volleyball team lost both of its matches last 
week to end what was a rather forgettable 
season. 

The losses extended the team's losing 
streak to seven matches in a row. ending 
the season with a record of 6-19 overall 
and 4-10 in conference play. The Regals 
finished seventh in the SCIAC standings. 

In the last home match of the year 
CLU hosted Pomona-Pitzer. The Regals 
came out slow and lost in three games. 
The games scores were 30-16, 30-28 and 
30-24. 

"We wanted to go out like we started, 
but we kind of dropped the ball a little," 
sophomore Keely Smith said. 

Freshman Meredith Nelson and soph- 
omore Christie Barker led the CLU offense 
with 12 and 11 kills, respectively. Smith 
led the team with 24 assists while fresh- 
man Jessica Hagerty added 12. 



On the defensive side, junior Brionna 
Morse came up with a team-high 14 digs 
while Schneider added 13. The Regals fin- 
ished with a match-high five blocks. 

For their final match of the season, the 
Regals traveled to Claremont to face Clare- 
mont-Mudd-Scripps. 

The Regals were able to stay close in 
each game, but still lost in three. The game 
scores were 30-25, 30-26 and 30-23. The 
team failed to win a game in any of their 
last four matches. 

"It wasn't that we wanted the season to 
end. but you can only lose so much before 
you start getting tired of it," Smith said. 

Katie Schneider led the way for the 
Regals in this match with a team-leading 
1 4 kills while also recording 1 5 digs. Morse 
was the leader in digs with 17. Smith fin- 
ished with a match-high 33 assists. 

"We have nowhere to go but up. We 
didn't want the season to end because we 
have so much talent and so much potential, 
and you can only say that so much, but we 
really improved on the little things this 
year," Smith said. 



Jesus is Coming! 

WELS Campus Ministry and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church invite you to 

join them for confessional Lutheran Bible Class and Worship. 

The Sunday morning Bible Class at 8:30am is studying the life of Abraham. 

Through Abraham, God foreshadows the world's salvation in Jesus Christ. 

Just as God provided the sacrifice for Abraham and Isaac, He provides you 

with Jesus Christ - the'Xamb of God who takes away the sins of the world". 

Bible Class is followed by traditional Worship 

at 9:30AM. Join with the Church this 

Advent season in preparing for Christ's 

coming! 

For more information on the WELS 
Campus Ministry, to join our e-mail 
list, or for a free devotional booklet, 
e-mail clu@princeofpeace-wels.org. 



www.princeofpeace-wels.org 




participants donated personal memorabilia 
to support the team. 

Autographed bats, balls and jerseys 
were some of the items up for bid in the 
auction. 

"Overall, the fundraiser was very suc- 
cessful," Slimak said. 

The proceeds of this tournament will 
go toward new equipment for the CLU 
baseball team and travel costs not covered 
by its budget. 

"The lengths in which the baseball 
program goes to make sure we are set for 



the season is really great," said Roy Riley, 
CLU baseball player. 

Even though the Sparky Anderson/ 
CLU baseball golf tournament is the big- 
gest fundraiser for the team, it is not the 
only one. 

The CLU baseball team holds a 50-in- 
ning fundraiser in which players are spon- 
sored by individuals and businesses, who 
donate $1 per inning they play. 

The team also runs the snack shack at 
CLU football games, where they earn the 
profits from the food and drink sales. 



Intramural Sports 



Flag Football 
Results Nov. 9 

Death Inc 38, Snipers 34 
Aquafina 56. That's Enough 24 

Bad Boys 46. Da Braddas 27 

Kentucky Straight 73. Los Polos Diablos 12 

All-Stars 

Chelsea Ward 

Matt Broussard 

Carly Sandell 

Cesar Costales 

Robert Boland 
Ashley Warmuth 

Carrie Mitchell 
Greg Semerdjian 

Playoff Schedule 
Nov. 16 

2 p.m. 

Death Inc. vs. Aquafina 

3 p.m. 

Bad Boys vs. Kentucky Straight 



Flag Football Standings 


Bad Boys 


5-0 


Aquafina 


4-1 


Kentucky Straight 


4-1 


Death Inc. 


3-2 


Snipers 


3-2 


That's Enough 


3-2 


Da Braddas 


2-3 


Los Pollos Diablos 


2-3 


Shockers 


1-3 


The Mooses 


1-3 


Big Ballin' 


0-4 


Brackets for Flag Football and Volleyball are 


posted on the bulletin board in t 


ie gym. 



Volleyball 
Results Nov. 6 

Mystery Meat def The Buttons 
MJ2KRBS7 def. That's Amazing (forfeit) 
Bust a Move Groove def Free Agents (forfeit) 

All-Stars 

Heather Worden 
Greg Semerdjian 

Results Nov. 9 

MJ2KRBS7 def Aces Wild 
Chivos y Chivas def. Mystery Meat 

All-Stars 

Nick Namba 

Mark Jordan 

John Galier 

Rachael Carver 

Playoff Schedule 
Nov. 13 

9 pm 

Wilson vs Shooting Stars 

The Buttons vs Bust a Move Groove 

10 p.m. 

MJ2KBRS7 vs. Minna 
Chivos y Chivas vs. Aces Wild 



Volleyball 


Standings 


MJ2KBRS7 




6-0 


Wilson 




6-0 


Chivos y Chivas 




6-1 


Shooting Stars 




3-3 


The Buttons 




3-4 


Aces Wild 




2-3 


Minna 




2-3 


Bust a Move Grove 


2-5 


That's Amazing 




2-5 


Mystery Meat 




1-5 


Free Agents 




0-4 



Park Oaks Shopping Center (Ven's Plaza) 

1710 N. Moorpark Rd.* Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

(805) 777-8866 • Fax: (805) 777-8868 



Professional Packaging & Supplies 

US Postal Services 

Fax Services 

Printing Services (business cards etc) 



HOJ6 

WRMOWftfiflOpm 

SAT:9fl3anv4flrjpn 

SUN:dosed 

• Pnvate Mailboxes (personal/business) • Greeting Cards 

- Large Format Copying . Nolary Services 

■ Photocopies . BulkMailinq 

■ Passport Photos • Laminating 



Fwf^r Authorized ShipCenter' 



WE ACCEPT ALL COMPETITORS' COUPONS 




1 MONTH 
FREE 

with 3 month Mailbox 
Rental 



'1 694 COLOR 
COPIES 

8'A"x1 1.24* paper. 

Limit 100 



Independently owned & opciaed. S 



34B&W 
COPIES 

8'h" x 11. Single-sided. 
Limit 500 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 44, No. 10 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA91360 



November 19. 2003 



Sports 

Kingsmen crush the Poets with 
record 70-13 win. 



See story page 8 



Arts/Features 

CLU students plan "Take Back the Night" vigil to take a stand against 
domestic violence and sexual assault. 



See story page 5 



News 

Students gamble the night away at 
Club Lit. 



See story page 3 



Recycling needs 
work on campus 



By Erick Elhard 
Staff Writer 

Where students put their trash on 
campus affects the university and the 
environment. 

CLU has 19 trash bins that get 
"tipped," or emptied, between 3-5 times 
per week and 12 recycling bins that are on 
a once-a-week emptying schedule. This 
process requires two separate trucks from 
G.I. Rubbish Company; one for standard 
waste and one for recyclables. Annually, 
G.I. Rubbish's services cost CLU over 
$60,000. However, a great deal of money 
could be saved if students, staff and fac- 
ulty would separate their waste into the 
appropriate recycling receptacles. 

"It is only 20 percent of the cost to 
dump the recycling Dumpster compared 
to a regular Dumpster," said Ryan Van 
Ommeren, director of facility operations 
and planning. 

This translates into an 80 percent sav- 
ings per Dumpster. per empty for CLU. It 
costs $322 for one month of emptying all 
12 recycling bins on campus, compared 
to the thousands of dollars to "tip" the 1 9 
waste bins. 

It is also important to ensure that ev- 
erything is put in its proper place. The 
university pays G.I. Rubbish for a special- 
ized service where many types of recycla- 
ble materials, including cardboard, glass, 
No. 1 and No. 2 plastics, paper and metal 
can all be put into the same recycling bins 
on campus. Later, the contents of the bin 
are sorted, separating out all the recy- 
clables and removing the non-recyclable 
trash. However, this sorting process only 
works to a certain point. 

"It's [the contents of the recycle bins] 
run through a conveyor belt at the landfill 
and sorted by hand," said Marco Alcaraz, 
customer service representative at G.I. 
Rubbish. "The people try to remove the 
trash, but if there's too much of it, then 
it's dumped because it's considered a 
contaminated load." 

Van Ommeren admitted that contam- 
inated loads can be a problem at CLU. 

"It's always a challenge to have the 
custodians keep things separated, but 
we're working on it all the time," he 
said. 

Students are also guilty of contami- 
nating the recycling bins. An investiga- 
tion of the receptacles behind Mogen Hall 
on Monday showed two nearly empty 
green waste bins, and a clearly marked 
blue recycling bin half full of plastic 
garbage bags filled with miscellaneous 
waste, the majority of it appearing to be 
not recyclable. 

Bill Rosser, vice president of student 
affairs and dean of students, is a propo- 
nent of recycling at CLU. 

"We all need to do our part to recycle, 
renew and reuse," Rosser said. "On the 
promotion end of things, more could 
be done [on campus]. Make sure more 
people understand the impact of recy- 
cling. Make it more easy and obvious for 
students to recycle." 



Library gets $50k 



By Brian Roberts 
Staff Writer 



The Parson Foundation has donated 
$50,000 to the Pearson Library to help 
renovate the building. Library renovations 
will include reconfiguring the shelving and 
lighting. 

The process of receiving a grant from 
private organizations takes time to final- 
ize. 

"CLU has a process for approaching 
foundations to fund projects," said Julius 
Bianchi, associate provost for Information 
Services. "The first step is to determine 
what type of grant a foundation will likely 
fund along with timelines and guidelines 
for submitting proposals. With private 
foundations, requests are more likely to 
be funded if there is some personal contact 
with the foundation." 

Once the first steps are completed, the 
administration has to sign off on a grant 



planning approval form. Sometimes there 
are specific forms with questions, and 
other times the application is submitted in 
the form of a letter. 

"CLU went through this process with 
the Parson Foundation to improve ac- 
cessibility to library holdings," Bianchi 
said. "In particular, we requested funds 
to begin replacing the compact shelving 
in the library, and when the application is 
completed, the final grant approval form 
and the proposal have to be approved by 
the provost, vice president for finance and 
administration and the president." 

The Parson Foundation grant will be 
spent primarily to reconfigure the library 
stacks. 

The biggest obstacle to making the 
change is addressing the lighting issues in 
the library facility. Plans are being made 
to reuse the existing shelving and install it 
in a new area in the library. The library has 
worked with Facilities, an architect, and 
lighting experts to create a lighting plan 



for the area where the new stacks would 
be located. 

"The plan also calls for relocating 
the library computers and current peri- 
odicals," Bianchi said. "We also plan 
to reconfigure the space vacated by the 
Scandinavian Cultural Center into a new 
study space and shelving for the curricu- 
lum lab collection." 

The lighting plans and budget for the 
project are complete, and the project also 
included supplemental money from the 
university's budget to address additional 
lighting issues and carpeting. However, 
the university funds that would supple- 
ment the grant have been deferred to the 
2003-2004 fiscal year. 

"We are always grateful for grant 
money," Bianchi said. "The university 
could not accomplish nearly as much as 
it does without the generous contributions 
of the donors and the gifts we receive 
through private foundations and the state 
and federal government." 



Gambling at Casino Night 



By Heather Peterson 
Staff Writer 



Club Lu went Vegas-style last Fri- 
day night. Bingo and Casino games were 
played in the Student Union Building and 
in the Pavilion. 

In the SUB, students were given $100 
in fake money to play with at several dif- 
ferent casino games including black jack, 
craps and roulette. They were also given 
the chance to increase their money by spin- 
ning a wheel with odds of I to 1, 2 to 1, 5 
to 1, 10 to 1,20 to 1 and 40 to 1. 

The five students with the most money 
at the end of the night won a trip to Las Ve- 
gas, Nev. The trips include three days, two 
nights at the Silverton Hotel and Casino in 
Las Vegas, Nev. Sophomore Evan White 
was the top winner, ending up with over 
$17,000. 



Outside in the Pavilion, students had 
the chance to win over 46 different prizes 
by picking them out of a box. These prizes 
included 10 trips to Las Vegas or Laughlin, 
Nev., Mann Theater movie tickets, and gift 
certificates for Noah's Bagels, among other 
prizes. Senior Kristin Smith won one of the 
trips to Laughlin, Nev. The trip includes 
three days, two nights in a hotel and a 
prime rib dinner. 

"It was really fun to go to Casino 
Night and watch everyone win prizes. And 
I'm really looking forward to getting to go 
to Laughlin," Smith said. 

Casino Night marked the end of Al- 
cohol Awareness Week. During the fes- 
tivities, RHA members handed out "mock- 
tails" to'all the students in attendance. 

"There was a really good turnout of 
CLU students," sophomore Alexandra 
Mallen said. 




Photograph by Rachael Carver 
Senior Lissa Merrill places a bet at the 
craps table. 



"Movie Night" draws large crowd 



By Jennifer Pfautch 
Staff Writer 



Programs Board reviewed past events 
and discussed future changes to the Club 
Lu schedule at the Nov. 10 meeting. 

Movie Night was a big success, said 
the Programs Board at Monday's meeting. 
There were 230 students in attendance. 

"People had a lot of fun. 'Radio' was 
filled with CLU students," junior Eliz 
Baesler said. "It was great." 

Attendance was scattered, but "Ra- 
dio," starring Cuba Gooding Jr. and Ed 
Harris, was the most popular with stu- 
dents. 



"I think it went really well and every- 
one was excited," said event planner Jen 
Carlson. 

Several suggestions were given to 
further improve "Movie Night" for next 
year. Baesler suggested providing snacks, 
while Robby Larson, director of Student 
Programs, suggested going to a theater 
further away that would be willing to show 
the newest releases. 

Club Lu's planned event of Laser Tag 
for Nov. 21 is being replaced with another 
event because the place is booked, said 
Programs Board Director Courtney Parks. 

Laser Tag will hopefully be worked 
into Club Lu's schedule in January. The 



event will be replaced with Karaoke Night 
in the SUB. The leopard coat-clad Kara- 
oke King, who has provided other Club 
Lu events with music, will be the disc 
jockey. Krispy Kreme doughnuts will also 
be provided. 

Ice skating is booked for Club Lu on 
Dec. 5. Students can skate from 9 p.m.-12 
a.m. Public skating goes until 9:30, so 
there might be some overlap, but is hardly 
a concern. 

Jimmy Fox reported that the next 
Senior Pride social will be the first week 
in December with hopes of it being held 
at Black Angus. Specifics will come in 
weeks to follow. 



2 Tnr Echo 



Calendar 



NOVEMBER 19.2003 




today 

november 19 




Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 



Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Rotaract Meeting 

Overton 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 

november 20 



Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Mogen Hall Lounge 
6 p.m. 



a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




Black Box Productions 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Intramural Volleyball Championship 

Gym 

9 p.m. 



The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

november 21 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Wind Ensemble 

Chapel 
8 p.m. 

Club Lu: Karaoke 

SUB 
10 p.m. 




Saturday 

november 22 



Black Box Productions 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Sunday 

november 23 

Black Box Productions 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

2 p.m. 

Intramural Flag Football 
Championship 

Mt. Clef Stadium 

3 p.m. 



Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 

6:15 p.m. 





monday 

november 24 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 



* 



(*5 

s 



Tutors Needed: S15-$18/hr. Bright, enlhusiaslic people 

to teach one-on-one, in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal & 

Academic subjects in your area of expertise. We II train. 

Flexible scheduling. Trans, req. We tutor students throughout 

L.A. & the Valley. Mail, fax, or email cover letter and resume. 

Include standardized test scores (SAT l/ll. GRE. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 YV. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; Los Augeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310) 282-6424 
or email resume to: iu5tructorbiring6@aceeducatioa.com 



Childcare Needed: In TO. home for an 1 1 month old child. 2 
day min, 5 hr min.. Own transportation. 
If interested, call: 
805-180-4030 



Classified ads can 

be placed on the 

Calendar page for a 

flat rate regardless 

of word count. 

Discount available 

for multiple-issue 

orders. Ads are 

subject to editing for 

content & clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



Stuideitts' Omsbudspersons 

CLU's faculty omsbudspersons for student concerns arc available to 

help students resolve problems or conflicts that they may be havine. 

with faculty in a confidential and unofficial manner. 

Your on-campus omsbudspersons arc: 

Dr. Eva Ramirez, Spanish Dr. Charles Hall, Sociology 

Office: Humanities 232 Office: G-15 

Phone: (805) 493-3349 Phone: (805) 493-3437 

Dr. Druann Pagliasotti, Communication 

Office: SBET 119 

Phone: (805) 493-3374 

Don't let conflict ruin your learning experience; contact one of these three professors today! 



"We live in an interconnected world today.. .Yet there are many hungry people throughout the world who never get into the news, making it easy for us to lose 
sight of what many other people go through each day. These people are just as worthy in Gods eyes as we are, and yet we hardly even know they exist. I see 
these people in poor countries working to better their lives, and eager to correct their own problems." 

Come hear David Gist from "Bread for the World" on Nov. 26 at 10:10 a.m. in Samuelson Chapel talk about what we can do to help the undernourished around the globe. 



Asian Club and friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and 
FRIENDS! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitswnori, president 

(818) 590-7625 



HOW DO YOU 
CELEBRATE? 

Giving Thanks from East to West 

Come celebrate Thanksgiving and 

Ramadan! 

Free food and gifts!!!! 

Date: November 20, 2003 

Time: 6-8pm 

Place: Nelson Room 

If interested, have questions, or to sign 
up. call: Katie at x2366 



Rain, Rain Go Away 
so Cafe a la Cart can Stay! 







i. 



On rainy days, Cafe a la Cart will be 
closed as an electrical precaution. 



Remember that time you boo- 
gie-boarded down the muddy 
slopes of Kingsmen Park during 
the rain & ate tree to save your- 
self from the raging creek? 

Want to share great experiences 
like that with future students? 

Take Cal Lutheran 
Home for the Holidays! 

To sign up, or to get more Informa- 
tion, please call Liz or Beckie at 

xseao. 



Where are YOU 
going? 




Come find out more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 
XJ7SO 

studyabroadiiSclunet.edu 

Open Mon - Fri. 

11:30-1:20 



Hungry for the Word? 



When Friday rolls around, ' 
to reel a Dig sign of relief ui. 
nave survived yet another < 
With all the busy schedules that 
accompany our lives, it helps to have 
a few moments set aside each week, 
to feast on God's Word. Join us this 
and every Friday at 12 noon for a 
half-hour Devotional Eucharist in 
the Meditation chapel. 

Want to know more? Call the Cat r _ 
Ministry office at x3228. 



cd i /en in p us 

D I U ERSITV 



In June the good news came that 
til was awarded $400,000 over s 
3-year period "to increase student, 
faculty and staff diversity and trans- 
form the organizational culture, as 
part of the Campus Diversity Initia- 
tive. " 

At this retreat you will have the op- 
portunity to be a part of something 
new and exciting in the campus life 

ofCLU. 

Friday, November 21st at Posada 

Royaie in Sims Valley 

from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (starting 

with breakfast) 



130 person attendance I 

Make your reservati 

as soon as possible by en 

jedrzeje@clunet.ed 



r e x Ft e n x 



BLACK STUDENT 
UNION 

Meetings are held every 

MONDA Y at 5:15 p.m. 

in the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, 
AND FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Pryor Hall 

(805)493-3951 

(BSU Adviser) 



November 19,2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



AAW crashes into CLU 



By Heather Hoyl 
Staff Writer 



Last week's RHA meeting was 
canceled in honor of Alcohol Aware- 
ness Week. AAW is the RHAs biggest 
program of the year and their goal is to 
use a combination of passive and ac- 
tive programs to inform and educate 
the students on alcohol-related issues. 
Much planning and coordinating time 
goes into it to. make it a very memo- 
rable program. 

AAW began Monday. Nov. 10, and 
ended on Friday. Nov. 14. The halls 
had something planned for each night 
of the week and Monday night was 
the big kickoff. About eight members 
of the RHA executive cabinet walked 
around to each of the halls to check out 
their active and passive programs for 
the night. 

Mount Clef took over the bulletin 
board in the entryway and covered it 
with facts and statistics about alcohol 
and drunk driving. They also had a root 
beer keg and gave out red plastic cups 
with the AAW schedule on them. 

Pederson had a dance party outside 
and hall President Aaron Rosenberger 
brought both his computer and speak- 
ers outside to DJ the event. Pederson's 
ARC. Nicole Hackbarth, served up 



root beer floats while residents hung 
out and listened to the music. During 
the event, an announcement was made 
that students from various residence 
halls had "died." and the alcohol-re- 
luted story of how they died was read 
for the group. 

Thompson had originally planned 
to have a toga party, but at the last min- 
ute it dropped the toga theme. Never- 
theless, residents like Joe Henley still 
came dressed in togas despite the cold 
weather. The hall council prepared 
snacks and mocktails for the event, 
including a large cooler full of "jungle 
juice." A group of students sat at a 
table in the corner playing "drinking" 
games with cards. 

New West did a sports bar-themed 
party with Monday Night Football on 
TV and decorated to match each of 
the teams playing that night. The hall 
served nachos and pretzels, and New 
West Programmer Jen Ledesma served 
root beer floats and made Jell-O shots 
with Sprite. 

Old West hung statistics in the 
lounge for people to read while 
munching on nachos and M&M's and 
drinking root beer. It played the movie 
"Old School," and quite a few students 
came down for the viewing. 

MKH had a luau for their active 



Park Oaks Shopping Center (Vcn's Plaza) 
1710 N. Moorpark Kd.« Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 hdub 

(805) 777-8866 • Fax: (805) 777-8868 Mr™,,,^.* 

SAT:9<i0jm-K«V'r> 



Professional Packaging & Supples 

US Postal Services 

Fax Services 

Pnnting Services (business cards, etc) 



• Pnvate Mailboxes (personal/business) • Greeting Cards 

• Large Format Copying • Notary Services 
- Photocopies • Bulk Mailing 

• Passport Photos • Laminating 



jfecf£ Authorized ShipCenter' 



WE ACCEPT ALL COMPETITORS" COUPONS S. 



1 MONTH I! 69^ COLOR ii 3$ B&W 
FREE COPIES COPIES 

with 3 month Mailbox |] 8V2" x 1 1 . 24# paper, jj 8V/x 11. Single-sided. | 



Rental 



Limit UK) 



Limit 500 



_| 1 ;-..i ■..jiirin.Hi ...■, 1* -< _ _ _ _m_;_ ':_; ■ 

Eji-ii ftijjN'H Ctnlor mrieperiDVnll^ im rn.-d .', riL.K-t.ilKl Spivh B may vary 



Jesus is Coming! 

WELS Campus Ministry and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church invite you to 

join them for confessional Lutheran Bible Class and Worship. 

The Sunday morning Bible Class ar 8:30AM is studying the lite of Abraham. 

Through Abraham, God foreshadows the world's salvation in Jesus Christ. 

Just as God provided the sacrifice for Abraham and Isaac, He provides you 

with Jesus Christ - the" Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world". 

Bible Class is followed by traditional Worship 

at 9:30AM. Join with the Church this 

Advent season in preparing tor Chrisr's 

coming! 

For more information on the WELS 

Campus Ministry, to join our e-mail 

list, or for a free devotionaJ booklet, 

e-mail clu@princeojpeace-wels.org. 



L 






pn 



nceorpeace 




wels, 




Photograpli by Rebecca llunau 
Two crashed cars were placed on (he Humanities budding steps early Wednesday morn- 
ing to show the effects of drunk driving. 



program, with beach music playing 
and games like beer-goggles limbo. 
Each person came in the door got a lei 
with a statistic about alcohol. Not only 
did they give out the AAW cups, but 
MKH President Stephanie Snyder and 
MKH Programmer Kate Fornaca made 



cups with more alcohol-related facts 
on them to use with their strawberry 
margarita mocktails. 

The RHA members were proud of 
the work that went into Monday night's 
programs and happy with the turnout at 
the events. 



Student Escort Service 



Saturday: 9-11 p.m. 



Sunday-Friday 9-1:00 a.m 



Please contact Campus Safety and Security at ext. 391 1 with questions. 




Listen 

Process. 
Help. 

Conflicts 

are more 

complex 

than ever. 

Prepare to 

help people 

manage the 



Azusa Pacific University's graduate programs in Psychology offer: 

• An APA-accredited Psy.D. Program 

• An M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy Program 

• A curriculum with a family psychology emphasis that 
integrates spirituality and values 

• A blend of theoretical and practical elements of 
psychology 

For more information about APU's programs in graduate 
psychology, call (626) 815-5008, (800) 825-5278, or visit 
www.apu.edu/educabs/graduate/psychology/. 



AZUSA PACIFIC 



4 The Echo 



Features 



November 19,2003 



Campus Quotes 



What is one thing you would tell your students? 





«# i-m 




Dr. Pamela Brubaker, religion 

"Enjoy your life, but make it count for 
something." 



Dr. Xiang Chen, philosophy 
"Ask questions." 



Dr. Bruce Stevenson, English 
"Never forget Mother's Day." 



Dr. Margaret Prescott, communication 

"Use your college experience to leam 
about as many things as possible and al- 
ways ask questions." 




Dr. Michael Shaw, bioengineering/physics Dr. Henry Alegria, chemistry 



'it always helps to keep one eye on the 
horizon." 



"You have to know your limitations." 



Dr. Jarvis Streeter, religion 

"Show up for class and do the read- 



Dr. Jessica Ramos-Harthun, Spanish 
"Enjoy your life, but study hard." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Lindsay Elliott. Photography by Danny Ermolovich. 



Registration is not a reason t o stress 



By Michael Cabral 

Staff writer 



Worrying about what courses are 
important to take, finding time to balance 
one's school and social life and making 
that decision to take an early class are just 
some of the problems facing students dur- 
ing registration. 

Each year brings advantages and dis- 
advantages to registration. Freshmen have 
a lot of time to take classes and by senior 
year, students are first in line for registra- 
tion. 



i usually don't stress around registra- 
tion time because 1 usually have a good 
idea on what classes I am going to take," 
said sophomore Sarah Gray. 

Knowing what classes students are go- 
ing to take a few days before they see their 
adviser relieves some tension. 

"Students should not worry about 
completing their core requirements fresh- 
man year; it's fine to spread them out over 
the first two to three years," said Dr. Sha- 
ron Docter, chair of the communication 
department. 

Everyone has their own theory about 



" Students should not worry 
about completing their core 
requirements freshman year; 
it's fine to spread them out 
over the first two to three 
years." 

Dr. Sharon Docter 
Chair of Communication Dept. 

what influences their scheduling process. 

"First of all, the teacher is a very big 
part of it; then what the time of the classes 



are, and also the convenience. 1 don't like 
having scattered classes during the day." 
said senior Sean Ruitenberg. 

Students shouldn't stress if they still 
have core classes midway through junior 
year. Many majors' classes also cover core 
requirments. 

"I would use college as a time to 
experiment with taking different kinds 
of classes. If a student has an interest in 
music, literature or biology, don't let your 
major restrict you. Take courses thai inter- 
est you and are even out of your comfort 
zone," said Docter. 



CLU Wind and Jazz ensemble sure to delight 



By Kelly Jones 
Staff writer 



There is hidden treasure at California 
Lutheran University that is only heard dur- 
ing evening practices and performances: 
the Wind and Jazz Improvisation En- 
sembles. 

The wind ensemble has been under 
the instruction of Dr. Daniel Geeting. He 
also started the jazz ensemble last year to 
improve the jazz skills of students. The 



wind ensemble is comprised of 45-50 CLU 
students and the surrounding community. 
They play a wide selection consisting of 
traditional American band music and a 
variety of world music from contemporary 
sources. They perform throughout the year, 
including an annual concert at Ronald Rea- 
gan Presidential Library. 

"I think it is a very good and unusual 
thing for a school this size to have a wind 
ensemble this good," Geeting said. 

The jazz ensemble that was started in 



2002 is dedicated to learning of basic ap- 
proaches to jazz and improving the skill 
level of each student. They perform with 
the wind ensemble at all of their perfor- 
mances as well as a few smaller on- and 
off-campus shows. 

"The jazz and wind ensembles are 
very talented and Dr. Geeting is a great 
conductor. I am looking forward to hear- 
ing the jazz ensemble because I am a huge 
jazz fan," said sophomore choir member 
Allison Eagans. 



The jazz and wind ensemble will 
be performing in a concert called "Hid- 
den Gems." The jazz ensemble will be 
featured, doing on-the-spot impromptu 
performances. The concert takes place on 
Friday, Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. in the Samuelson 
Chapel. 

"I went to the CLU choir and sym- 
phony show and really enjoyed it, so I am 
looking forward to the 'Hidden Gems,"* 
said sophomore Amy Bates. 



November 19, 2003 



Arts 



The Echo 5 



'Take Back the Night' involves CLU and community 



By Kaytie St. Pierre 
Staff writfr 



California Lutheran University stu- 
dents and staff are planning a "Take Back 
the Night" event set for April, which is 
Sexual Assault Awareness month. The 
committee had their first meeting to plan 
the event last Thursday, Nov. 13. 

"Take Back the Night" is a non-profit 
candlelight vigil to protest against domestic 
violence and sexual assault. The event will 
include a rally with speakers and music. 
Participants will march around Thousand 
Oaks with glow sticks. 

"Sexual abuse happens all the time 
to both men and women alike, but no one 
talks about it," said Michelle Taylor, stu- 
dent and head of "Take Back the Night" in 
Ventura County. "This is a protest saying 
we are not going to take it anymore." 

Lindsey Heitman started this organiza- 
tion about four years ago. It started with 



about 20 people and involved passing out 
flyers around campus and the community 
to raise awareness about sexual assault. 
The committee took the administration on 
a walk where people would hide in places 
that attackers could hide and jump out at 
the administration. This emphasized the 
importance of safety and led to installation 
of the blue lights on campus. 

""As a woman, I shouldn't have to 
be afraid to walk around campus," said 
sophomore Allyson Fredericksen. 

Along with wanting to involve as 
many of the community members as pos- 
sible, the organization wants to involve 
local businesses and high schools. This 
would include organizations such as the 
local police and fire departments. Planned 
Parenthood, Oxnard and Moorpark col- 
leges and CLU clubs. 

"The more we network, the bigger the 
event and the more empowering," Taylor 
said. "The more people involved, the more 




Photograph by Danny Er 
Lyndsay Herman, Nick Gordon and Michelle Taylor discuss "Take Back the Night. " 

impact the event will have " the rally and involving local newspapers. 

The participants at the meeting broke Students interested in participating in 

up into committees to cover all aspects of "Take Back the Night" should attend the 

planning the event, such as planning the next meeting on Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. at the 

route, finding speakers and performers for Women's Resource Center. 



Diamond relates geography and environment to world 



By Tessa Woodey 
Staff writer 



On Monday, Nov. 10, California Lu- 
theran University students, faculty and the 
local community were invited to attend a 
speaker series in the Samuelson Chapel. 
Dr. Jared Diamond spoke on how "An- 
cient History Comes Alive in the Modern 
World- 
Diamond spoke on his theory based 
on his studies of geography and environ- 
mental science. The theory challenges old 
culture and race-based theories by ques- 
tioning why certain civilizations are con- 
quered while others are not. It also focuses 
on how ancient civilizations have shaped 
the challenges that many face today. 

Civilizations that seemed to have a 



head start in food production advanced 
beyond the stages of hunting and gather- 
ing and went on to develop writing, gov- 
ernment, technology and religion. They 
adventured across land and sea to conquer 
preliterate tribes. 

One theory given by Diamond con- 
cerned the Maori people of New Zealand 
in the 1800s. The European traders went 
to New Zealand to trade guns, or mus- 
kets, for agriculture. These were known 
as the "Musket Wars." It then quickly 
turned into tribes with guns versus tribes 
without guns. Diamond put this into 
modern perspective by stating, "today we 
are concerned with the spread of nuclear 
weapons." 

Another topic addressed was the role 
of society and the spread of technology. 



This was illustrated through the different 
orginizational styles of Microsoft and 
IBM. Microsoft is a company that has a 
hundred different groups interacting and 
working together. They try out different 
ideas and receive information and feed- 
back from others on how to fix or change 
those ideas. IBM, however, is a company 
that has groups also working on ideas, but 
they are isolated and do not to interact 
with others outside their group(s). There- 
fore, Diamond concluded that IBM was 
not successful in spreading technology as 
Microsoft. 

"I thought his metaphor for technol- 
ogy was very extensive where he had a 
way of distinguishing countries strengths 
and weaknesses," freshman Piamor Jac- 
obe said. 



Diamond gave many more arguments 
relating to geographical and environmen- 
tal factors and how they shape the modern 
world. 

"I thought he was interesting: how 
history is shaped by geography and his 
perspectives of Europe and China and 
how they have progressed in the world," 
freshman Jean Libby said. 

Diamond won a Pulitzer Prize for 
his best-selling book "Guns. Germs, and 
Steel: The Fate of Human Societies." He 
was also awarded the MacArthur Founda- 
tion "genius" grant and the Tyler Prize for 
environmental science. He is currently a 
professor of geography and physiology at 
the David Geffen School of Medicine at 
UCLA. He has been teaching there since 
1966. 



Poetry reading inspires students and staff to write 



By Marybel Lopez 
Staff writer 



Dr. Jack Ledbetter hosted his 130th 
poetry night at the "Night at the Overton" 
on Nov. 12. Students, as well as faculty and 
staff, were welcomed to share their work 
or listen to the poetry of others. Students 
were also welcome to share their favorite 
works and art by their favorite artists. 

"Dr. Ledbetter really inspires me a 
lot. He helps me find the core of my poems 
so that they don't sound really fluffy," said 



senior Shauna McGaha. 

The English departmental assistants, 
which include Rachel Eskesen, Emily 
Moore and Katharine Boyd, put the event 
together. In addition to planning the event, 
the assistants were in charge of publicizing 
the event and providing refreshments. 

"I've been writing for myself for over 
ten years now, like in journals and stuff, 
but just recently got into poetry," Boyd 
said. 

Boyd is inspired by works of Shake- 
speare and Frost, but feels that singers can 



be great poets, too. 

"Have you ever really listened to 
a singer's lyrics, like really listened to 
them? Like Tori Amos: I consider her as 
great a poet as just about anyone," Boyd 
said. 

After CLU alumni Chris Moya was 
the first to read his poem, Ledbetter in- 
vited him to go look at his table of prizes. 
The prizes included several items brought 
in from Ledbetter's home, from old shoes 
to old paintings. 

Among the readers that night was Dr, 



Ernest Tonsing, a retired CLU professor. 
Tonsing's poems talked about his child- 
hood. "Pen and Ink" described what is 
was like growing up as a young boy in 
school. The poem went into great detail 
on how much harder it was to be a student 
back then compared to being a student 
now. Tonsing was not the only one who 
relied on memories for inspiration. 

"Memories, I think, are what inspire 
me to write the most; memories and the 
people that come in to my life," Boyd 
said. 



Game 'Lament of Innocence' awkward yet addicting 



By Mathew Bemer 
Staff writer 



After a series of popular 2-D Castl- 
evania games, Konami attempts once more 
to break the mold in creating the world 
of whips, swords, daggers, and most im- 
portantly, vampires in an interactive 3-D 
environment. "Lament of Innocence" is 
not only the most exquisite Castlevania 
game since "Symphony of the Night," but 
is also perhaps the most electrifying and 
noteworthy action/adventure game made 
for PlayStation 2. 

Why fix what is not broken? "Castl- 
evania: Symphony of the Night" is consid- 
ered by many one of the greatest games on 
the Play Station, and yet it was released in 
1997. Since the release of "Symphony of 
the Night," 3-D Castlevania games have 



been tried and published. Unfortunately 
as apparent with the return to 2-D games, 
3-D had been the wrong way to go. Many 
fans were worried when Konami an- 
nounced that the next Castlevania would 
be completed using the third dimension. 
For nearly 14 years, every Castlevania 
game of note had been two-dimensional 
scrollers. While many didn't know what to 
expect from Konami and the development 
team working on the project, "Lament of 
Innocence" leaves little to complain about. 
Horror strikes Leon Belmont as Dracu- 
la captures his wife-to-be. Abandoning his 
position and role in society, Leon leaves his 
previous life behind in hopes of rescuing 
his betrothed. However, the game's hero is 
no ordinary man; Leon Belmont descends 
from a great line of vampire hunters. Once 
again, a lone hero enters Dracula's domain 
and castle in hopes to gain back something 



precious. With whip in hand, Leon is able 
to parry, block and attack in any number of 
combinations while simultaneously using 
vast and mysterious relics serving count- 
less purposes. 

With a learning curve of about half an 
hour, "Lament of Innocence" can be quite 
vexatious as you become accustomed to 
the controls and learn the ineffectiveness 
of button mashing. 

Whether dodging, parrying or com- 
bining moves, you will often find that 
survival, while imperative, rarely relates 
to the player's skill and much more to 
common sense, such as the realization of 
enemy tactics and simply running away 
when your life is uncomfortably low. With 
button mashing leaving you defenseless 
and straight up shielding creating a lack 
of damage, "Lament of Innocence" leaves 
most battle aspects and the technique re- 



finement necessary for victory up to the 
player. 

Do stupendous graphics and visual 
stimulation create an excellent game? No, 
they don't, but they most certainly make a 
well-planned and already-addicting game 
more fun to play. One of the most impres- 
sive 3-D action adventure games on the 
market, "Lament of Innocence" spares no 
room in processing power as it is displayed 
at 60 frames a second. Unfortunately, an 
uncontrollable camera leaves much to be 
desired in the world of interaction and 
3-D design. With exploration and maneu- 
verability through and behind obstacles, 
the longing to reposition the camera con- 
tinually becomes a problem. Fortunately 
enough, complaints regarding the game's 
camera system pales in comparison to the 
overall delights to partake of within the 
game. 



6 The Echo 



Opinion 



November 19. 2003 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

December 3, 2003 
December 17, 2003 



Alcohol week needs new ideas 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



Alcohol Awareness Week has 
changed little in the three years that I 
have attended this school. It is time for 
new ideas. The fake car crashes, chalk- 
outlined bodies on the sidewalk and 
endless barrage of statistics about the 
dangers of drunk driving simply don't 
make the cut. Certainly these methods 
make students more aware of the dan- 



gers of alcohol, but they do not promote 
responsible drinking. 

Furthermore, some of the activities 
carried out during Alcohol Awareness 
Week this year were simply offensive. 
For example, putting signs on the doors 
of student dorm rooms that falsely in- 
form residents that one of their peers 
died the night before in an alcohol relat- 
ed accident is shocking. For 10 minutes 
on Thursday morning, I believed that one 
of my fellow CLU students had died in 
a car crash. Later, after walking around 
campus, I discovered that the flyers were 
simply anti-drinking propaganda. That's 
a hard trip to swallow before an 8 a.m. 
class. Not only does this make students 
question the validity of notices posted on 
their doors (i.e. the little boy who cried 
wolf), but the faking of a student's death 
in order promote alcohol awareness is 



the moral equivalent to putting pictures 
of aborted fetuses on students" doors to 
promote abortion awareness. 

The week's finale is Monte Carlo 
Night, during which students are served 
fake cocktails and then encouraged to 
engage in gambling, an activity that re- 
wards risk-taking and is considered by 
some experts to be addictive. And, in 
an act of complete hypocrisy, winners 
are given a free trip to Las Vegas, the 
sin capital of the United States, where 
free alcoholic beverages are passed out 
to gamblers. 

In future years. I would suggest that 
Monte Carlo Night be replaced with an 
activity that is not so closely associated 
with drinking and risk-taking. Perhaps a 
movie night or a Christian rock concert 
would better fit the theme of alcohol 
awareness. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo. 



I just wanted to make a few additional comments to last week's ar- 
ticle entitled "Conservatives quashed." I had the delightful pleasure of 
interviewing Ben Shapiro a few hours before he spoke at the Republican 
Club, First, I want to state my disappointment that more professors and 
liberals did not attend the speaking engagement. Ben Shapiro is not your 
regular 1 9-year-old college student. 

He is an exceptional young man, starting at UCLA at 16, becoming 
a nationally syndicated columnist by 19 — up there with David Lim- 
baugh. Larry Elder. Ann Coulter. He is a virtuoso violinist and is inter- 
viewed weekly on several national radio stations across the country. 

The guy debated with Al Sharpton, one of the nine Democratic 
presidential candidates. Despite the constant debate with his liberal 
professors and fellow students, Shapiro has a wonderful sense of humor 
and a delightful personality. 

My first question to Shapiro was what he considers, besides the 
pressing issue of Islamic terror and fanaticism ("the most immediate 
danger"), the most important domestic/social problem facing America 
today. He stated, "bias against Christians." This is coming from a prac- 
ticing Orthodox Jew. 

"The contempt for Middle America, for religion on campus, and so 
forth has got to stop. It's not politically correct to be a Christian. Every 
other religion is accepted except this one." 

The most important thing Shapiro has to say to high school and 
college students is to stay well informed on social and political topics 
in order to formulate their own opinions instead of blindly following 
Hollywood, MTV or their professors. He also suggests reading — a 
lot. Shapiro spent his summer reading over 50 books, which included 
biographies, history, politics, economics and some works of fiction. If 
Shapiro had one wish, it would be that the left-wingers (you barely hear 
that phrase in the press; I wonder why?) make honest arguments. 

To find out more about Ben, go to www.benshapiroonline.com. His 
book entitled, "Brainwashed: How Universities Indoctrinate America's 
Youth," is scheduled for release next May. Whether you align yourself 
with the right or left, this book is a must-read and will most probably 
confirm what you already know or have experienced. 

Simone M. Rizkallah 

Marketing Communication, Alumna, Class of 2003 



Dear Mr. Rowland, 

I have wanted to respond to your very extreme point-of- 
view articles in the Echo for a while now, but I have decided 
to finally do it. Your editorial in the Nov. 12, 2003, issue of 
the Echo was very Unfair toward the ASCLU and student 
workers in the SUB. You sound like you are expecting pity 
and resources from the university, as well as the students 
here, because you have to produce The Echo from a univer- 
sity house garage. What I do not understand is why you have 
decided to pick on this one expenditure. It is a mere $610! Let 
it go, man. I hope that you have read an article in your own 
paper, the one on page 3, tilled "Bills passed allocate funds 
to residence halls" by Heather Hoyt I live in Pederson Hall. 
How does a S45I purchase of a DVD/VHS player and a col- 
lection of movies benefit me if I am never in Thompson Hall 
to use them? Do I reap benefits from the spending of $600 for 
a new couch in Mt. Clef? 

Just because a person will not gain direct reward from 
the expenditure of funds does not justify you calling them 
"pointless" and "poorly planned purchases." They are there 
to benefit those in that area of campus. If a student chooses 
to not go to the SUB and check their mail, then that is the 
student's decision. However, while they are there, it would be 
enjoyable to have an uninterrupted music and radio source. 

Hindsight is always 20-20. If at the end of the year, the 
ASCLU decides that the trial run was unsuccessful, then 
there is always an option to cancel the service. If there are 
not any new ideas and trial runs, then no change would come 
to pass. What is the worst that could happen? All we would 
be losing is a mere $610. I believe that once the installation 
is complete and students have a chance to experience the use 
of it, a survey should be given out to determine if the expen- 
diture has been beneficial to those who chose to use it. There 
are many other wasteful expenditures that the university has, 
and picking and choosing which ones are actual waste is not 
going to help matters at all. 

Philip Galvan 
Accounting, Class of 2007 



The 



Echo Staff 



Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 
Business Manager 

Karen Peterson 
News Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Arts & Features Editor 



Brandee Tecson 
Opinion Editor 

Angela Fentiman 
Sports Editor 

Kyle Peterson 

Photo Editor 

Nicholas Andersen 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Ediion.il Mailer The itafFof lhe Echo welcomes comments 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself However, the 
staff acknowledges ihji opinions presented Jo not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit alt stories, 
editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the advertis- 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Etho are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising materia! primed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 



Inquiries Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California Luthcrao Univer- 
sity. 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks. CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fax; (805) 493-3327; E-mail 

.■t hoc tluncl.edu. 



November 19. 2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 7 



Union re-opens Ralphs to consumers 



By Devon Bostock 
Columnist 



Two weeks ago, I attempted to cover 
both sides of the grocery strike, even 
though my initial motivation was to blast 
the union for its selfishness. I wrote a story 
that was supportive of the stores and even 
the union workers, but not the union itself. 
I could find no evidence to support any of 
the claims the union was making. 

Now, in the latest development in 
the grocery strike, the United Food and 
Commercial Workers Union has pulled its 
picketers from Ralphs stores within Cali- 
fornia. The union says it wishes to make 
tough times easier on consumers after the 
destructive wildfires of the past few weeks. 
According to the union, Ralphs has been 
the most flexible during negotiations and 
its main targets are Albertsons and Vons. 

This is an interesting change of opin- 
ion. Just a few weeks ago, before talks 
all but stalled, Ralphs was declared to be 
just as evil and greedy as the other two 
grocery chains. Now. after over a month 
of picketing, the story has changed for the 
umpteenth time. 

First, according lo initial stories, Vons 
and company had decided they could no 
longer afford to pay for their employees' 
health insurance. Then we found out that 
it was only a small sum that employees 
were being asked to contribute. After that, 
the focus of the strike was shifted to future 
workers whose benefits were in jeopardy. 
Then, it turned out that no changes of any 
great significance were being proposed. 



Next, the union played the minority 
card. It painted a picture of the poor, single 
mother of three who would have to go on 
welfare because she could not afford to pay 
even a small amount for her health care. 
This type of person may exist in the union, 
but there are not many. 

Of course, all the while, the union 
has maintained that Vons, Albertsons and 
Ralphs are the major sources of the prob- 
lem. They even went so far as to sue Alb- 
ertsons and Ralphs for locking employees 
out. 

Now, in a time of great destruction in 
California, the union has stooped so low as 
to cite the wildfires as their reason for "re- 
opening" Ralphs to the public. The union 
is obviously desperate, and this move 
truly shows how badly public opinion has 
slipped from its side. 

Over the past few weeks, it has be- 
come increasingly obvious that this strike 
is a money-making issue, not a humanitar- 
ian effort. If it were the latter, the striking 
employees would be back at work with 
only slight changes made from their previ- 
ous contract. 

Yet, as of today, they remain on the 
street with no benefits and very little pay. 
The union does not want you to see the 
real motivation behind this move. Like an 
assassin hiding in the shadows, the union 
has developed a plot to drive the dagger 
deeper into the stores' hearts, all the while 
using the victims of the wildfires to cover 
its tracks. 

Why pick Ralphs? It comes down to 
this: Ralphs has the lowest amount of Cali- 
fornia business out of the three chains. 



Obviously, since the strike was origi- 
nated against Vons, there was no way the 
union could pick Vons to re-open, though 
if it were actually looking out for the con- 
venience of the consumers, as it says it is, 
Vons would have been the best choice be- 
cause most consumers already shop there. 
The same could be said for Albertsons, 
whose level of business also exceeds that 
of Ralphs. 

In the end, Ralphs is the least threaten- 
ing financial entity and the perfect pawn to 
use against Albertsons and Vons. Custom- 
ers have been crossing picket lines, and as 
the strike has worn on, it has chipped away 
at consumer patience to the point that more 
and more people are starting to ignore the 
picket lines and go back to their normal 
routines. 

This is the worst thing that could hap- 
pen to the union. If consumers begin to 
ignore the lines and the stores start to func- 
tion near their normal level, there will be 
no room to negotiate anything in the labor 
dispute. The union will lose. 

In fact, if the strike continues much 
longer, many of the striking employees 
will find work elsewhere. The union is now 
in danger of losing members' confidence, 
money and even its members themselves. 

So with great craftiness, the union is 
attempting to once again shut Vons and 
Albertsons down by opening Ralphs to 
the public. They are not giving up much to 
make this happen, since Ralphs is the least 
of their worries. 

Their thinking is that if Ralphs is open, 
the people who would rather not cross the 
picket lines will shop at Ralphs instead of 



the other two stores. As a side result, this 
will cause many products at the stores to go 
bad, resulting in a huge loss of money. 

Since the teamsters have been hon- 
oring the picket lines and not delivering 
products, the shelves will thin out in Vons 
and Albertsons. driving even more custom- 
ers away. 

Pretty clever, but judging by how 
things have gone, it should only take the 
public about a week to figure out the truth, 
and the union will be forced to scramble 
again. It's losing the battle that it started. 

My guess is that this strike wilt not last 
much longer. The union cannot afford to let 
it. It is not in it for the members or the com- 
munity; it is in it to make money, and if it 
doesn't hurry and clean up its mess, there 
will not be much money to make. 

1 urge you to go back to your routines. 
The picket lines are fading. We, as con- 
sumers, can help end this strike, and hope- 
fully as a result, get these union members 
back to work. 

In fact, I've talked to more than a few 
who want nothing more than to get back 
to work. 

Truthfully, many of these people are 
striking only because they have to. The al- 
ternative is to lose their place in the union 
and, consequently, their jobs. They do not 
deserve this. 

We have the power to shop where we 
want, not where the union wants us to, and 
to show the union that we aren't falling for 
its lies. It will not take much to push the 
union to back down and end this. Support 
the stores, and in the end you'll be support- 
ing the out-of-work employees. 



Studying abroad is easier than you think 



By Jon Aquisti 

COl UMNIST 



As the world becomes more com- 
petitive and the job market requires further 
specialization, now is the time to study 
abroad. 

The experiences that one can 
receive in another country, whether per- 
sonal or educational, can dramatically 
change the educational process. 

Learning about a subject in person in- 
stead of reading from a textbook inscribes 
the knowledge far better then a pop quiz 
or final exam could ever attempt. Going 
out into the world and studying abroad is 
now becoming a popular means of educa- 
tion among college students. So, why isn't 
everyone studying abroad? 

I believe it is because many students 



do not know the basic facts about study- 
ing abroad. First and foremost, it is quite 
cheaper than a semester at CLU {depend- 
ing on which program you choose). CLU 
does, in fact, offer a wide variety of pro- 
grams that allow students to travel and 
learn in many different parts of the world. 

The cool thing about CLU is that you 
do not necessarily need to use a CLU- 
approved program to go where you desire. 
In fact, many students pick and choose a 
program that fits their personality. 

In the spring semester of 2004, I will 
be lucky enough to study abroad in Rome, 
Italy. This has been a process that has been 
continuous for almost a year now. 

After searching the CLU Study 
Abroad website, there were no programs 
that sparked my interest. After searching 
on the internet, starting with the country 



1 desired, then searching study abroad 
programs within it. I was able to compile 
a list of universities and programs that 
suited me. 

When students do not use a program 
affiliated with their home university, things 
tend to be a little more stressful, but that 
stress is a good thing. There is much more 
paperwork required and more drive needed 
by the student to grab hold of the opportu- 
nity, but it is well worth it in the end. 

CLU does a wonderful job in assist- 
ing any needs you have in order to make a 
study abroad dream come true. Dr. Gooch, 
the registrar, your adviser, practically any- 
one who can assist you, will. These people 
all have contributed to my efforts in study- 
ing abroad. 

There needs to be more emphasis put 
into the study-abroad programs at CLU. If 



more people knew that studying abroad is a 
realistic event, more would do it! 

If students knew that they could 
travel to other parts of the nation, or 
even the world, and learn what can 
not be taught in books here, the numbers 
of study abroad students would grow dra- 
matically. 

Rome is going to be an experience that 
I cannot even imagine. As a history major. 
I know that the experiences in Rome will 
stick with me throughout my job search, 
as well as the rest of my life. This is an 
opportunity that cannot be anything but 
life-changing. 

If you are serious about studying 
abroad, contact the Study Abroad office 
at x3750 or your faculty adviser. Anyone 
at CLU is willing to help you make it a 
reality. 



Congress passes partial-birth abortion ban 



By Brian Roberts 

ClH UMNIST 



When it comes lo politics, there are 
many issues that people not involved in 
the political world agree on. Even though 
conservatives and liberals stood on oppo- 
site ends during the war on Iraq, over 60 
percent of the nation supported the action. 

When tax cuts became an issue this 

"past year, an overwhelming majority 

supported the legislature. However, one 

topic that splits almost everyone down the 

middle is abortion. 

Two weeks ago, conservatives had a 
huge win on Capitol Hill when Congress 
decided to ban partial-birth abortion. The 
issue has been brought to the surface again 



with legal battles on the horizon to fight 
the ruling. 

On Nov. 5, President Bush signed the 
bill into law -a bill which had already been 
vetoed twice by Clinton during his term. 

The surprising data from Congress' 
decision is not that the procedure was 
banned, but that the final vote came in at 
64-34. 

In a decision rumored to come down 
to Vice President Dick Cheney's vote. 
Congress surprised the nation; but even 
more so, Democrats shocked Republicans. 
Seventeen Democrats jumped to the right 
wing and followed the ban all the way to 
its passing. 

So what does this mean for abortion? 
About 30 states have enacted their own 
versions of partial-birth abortion bans, but 



in many cases they have been overturned 
in court. 

However, under federal law now, doc- 
tors cannot perform the procedure. 

Any doctor who defies the new law 
and performs the procedure is subject to 
fines and up to two years in prison. 

Although the measure is being chal- 
lenged by the ACLU, which fought against 
patriotism in this country after 9/11, and 
Planned Parenthood, which actually helps 
mothers get an abortion rather than actu- 
ally giving birth to their child, it will take 
up to three years before a final ruling is 
dealt. 

Could this be why Democrats have fil- 
ibustered four of the Bush administration's 
Supreme-Court Justice nominees? 

Well, finally Republicans are fighting 



back. 

Last week. Congress held a 30-hour 
"talkathon" to bring the nation's attention 
to Democrats unwilling to appoint jii\ 
Bush-backed justice. 

Abortiwn faces legal battles for the 
next couple of years. If reelected, Presideni 
Bush is slated to ask Congress to eradicate 
all abortion. 

And if his justices are appointed to the 
Supreme Court, a conservative's dream 
could become a reality, just as liberals' 
dreams did back in 1973. 

"I see where this is going," Sen. Tom 
Harkin. D-lowa. said. "A couple of vote 
here or there in the next election, you can 
kiss Roe v. Wade goodbye." 

A conservative can only hope and pra> 
this comes true. 



8 The Echo 



Sports 



November 19, 2003 



Kingsmen break records and Poets 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
football team concluded the 2003 season 
with a record of 5-4 and took second place 
in conference after trouncing the Whittier 
College Poets 70-13. 

It was the end of an era for the seniors 
who dedicated themselves to the program, 
and an extra-special day for wide receiver 
Jimmy Fox, who broke the school's all- 
time record for most career catches. Fox 
had 10 receptions in the game to bring his 
total to 1 76. overtaking previous record- 
holder Mike Hagen. 

"I feel very fortunate to have been able 
to stay healthy for most of my career." Fox 
said. "I just tried to help the team any way I 
could, and we had a successful season with 
a great group of guys." 

CLU also broke the school record for 
the most points in a game. 

Whittier received the opening kickoff 
and managed two first downs, but found 
themselves in a long yardage situation af- 
ter a sack by Casey O'Brian. Whittier then 
downed a punt inside the 5-yard line. 

CLU was forced to punt. Whittier took 
advantage of the good field position and 
went ahead 7-0, but that was all for the 
Poets in the first half. 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Seniors Jeremy Watties and Eddie Torres celebrate after Watties 'touchdown catch in the 
Kingsmen's 70-1 3 victory over Whittier. It was the final game for 19 Kingsmen seniors. 

CLU's offense caught fire and scored 
six touchdowns before the half. Casey 
Preston led the onslaught, scoring on a 1- 



yard quarterback sneak. 

Preston found Fox, who made a diving 
catch in the end zone for the second score. 

The next score was a slant to Alex 



Gonzales, followed by Tyler Ruiz taking a 
handoff straight ahead for the touchdown. 

Kicker Alex Espinoza got into the act 
and stole the show as he split the uprights 
on a 52-yard field goal. 

Charlie Brown got a touchdown from 
six yards. 



Women in sports panel tackle issues of student-athletes 



By Lindsey Rarick 
Staff Writer 



Women representing soccer, volley- 
ball, basketball and track participated in 
the panel discussion on the issues of being 
a woman, a student and an athlete. 

Dr. Greg Freeland, a California Lu- 
theran University political science pro- 
fessor, organized a panel of eight female 
student-athletes for the Nov. 7 discussion. 

The panel discussion addressed what 
kinds of adjustments student-athletes must 
make to juggle academics and sports par- 
ticipation. 

"Being in a sport forces you to priori- 
tize and manage your time better," senior 
Dereem McKinney said. 

Freshman soccer player Ashley War- 
muth talked about her challenging soccer 
schedule with two games per week, one 
home and one away. 

Warmuth suggested that spending less 
time with friends, planning ahead and get- 
ting phone numbers from friends in classes 

Water Polo drops three 
at SCIAC Tournament 



are good ways to help cope with the de- 
manding schedule. 

Next, the female student-athletes re- 
sponded to a question regarding overcom- 
ing injuries. 

Freshman soccer player Belinda Alar- 
con had shoulder surgery six months ago, 
yet has fought through the season during 
her recovery. 

"An injury really puts you down. It 
takes a toll on you physically and emotion- 
ally," Alarcon said. "It makes you appre- 
ciate life a lot more and makes you look 
at friends and see who's there and who's 
not." 

Junior volleyball player Brionna 
Morse told about her experience sitting 
in the whirlpool for 15 minutes, getting 
ultrasound treatment and doing physical 
therapy before each practice. 

"It's totally worth all the pain and all 
the suffering to be there. To play through 
it makes you stronger as a person," Morse 
said. 

The panel addressed concerns regard- 
ing burnout and pressure from parents. 



"I don't think it's the sport you get 
bumed out in, I think it's the experience, 
including players, coaches, and parents," 
volleyball player Jessica Haggerty said. 

The majority of the female athletes 
believed that their parents put just as much 
pressure on them as they would on a male 
athlete. 

"My parents told me, 'If you're not go- 
ing to play a sport in college, you might as 
well find a full-time job," basketball player 
Barbara "Oe" Zevale said. 

Overall, Freeland thought the discus- 
sion went very well. 

"Parents from the community brought 
high school kids here and part of the dis- 
cussion was to inspire other female stu- 
dent-athletes." Freeland said. 

The CLU female athletes were happy 
to voice their opinions and personal experi- 
ences in such a discussion. 

"I really didn't know what to expect, 
and it was a well-rounded talk about wom- 
en in sports," freshman volleyball player 
Melissa Jimro said. 



XC season ends at NCAA Regionals 



By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 



By Devon Bostock 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen water polo team 
ended its season with tiiree losses at the 
SCIAC tournament this weekend. 

The Kingsmen's first loss was on 
Friday against defending conference 
champions Redlands by a score of 18- 
3. Two of the Kingsmen's goals were 
scored by Mark Nielsen, followed by a 
goal scored by Jamie Aronson. 

On Saturday, the Kingsmen lost to 
Whittier 16-4, and they fell to Caltech in 
a close overtime battle on Sunday. The 
Kingsmen finished their season with a 
0- 1 8 record. 

Coach Craig Rond and the rest of the 
Kingsmen hope to come back in the next 
season stronger and more experienced. 



Selected runners from California Lu- 
theran University's cross country teams 
competed in the NCAA West Regionals in 
Portland, Ore., over the past weekend. 

The men's team placed 13th out of 14 
qualifying teams with a score of 310. The 
top placing SCIAC team was Pomona- 
Pitzer in fourth with a score of 105. 

Out of five other SCIAC teams com- 
peting, CLU was only able to beat Caltech, 
who placed 14th. 

Tyler Ross led the Kingsmen with a 
28th place finish and a time of 26:48.1. 
John Cummings was 53rd with a time of 
27:39.4 and Scott Siegfried was 75th with 
a time of 28:26.2. 

Other times for CLU were: Grady Guy 
at 28:46.8, Anthony Knode at 29:36.9, 



Aaron Hutchison at 29:49.2 and Andy 
Miller at 32:08.5. Overall, there were 102 
runners in the men's race. 

The women placed 13th out of 15 
qualifying teams with a score of 336. SCI- 
AC opponent Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 
placed second with a score of 79. As on 
the men's side, the women were also able 
to defeat Caltech as well as nonconference 
rival Chapman University. 

Heather Worden was the lead runner 
for the Regals, placing 55th with a time 
of 24:27.5. She was followed by Carly 
Sandell in 63rd 24:43.9 and Kristy Fisher 
in 67th at 24:54.0. Other CLU times were: 
Amanda Klever at 26:03.4, Emma Holman 
at 26:3 1 .4 and Julie Miller at 27:32.9. 

None of the CLU runners were able to 
advance to the NCAA Nationals in Indiana 
in two weeks, thus ending the 2003 cross 
country season. 



The defense even managed to figure 
into the scoring on an interception by Joey 
Stein. 

The Kingsmen led 45-7 at the half. 

The second half was more of the same. 
Chad Brown carried the ball in for a 1 -yard 
score. 

Preston threw a 5-yard strike to Gabe 
Solberg, who made a catch with a broken 
wrist. 

CLU got a safety after a bad snap on 
the punt. 

Jeremy Wattis scored a touchdown on 
a short carry and Alex Espinoza hit a 32- 
yard field goal to make the score 70-7. 

"This has been a fun year. We came 
up a little short, but Cal Lutheran football 
has been a good experience for me and I'll 
always be a Kingsman," safety Pat Casteel 
said. 

Whittier mustered up another score, 
but missed the extra point, making the final 
score 70-13. 

"We played well today. It was nice 
to see a lot of the guys who have worked 
hard for all these years go out with a big 
win. Jimmy Fox had a great career and it's 
a big accomplishment for him to get that 
record," Coach Scott Squires said. "We 
had a good year. We hoped it would have 
been a little better, but I was real proud of 
this team." 



Kingsmen/Regals 

All-SCIAC Selections 

& Awards 

First Team All-SCIAC 
Havard Aschim, Men's Soccer 
Bonnie Bornhauser, Women's Soccer 
Dean Klipfel, Men's Soccer 

Second Team All-SCIAC 

Greg Allen, Men's Soccer 
Deanna Dean, Women's Soccer 
Denise French, Women's Soccer 
Katie Schneider, Volleyball 

SCIAC Award of Distinction 

Pam Clark, Women's Soccer 



IM Sports 



Flag Football 
Results Nov. 16 

Bad Boys 38, Kentucky Straight 18 
Aquafina 39, Death Inc. 32 

Championship Game 
Nov. 23 

3 p m. 

Bad Boys vs Aquafina 

@ Mt. Clef Stadium 

Volleyball 
Results Nov. 1 3 

Wilson def. Shooting Stars 
MJ2KRBS7def Minna 
Chivos y Chivas def. Aces Wild 
Bust a Move Groove def The Buttons 

Results Nov. 16 

Chivos y Chivas def. MJ2KRBS7 
Wilson def Bust a Move Groove 

Championship Game 
Nov. 20 

9 p.m. 

Chivos y Chivas vs. Wilson 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 44, No. 1 1 


60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


November 26, 2003 


Sports 


Arts 


News 


Former CLU pitcher Jason Hirsh 


Jazz and Wind Ensemble impress audience with their 


School of Education hopes for 


has the 4th-ranked fastball among 


improvisational skills. 


NCATE accreditation. 


2003 MLB draft picks. 






See story page 8 


See story page 5 


See story page 3 



Yearbooks will return 



By Kyle Wells 
Staff Writer 



This year, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity students will not be receiving the usual 
yeardisc CD, but an actual paper-bound 
yearbook. 

The change to a yearbook from a CD 
came about with the help of David Gran- 
nis, director of educational technology at 
CLU. He felt that CDs were becoming 
outdated too fast. 

"There are just too many changes 
in computer technology happening that 
it makes it hard for people to view their 
discs after they have upgraded to newer 



software, " Grannis said. 

Another major factor that played a part 
in the change was that a book would al- 
ways be accessible, whereas technological 
advances will surpass the era of the CD. 

"A book will be much better than a CD 
because, in 20 years, I see myself thumb- 
ing through a book and not using a CD," 
said Julie Cole, CLU student and member 
of the yearbook staff. 

The CLU yearbook staff is also prepar- 
ing a DVD for the students of CLU. The 
DVD will be part of the yearbook and will 
contain video footage and images of CLU 
athletic teams and clubs. The yearbook 
staff wanted to keep student pictures and 



because of cost. 

Currently, the only problem the staff 
has encountered has been the lack of sup- 
port from the student body. ■ With the de- 
clining reputation of the old CD yearbook, 
students are hesitant to volunteer to get 
their picture taken. 

The new CLU yearbook will be pre- 
sented to the student free from the Media 
Services Department. In the past, students 
had to pay for their yearbooks, which even- 
tually led to the yearbook's demise. The 
total cost for this year's yearbook will be 
approximately $8,000 for the books and 
$1,500 for the DVDs. 

Funds for the yearbook and DVD are 



The yearbook staff wants to collect enough 
money to hand the yearbook out for free. 

The yearbook will contain black-and- 
white student photos. Everything else will 
be contained in the DVD, which the year- 
book staff will also produce. 

"This is a kind of trial year to see 
how people like the yearbook and DVD," 
Cole said. 

The trial run will give the yearbook 
staff information about what to change, 
and if the students of CLU like having a 
book versus a CD. 

"All we need is the student support to 
make the new yearbook better," said Pat- 
rick Mason, CLU student and member of 



events like athletics and clubs separate coming out of Media Services' budget, the yearbook staff. 



visitation Karaoke draws students 

policy to be 
reviewed 



By Brian Roberts 
Staff Writer 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 



Brooke Rafdal. president of Old 
West, is heading up a committee to re- 
view the visitation policy on campus. 

"What we are proposing is to keep 
the current policy Sunday through 
Thursday, but change weekends, 
Friday and Saturday, to 24 hours," 
Rafdal said. 

No changes have been made yet, 
but RHA has voted to present the 
proposal to Angela Naginey, Mike 
Fuller, Bill Rosser and Sally Sagen on 
Tuesday, Nov. 25. 

In other business last week, RHA 
approved Director Alex Mallen's ap- 
pointment of Dave Dom as Thompson 
Hall president and Tim Gustafson 
as Thompson Hall programmer. 
Thompson's previous president and 
programmer had to step down early 
last month. 

Two weeks ago, Suzie Roslund, 
National Communication Coordinator 
for California Lutheran University 
attended the Pacific Affiliation of Col- 
lege and University Residence Halls 
conference. Roslund presented CLU's 
"Battle of the Sexes" and "Service in a 
Box" for program of the year. 

"Neither of our programs won. but 
"Battle of the Sexes' was very' close 
to winning, and we had a great time," 
said Roslund. 

Pensack-Rinehart also announced 
the winners of the "Of the Month" pro- 
gram on Monday. Holly Hoppman won 
student of the month and Katy Wilson 
won resident assistant of the month. 



"It's amusing to' watch people sing, 
regardless of how good they are," sopho- 
more Samantha Freid said at karaoke 
and doughnut night, part of California 
Lutheran University's weekly Club Lu 
event, sponsored by ASCLU. 

An estimated 80-100 CLU students 
attended the event in the Student Union 
Building. Students sang karaoke and ate 
complimentary Krispy Kreme doughnuts. 

"I came because I needed to relax 
after a whole week of studying." sopho- 
more Rachael Hanewinckel said. "I came 
with my friends, and we are kicking back 
and enjoying the [students] who are sing- 
ing." 

She cringed at the thought of singing, 
saying that she was a horrible singer and 
would only embarrass herself if she did. 

"Me, sing? Are you kidding? Huh, 
that's a joke," Hanewinckel said. L i can 
only imagine what 1 would sound like if 
I did [sing]." 

Patrick Ellingsworth took full ad- 
vantage of the karaoke theme in a 
performance that Hanewinckel said 




Junior C.J. Kridner and senior Chris H miser 

was "awesome." 

"I was studying and thought that it 
would be fun to take a break." Elling- 
sworth said. "1 came to rock the place!" 

Ellingsworth performed "Dead Man's 
Party" by the 1980s rock band Oingo Bo- 
ingo. He said that he picked this particular 
song because he thought that it would be a 
crowd-pleaser. 

"The crowd was feeling me and I was 



Photograph by Rachael Carver 
sing 'N Sync's "It's Gonna Be Me. " 

feeling the crowd," he said. "Nobody else, 
including my roommate, was going to do 
it. So I decided to take up the slack." 

Overall, the night was fun and veered 
students' minds away from studying, 
Hanewinckel said. 

No Club Lu event is scheduled this 
Friday due to Thanksgiving. However, on 
Dec. 5, Club Lu activities reconvene with 
ice skating. 



Ramadan and Thanksgiving observed 



By Brian Roberts 
Staff Writer 



The International Marketing Class 
celebrated Ramadan and Thanksgiving 
together this year. "How You Celebrate 
Giving Thanks from East to West" 
brought the two holidays together for 
dinner last week in the Nelson Room and 
was funded by the Center of Leadership 
and Values. 

The event marked the rare occasion 
when the two holidays fall on the same day. 

Ramadan, which is observed in 
Middle Eastern culture, is the ninth 
month of the Muslim calendar. It is dur- 
ing this month that Muslims observe the 



Fast of Ramadan. 

During the entire month, Muslims 
fast during the daylight hours and eat 
small meals in the evening. 

Thanksgiving celebrates the gather- 
ing of the pilgrims' first harvest after 
landing on Plymouth Rock in 1620. The 
first actual Thanksgiving happened in 
1621, a year after their arrival. 

This year, the end of Ramadan and 
Thanksgiving falls on the same day. 
This affair only occurs once every 50 
years. 

Seniors Katie Hunt and Andrew 
Robison were the managers behind the 
project and brought in all the aspects 
of the night. Religion, professor Dr. 
Jarvis Streeter gave the opening bless- 



ing, followed by the main speaker for 
the event, professor of economics Dr. 
Jamshid Damooei. Around 85-90 people 
including students, faculty and commu- 
nity, signed up to take part in the event 
promoting the two cultural holidays. 

"It was very successful." Hunt said. 
"Attendance is what we expected. The 
people really enjoyed themselves and 
the food was exceptional." 

Food for the event included tradi- 
tional dishes from both holidays. The 
event was catered by the Mediterranean 
restaurant Ali Baba in Newbury Park. 

"The understanding of the two cul- 
tures came across very well," Hunt said. 
"This is only a one time deal because of 
the rare occasion." 



2 Till: Echo 



Calendar 



NOVEMBER 26. 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

november 26 



Worship 

Chapel 

10:10a.m. 

Thanksgiving Break 

1:30 p.m. 



Saturday 

november 29 



Kingsmen Basketball vs. V. of Mary 

Gym 

7:30 p.m. 



monday 

november 1 



Classes Resume 

7:30 a.m. 

Toys for Tots 

SUB 

All Day 




I 

s 






ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 

tuesday 

november 2 



Kingsmen Baskethall vs. West Coast 
Baptist Bible College 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 

Psychology Club Meeting 

Mogen Hall 
8 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen I 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 



Toys for Tots 

Sub 

All Day 

Brown Bag Series 

WRC 

12 p.m. 



^^L. 

*W* 




IS 



Tutors Needed: S15-$18/hr. Bright, enthusiastic people 

to teach one-on-one. in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal & 

Academic subjects in your area of expertise. We 11 train. 

Flexible scheduling- Trans, req. We tutor students throughout 

L.A. & the Valley. Mail, fax. or email cover letter and resumed 

Include standardized lest scores (SAT I/I I, GRE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume" to: 

(310) 282-6424 

or email resume 1 to: 

instruetorhiring6@aeeeducation.com 



Classified ads can 
be placed on the 
Calendar page for a 
flat rate regardless of 
word count. Discount 
available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are 
subject to editing for 
content 8c clarity. 
Call: 
(805) 493-3865 



Rain, Rain Go Away so 
Cafe a la Cart can Stay! 




1 



On rainy days, Cafe a la Cart will be 
closed as an electrical precaution. 



Asian Club and Friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and 
FRIENDS! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori. president 

(SIS) 590-7625 



Stmlewts' Omsbudspersons 

CLU's faculty omsbudspersons for student concerns arc available to 

help students resolve problems or conflicts that they may be having 

with faculty in a confidential and unofficial manner. 

Youron-campus omsbudspersons are: 

Dr. Eva Ramirez, Spanish Dr. Charles Hall, Sociology 

Office: Humanities 232 Office: G-15 

Phone: (805) 493-3349 Phone: (805) 493-343 7 

Dr. I)i nun n Pagliasolti, Communication 

Office: SBET 119 

Phone:(805)493-3374 

Don't let conflict ruin \our learning experience: contact one of these thtee professors today! 



Remember that time you boogie-boarded down the muddy slopes of 

Kingsmen Park during the rain & ate tree to save yourself from the 

raging creek? 

Want to share great experiences like that with future students? 

Take Cal Lutheran Home for the Holidays! 

To sign up, or to get more information, please call Liz or Beckie at x3880. 

Dude ... that was pretty funny ... 



BLACK STUDENT 
UNION 

Meetings are held every 

MONDA Y at 5:15 p.m. 

in the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, 
AND FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Pryor Hall 

(805) 493-3951 

(BSU Adviser) 



Where are YOU 
going? 




Come find out more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-o 
X37SO 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon - Fri. 

11:30-1:20 






Come hear DAVID GIST 

from "BREAD FOR THE WORLD" 

on November 26th at 10:10 a.m. 

in Samuelson Chapel talk 

about what we can do to 

help the undernourished 

around the globe 




"We live in an interconnected 

world today ... Yet there are many 

hungry people throughout the world 

who never get into the news, making 

it easy for us to lose sight of what 

many other people go through each 

day. ... These people are just as 

worthy in God's eyes as we are, 

and yet we hardly even know they 

exist. I see these people in poor 

countries working to better their 

lives, and eager to correct their 

own problems. 

As people of faith, we know 

God's call to care for those who 

are suffering. It is time for an , 

increased commitment to reducing 

hunger, with rich and poor 

countries working together. We 

know what needs to be done. ... We 

need to put words into action." 
-Jimmy Carter 
Former President 
2002 Nobel Peace Prize recipient 



Hungry for the Word? 



When Friday rolls around, we tend 
to feel a big sigh of relief that we 
have survived qet another week. 
With all the busy schedules that 
accompany our lives, it helps to have 
a few moments set aside each week, 
to feast on God's Word. Join us this 
and every Friday at 12 noon for a 
half-hour Devotional Cuchanst in 
the Meditation Chapel. 

Want to know more? Call the Campus 
Ministry office atx3228. 



November 26, 2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



School of Ed. reviewed 



By Erick Elhard 
Stapf Writer 



To increase the status and attractive- 
ness of California Lutheran University for 
current and future students, the university's 
School of Education invited the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education to campus last week. The main 
advantage to CLU of winning NCATE ac- 
creditation is that it will facilitate state-to- 
state credential transference for graduates. 

Unlike many accreditation processes, 
seeking NCATE accreditation was a vol- 
untary undertaking, set underway more 
than two years ago by former dean Carol 
Bartell; current acting dean of the School 
of Education, Dr. Mildred Murray-Ward; 
the acting associate dean. Dr. Julia Sieger; 
and other faculty, staff and administrators. 
The first step was to prove, in written form. 



"We have to have an 
assesment system that 
shows we're doing a 
good job for the program 
and the students." 

Dr. Julia Sieger 
Acting Associate Dean 

that the School of Education meets the six 
NCATE standards, which include faculty 
qualifications, unit governance and diver- 
sity of field experience. 

"We have to have an assessment sys- 
tem that shows we're doing a good job 
for the program and the students," Sieger 
said. 

After reviewing the written docu- 
mentation, a panel of NCATE examiners 



visited campus to analyze the program. 
The panel arrived at CLU on Sunday, Nov. 
16, and was treated to a reception at uni- 
versity President Luther Luedtke's home. 
Following this was a poster presentation 
and informal mingling session at which 
NCATE members became acquainted with 
students and faculty involved the educa- 
tion program. 

"The [NCATE] team told us that ev- 
eryone here was so gracious and helpful 
with this effort," Sieger said. 

On Monday and Tuesday of last week, 
NCATE visited schools in Thousand 
Oaks and surrounding areas where CLU 
graduates were teaching or current CLU 
students were accumulating their student 
teaching hours. NCATE officials also ap- 
praised education classes to evaluate their 
quality and effectiveness. On Tuesday 
evening, the team convened to write its 



response to what it had seen and met with 
Murray-Ward the next morning to discuss 
preliminary findings. The six standards 
were met, but the panel will construct and 
send a final report to NCATE's home office 
in Washington, D.C. 

The board there will let CLU know 
of its final decision in March or April of 
2004. 

'it was a challenging experience, but 
one that gave us great ideas about how we 
can improve our quality," said Dr. Gail 
Uellendahl. director of the counseling and 
guidance program. 

"[The NCATE process] was beneficial 
because [CLU students'] credentials are 
looked on more highly throughout the 
country," said Dr. Leah Hemer, assistant 
professor of special education. "Also, it's 
a rigorous process, so our program gets 
better by going through it." 



Ritch Eich gets ready to brand CLU 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 



Ritch K. Eich became vice president 
for Marketing and Communications at Cal- 
ifornia Lutheran University in late July. 

Eich is in charge of creating and imple- 
menting a communications and marketing 
program to increase CLU's image locally 
and nationally. 

"We're taking a marketing approach 
in changes we're making'at CLU. We're 
driven by data and we're making changes 
according to solid research," Eich said. 

He oversees the offices and staff of 
University Relations. Public Information, 
Publications, Special Events and Sports 
Information, He also oversees the CLU 
website and the university's award-win- 
ning NPR station, KCLU-FM. 

Eich has been working closely with 
the Facilities Department to beautify the 
campus and get rid of some of the "uglies" 
that may deter people from CLU. He has 
conducted walk-throughs and identified 
areas of rust and chipping paint. 

"Ritch brings to the university not 
only strong experience in branding, com- 
munications and public affairs, but also 
an important strategic mindset," said 
President Luther Luedtke. "We are looking 
forward to Ritch playing a major role in 



institutional planning and the creation of a 
strong, clear 'brand' for CLU." 

Eich began his job at CLU by chang- 
ing the name of the Public Information 
department to Media Relations, better 
reflecting the purpose of the department. 
Eich wants to enhance the media attention 
CLU gets and increase its visibility among 
other schools, as well. 

"This school is a pretty incredible 
place, and I don't think it has received the 
attention it deserves. I am eager to change 
that," Eich said. 

A recurring concern on campus has 
been CLU's lack of a solid mascot or iden- 
tifying character; CLU currently has two 
mascots. Eich is looking into creating a 
new, unifying character, so the school will 
be more widely recognized. 

"I look forward to seeing a thought- 
ful examination of the mascot issue, but 
it definitely has to be a student initiative 
for any action to take place," Eich said in a 
presentation to faculty and administrators 
last week. 

Eich has served as chief of communi- 
cations and public affairs at Stanford Uni- 
versity Medical Center, During the 2002- 
2003 year, the public affairs department 
at Stanford won more than 10 awards for 
excellence in media relations, bioterrorism 
preparedness, writing, publications and vi- 




l'hi)tt)i;r;)nli by Sara! 

New vice president for Marketing and Communications Ritch Eich settles in to his new 
office and prepares to make CLU more widely recognized. 



sual design. Those awards were presented 
by the Association of American Medical 
Colleges and the Council for the Advance- 
ment and Support of Education. Eich also 
helped to build Stanford's medical science 
journalism fellowship program for news- 
paper, radio and television reporters and 
editors. The program has attracted interest 
from such news organizations as the Los 
Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, 
NBC Nightly News, the San Francisco 
Chronicle and CNN. 

Eich has also served as head of public 
relations for Blue Shield of California, 



held executive positions at Indiana Univer- 
sity Medical Center and the University of 
Michigan and served as admissions dean at 
Pomona College in Claremont, Calif. 

Eich holds a doctorate in organiza- 
tional behavior and communications from 
the University of Michigan and he serves 
on the board of directors of the University 
of California, Merced, and on the editorial 
board of the publication "Strategic Health- 
care Marketing." He is a public affairs cap- 
tain in the Naval Reserve and has been an 
active member in Rotary, Ronald McDon- 
ald House and chambers of commerce. 



Jesus is Coming! 

WELS Campus Ministry and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church invite you to 

join them for confessional Lutheran Bible Class and Worship. . 

The Sunday morning Bible Class at 8:30am is studying the life of Abraham. 

Through Abraham, God foreshadows the world's salvation in Jesus Christ. 

Just as God provided the sacrifice for Abraham and Isaac, He provides you 

with Jesus Christ - the" Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world", 

Bible Class is followed by traditional Worship 

at 9:30am. Join with the Church this 

Advent season in preparing for Christ's 

coming! 

For more information on the WELS 
Campus Ministry, to join our e-mail 
list, or for a free devotional booklet, 
e-mail clu@princeofpeace-wels.org. 



g£" www.princeofpeace-wels.org 




POSTNET 

Park Oaks Shopping Center (Yen's Plaza) 
1710 N. Moorpark Rd.« Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 hxrs 

(805) 777-8866 • Fax: (805) 777-8868 » T F 2£S£ 

• Professional Packaging & Supples ■ Private Mailboxes (personal/business) • Greeting Cards 



US Postal Services 

• Fax Services 

• Pnnting Services (busirn 

fgd&j Authorized ShipCenler' 



• Large Format Copying 

• Photocopies 
j cards, etc) • Passport Photos 



* Notary Services 
- Bulk Mailing 

* Laminating 



WE ACCEPT Alt COMPETITORS' COUPONS SEttStfi 

i! 690 COLOR n 34B&W 
COPIES COPIES 

!' 8'// x 11. Single-sided. ' 



1 MONTH 
FREE 

with 3 month Mailbox j 1.24* paper. 



Rental 



Limit 100 



Limit 500 



«™ ltd': 



4 The Echo 



Features 



November 26. 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What are you doing for Thanksgiving break? 




Jared Clark, communication. 2007 



Mark Nielsen, business. 2005 



"I'm going to kick it with my bud- "[I'm going ] to eat a lot of turkey and 

dies and have an amazing dinner with my watch my sister play soccer." 
family at my grandma's house and think 
about poor Adam Jussel because he gave 
up meat." 



Alex Mallen, marketing/communication, Josie Franciose. communication, 2007 
2006 

"I am going home and going to see the ' "I'm going to Salt Lake City to see my 

family and relax." family and go snowboarding." 




Michael George, history, 2007 



Kristine Ritterbush, drama/sociology, 2004 Kim Eynon, biology, 2004 



Colin Cassuto. liberal studies. 2004 



"I'm going home and I'm going to "I have about seven papers to make up "I plan on spending it with my family "I'm going to go home and spend 

have lots of pumpkin pie and I'm going to and I'm going back to eating poultry and that I miss." Thanksgiving with my family and catch up 

see my friends." hanging out with my family, but mostly on homework." 

I'm doing homework." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Marybel Lopez. Photography by Danny Ermolovich. 



Ten tips for men and 
women on healthy skin 



New yoga instructor 
relaxes students and staff 



By Farima Nojoumi 
Staff Writer 



Winter often means spending time in 
centrally heated homes with low humidity. 
Knowing how skin functions and changing 
a few habits can be the difference between 
having a dull winter complexion and hav- 
ing a healthy glow. The following are tips 
for both men and women to safeguard your 
skin from the elements: 

1. DRINK WATER 

Keep bottles of spring water at home, 
work and in your car as a reminder to 
drink enough water throughout the day. 
Headache, fatigue, memory loss, dry skin 
and digestive problems can be caused by 
insufficient water intake. 

2. EXERCISE DAILY 

Even if you can only squeeze in a 
15-minute brisk walk during class breaks, 
do it! Your muscles will pump oxygenated 
blood into your tissues and organs helping 
to remove toxins from your body, burn 
calories, and energize your system. 

3. REDUCE STRESS 

Signs of stress can appear on your 



face. Do something you enjoy every day, 
as your face reflects what is going on in- 
side your mind. 

4. EAT HEALTHFULLY 

Eat raw foods as often as you can and 
cut back on caffeine, alcohol, sugar and 
carbohydrates. You are what you eat. 

5. USE MOISTURIZER 

Choose a moisturizer with zinc oxide 
and SPF 30. 

6. CLEAN PROPERLY 

Never go to bed with cosmetics on. 
Washing works to, first, remove dirt and 
cosmetics, and second, to wash your skin. 

7. EXFOLIATE WEEKLY 

Try a scrub using a tablespoon of sug- 
ar or oatmeal to remove dead skin cells. 

8. DO NOT SMOKE 

9. SLEEP 

Average adults need 7-8 hours of sleep 
each night to maintain their immunity. So 
get your beauty sleep! 

10. AVOID EXCESS SUN 

Protect your face and eyes every day 
by wearing SPF 30 sunblock and sunglass- 
es to protect from UVA/UVB rays. 



By Kelly Jones 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University has 
hired Adam Danikiewicz as its new 
yoga instructor. Those in the yoga com- 
munity call Danikiewicz "Vishnuprem," 
meaning "cosmic love." The name was 
given to Danikiewicz by Swami Vishnu- 
devananda, a disciple of a yoga master 
and modern day saint Swami Siuananda. 
He was given this name while studying 
at the International Sivananda Yoga 
Vedanta Centers (1SYVC), the largest 
yoga school in the world with 10,000 
students. 

Danikiewicz was born in Poland but 
has lived in the Western Hemisphere 
for the past 30 years. He currently lives 
in Ventura, Calif. He began studying 
yoga in the early 1980s by working as 
a volunteer staff member at ISYVC. He 
ran the San Francisco, Los Angeles and 
Chicago centers of ISYVC. He left the 
organization in 1996 and now makes 
his living teaching yoga around the 
Ventura area. 



"Yoga is a complete science of life 
which covers all aspects all of life's as- 
pects including the body. It is not just 
fitness, it is integrating the body and the 
mind," Danikiewicz said. 

In class, he focuses on the marriage 
of mind and body. He places a big em- 
phasis on meditation. 

"Meditation is the essential practice 
of the true path of yoga which leads to 
knowledge of who you truly are," Dani- 
kiewicz said. 

Yoga has gained widespread popu- 
larity as a way to become more flexible 
and relax. 

"I go to yoga to relax. More stu- 
dents should come," said junior Lucas 
Lembrick. 

Classes are held on Tuesday and 
Thursday at 3 p.m. in Nygreen I . Partic- 
ipants should bring a yoga mat or beach 
towel and wear comfortable clothing. 
Denim or jeans are not advised. The 
classes are sponsored by Student Life 
and Educational Programs. Please call 
or email Sally with any questions at 
sisagen@clunet.edu or ext. 3320. 



November 26, 2003 



Arts 



The Echo 5 



Jazz and wind ensembles improvise to impress audience 



By Kristina Sterling 
Stafi- Writer 



"Hidden Gems" was the theme of 
the University Wind Ensemble and Jazz 
Improvisation Ensemble performance 
was held in the Samuelson Chapel on 
Nov. 21. California Lutheran University 
music instructor Daniel Geeting was the 
conductor and director. 

The University Wind Ensemble is 
a group of approximately 40 members 
playing 16 different wind instruments. 
They started off the night with "Overture 
for Band," then broke in to "Four Mary- 
land Songs," with the vocals sung by- 
senior Kimberly Rupp. Afterward, they 
played "On a Hymn song of Philip Bliss" 
and "Fantasies on a Theme by Haydn." 

Some students attended the Wind 
Ensemble performance as pait of a re- 
quirement for their music appreciation 
class. 

"! really enjoyed the first song 
because of the melody, and I thought 
[Rupp] had a beautiful voice," freshman 



Holly Anfinsen said. 

Other attendees were the music 
band from Almondale Middle School, 
in Littlerock, Calif. Eighth-grader Trista 
Geary, who performs in her school band, 
came to see her music director who is a 
part of the University Wind Ensemble. 

"1 liked all of it because I'm in band 
and my band director is in there, and she 
does a really great job," Geary said. 

After the intermission, the CLU Jazz 
Improvisation Ensemble took the stage 
and played five different songs, "Tenor 
Madness/The Roving Third," the theme 
from "New York, New York," "Misty," 
"Impressions" and "Cantaloupe Island." 
The key element that made the perfor- 
mance unique is that the group plays 
the songs to a certain point, and the rest 
is improvised. In "Misty," Junior John 
Oakman, who plays the tenor saxophone, 
impressed the audience by doing an im- 
provised solo piece during the song. 

"it's amazing how [Oakman] can do 
that, and it really shows how talented he 
is." junior Sarah Bot said. 




Pholugrapli b\ Dan Norton 
Musical instructor, conductor and director Daniel Geeting leads the University Wind 
Ensemble and Jazz Improvisation Ensemble during the "Hidden Gems " performance- 



'Less than Jake' Brown Bag: Relationship between church and state 
concert left fans 
wanting more 

By Michael Cabral 
Staff Writer 



By Kaytie St. Pierre 
Staff Writer 



Less Than Jake, a well-known ska- 
punk band, performed at the House of 
Blues in Hollywood on Nov, 17. Despite 
a few setbacks, such as the trumpet player 
suffering a wrist injury and the most well- 
known opening act, Rufio. canceling five 
shows because of a death in the family. 
Less Than Jake delivered an intense set. 

For most people, ska has died out 
in recent years, and most bands that had 
horns, such as No Doubt and Hoobastank, 
got rid of them. However, Less Than Jake 
survived throughout the '90s amid grunge, 
pop punk and rap rock, and has released 
several albums. Anyone who has gone to 
Warped Tour knows that Less Than Jake 
puts on a great show and is performing 
right along other big names such as Rancid, 
Pennywise and The Atari's, 

Less Than Jake, from Gainesville. 
Fla., is made up of Vincent (drummer), 
Chris (guitar and vocals), Roger (bass), 
Buddy (trumpet) and JR (alto sax). 

The concert opened up with the band 
"ch ch ch ha ha a'' which takes its name 
after the sound from the "Friday the 13th" 
movies. Its 10-minute set was mediocre at 
best. Then pop punk/emo band Fallout Boy 
took the stage. This band probably had the 
best fan support of the three opening acts, 
but it sounded far too much of a mix be- 
tween Simple Plan and Dashboard Confes- 
sional. The band in place for Rufio was '80s 
metal rock band Bang Tango. 

Finally, Less Than Jake took the stage. 
Since it recently released its new album, 
•'Anthem." which has two songs playing 
on MTV, "She's Gonna Brake Soon," and 
"The Science of Selling Yourself Short," it 
would seem they would promote this CD on 
their tour. However, being crowed-p leasers, 
Less Than Jake played only two songs off 
"Anthem." Instead, the band played songs 
off of its other six big albums, including its 
first release in the early '90s, "Pezcore." 
Dedicated fans were screaming the lyrics 
at The House Of Blues. At the end of the 
night, everyone called for an encore. 

Don't let a good concert like this pass 
you by. Places like Sunset Boulevard in Los 
Angeles have clubs that feature bands you 
may love to see. Check the websites for The 
Roxy, The Whiskey and The Key Club. 



The controversial subject of the re- 
lationship between church and state was 
the theme for the Brown Bag discussion 
on Nov. 18. Dr. Charles Hall, chair of 
the sociology department at CLU. led the 
discussion on the controversy. 

"The real question is how much should 
the government regulate the overstepping 
of religion, and how much should religion 
regulate the overstepping of the govern- 
ment," Hall said. "When these roles are 
intertwined too much, there is bloodshed 
and oppression." 

The line of separation is ail in how one 
interprets the First Amendment is estab- 
lishment and free exercise clause. 

This clause is interpreted differently 
by many people. Chief Justice Rehnquist 
argues that there should be no establish- 
ment of a single national church or pref- 
erence of one religion over another. Most 
of the current members of the Supreme 
Court believe that the clause prohibits the 
government from promoting religion in 
general as well as a preference. 

"Society is moving religion to the mar- 



gins, taking it out of the public as much as 
possible," said Dr. Kateri Alexander, direc- 
tor of the Women's Resource Center. "We 
are creating hostility toward religion. I feel 
like our children are confused because the 
values taught at home are not being repre- 
sented in public places." 

Hall said the controversy was not re- 
" The real question is how much 
should the government regulate 
the overstepping of religion, 
and how much should religion 
regulate the overstepping of the 
government." 

Charles Hall 
Chair, sociology department 

ally pertinent until about 50 years ago. 
Before 1947, very few cases concerning 
the establishment and free exercise clause 
went to the Supreme Court. This was 
because the amendments only applied to 
the federal courts. The states could make 
whatever laws they wanted until the 14th 
Amendment was put into effect during the 
Civil War. 



At this time, many immigrants came to 
the United States, bringing many different 
religions to the predominantly Protestant- 
occupied country. 

"It seems that we are promoting athe- 
ism by taking God out of society," said 
freshman Michelle Ericson. "Now schools 
are teaching evolution, but even that is en- 
forcing certain views." 

The main part of the discussion was 
about the controversy of the Pledge of Al- 
legiance. 

"It wasn't until 1954 that 'Under God' 
was inserted to the pledge. At this time, it 
was not controversial because our country 
was very conservative," Hall said. 

"Children should still learn to speak 
kindly and look out for the world, instead 
of taking the values from the TV," said Al- 
exander. "I think it is scary." 

The next Brown Bag will be held on 
Dec. 2 from noon to I p.m. in the Women's 
Resource Center. The topic, "Ordinary 
Paper: Craft a 'Madonna and Child' Using 
Paper and Folding Techniques," will be 
lead by Pastor Melissa Maxwell-Doherty. 
All Brown Bags are open to both campus 
and community men and women. For more 
information, call ext. 3345. 



Blink 182's CD mixes instruments with mature lyrics 



By Lindsay Elliott 
Staff Writer 



Mentioning Blink 182 and The Cure 
in the same sentence is like mixing oil 
and water: it just doesn't happen. Until 
now. It has been over 10 years since 
Blink 182 began making its sophomoric, 
fun-loving melodies. Their newest, self- 
titled release (Geffen Records) is a bit 
different than what most people, espe- 
cially the 13-year-olds who spend $45 for 
a ticket to their concert, would expect. 

The members of Blink 1 82 are enor- 
mous fans of the well-respected band The 
Cure, which has influenced them greatly 
on this album. It seems that they are final- 
ly showing signs of growing up. In their 
song"All of This," Robert Smith, vocalist 
for The Cure, brings his distinctive voice 
to the track and makes it truly a piece 
to be proud of for the band. Additional 
piano and mixing make numerous songs, 
including "All of This," very refreshing 
to listen to, as they stray away from the 



themes of parental oppression/teen angst 
that has driven their songs from the birth 
of their band; and rightly so, as they are 
all in their late 20s and early 30s. 

The lyrics have matured but re- 
main simple and honest, with universal 
themes that most listeners will be able 
to relate to. "Stockholm Syndrome" is 
a song about paranoia and being afraid 
of the world outside a person's comfort 
zone, convinced that people can hear 
your thoughts: "Afraid of the dark (Do 
you hear my whisper?)/An empty heart 
(Replaces with paranoia)/Where do we 
go (Life's temporary)/After we're gone 
(Like New Year's Resolutions)." 

It was a pleasant surprise to hear 
"The Fallen Interlude," as it resembled 
newer AFI songs and other bands that 
have tried different angles for their musi- 
cal endeavors. This song and many oth- 
ers on Blink 182's album includes addi- 
tional instrumentation, such as keyboards 
and violins, two uncommon instruments 
in this genre. 



For the fans that remain impartial to 
Blink 182's previous musical and lyrical 
style, a handful of tracks will suffice. Its 
current single, "Feeling This," for ex- 
ample, dips into an edgier style than what 
we're used to hearing from the band, but 
it remains sweet and light enough, espe- 
cially in its run-of-the-mill chorus. 

For fans who are ready for a change, 
however, this album is what they may 
have been waiting for. The guitars are 
heavier, the drums are more aggres- 
sive, thanks to drummer Travis Barker, 
and vocalists Mark Hoppus and Tom 
DeLonge who collaborate much better 
on this album. They have learned that 
switching off lead vocals every line only 
goes so far. 

Making a great effort to create some- 
thing completely different, but remaining 
recognizable as Blink 182. the band has 
truly made an album that is an eclectic 
group of songs that should make them 
very proud of their surprisingly high- 
quality product. 



6 The Echc 



Opinion 



November 26, 2003 




How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

December 3, 2003 
December 17, 2003 



The F.B.I, should not chill speech 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



"They that can give up essential liberty 
to obtain a lilt/e temporary safety deserve 
neither liberty nor safety. " 

-Benjamin Franklin 

Attorney General John Ashcroft sought 
help from the ghost of J. Edgar Hoover for 
his latest attack on the civil liberties of 
Americans. Hoover, who was a long-time 
civil liberties abuser, routinely spied on 
his enemies, their political movements and 



their respective leaders, including Dr. Mar- 
tin Luther King, Jr. 

Ashcroft proved that he learned well 
from Hoover's example when he authorized 
the FBI to investigate and monitor antiwar 
demonstrations, peace organizations and 
religious groups without evidence of crimi- 
nal activity in the wake of Sept. 1 1 . More 
recently, the FBI released a memorandum 
to local law enforcement agencies across 
the country in an effort to make them aware 
of the methods used by antiwar demonstra- 
tors. The memo refers to pre-demonstra- 
tion rehearsals as "training camps" in what 
can be seen as little less than a full-scale 
antiwar smear campaign by the FBI. It is 
ridiculous to call a nonviolent demonstra- 
tion rehearsal a "training camp." In the 
parlance of our times, "training camp" has 
become strongly associated with facilities 
designed to train bloodthirsty, bottom-feed- 
ing terrorists. 

Worse still is that being watched by the 
FBI will have a chilling effect on the free 
speech of antiwar demonstrators. Poten- 



tially thousands of patriotic Americans op- 
posed to the war in Iraq will be dissuaded 
from peaceful protest because of the FBI's 
ever-watchful eye. Fear of repercussions at 
work or elsewhere will keep these people 
from exercising their constitutionally 
granted right to free speech. This may not 
seem like a big deal to those citizens who 
don't use their civil liberties. But for many 
of us. Ben Franklin included, it seems 
pointless to fight abroad for the freedoms 
our government is taking away at home. 

Although the memo acknowledges that 
most antiwar demonstrations are peace- 
ful, it encourages local law enforcement 
to investigate them anyway. This seems 
contrary to the fundamental belief that 
American citizens are innocent until prov- 
en guilty. More to the point, I find it hard 
to believe that monitoring antiwar groups 
will make this country safer. I believe in a 
nation that allows the FBI director to dress 
as he or she pleases and allows citizens to 
speak and protest peacefully without fear 
of unwarranted suspicion by the FBI. 



Hollywood vs. the U.S. government 



By Brian Roberts 

Columnist 



During current times of war in this 
country, one thing is almost guaranteed: 
Hollywood will spout off its opinion on 
what is right and wrong with the current 
administration. With the war in Iraq coming 
full circle, celebrities came out in full force 
to push their agenda on various news and 
award shows. 

As shocking as it may sound, this 
never happened when Clinton bombed Iraq 
in 1996. or when he attacked the Bosnian 
Serbs in 1995 and 1999, bombed Serbia 
to get Slobodan Milosevic out of Kosovo. 
Not a single peace rally was held when our 
Rangers were ambushed in Somalia and 18 
young American lives were lost. Not a peep 
was heard from Hollywood. It wasn't until a 
God-fearing Republican took office that they 
came out in droves. 

Many, including myself, wonder where 
celebrities get their political information and 
how they seem to know so much more than 
our elected officials. They are not briefed 
every day by the CIA, the FBI, Interpol, 
NATO, the United Nations, our own military, 
or allies around the world. 

When celebrities began bashing the war, 
1 didn't sit around wondering why they felt 
that way. I pondered their educational back- 
ground. What experience do they have in 
state affairs or national security? 

For example, singer Barbra Streisand, 
who promised to leave the country if Bush 
was elected (and yet is still living here), 
only had a high-school education. Actor 
Alec Baldwin, who is known for speaking 



at Democratic rallies defaming Republicans, 
dropped out of George Washington Univer- 
sity after a scandal. Martin Sheen, who plays 
the president on TV, flunked the entrance 
exam to the University of Dayton. 

Now, although a college diploma does 
not mean a person is a genius, most of us 
here at CLU hope that a BA will get us a 
better job. Cher dropped out of school in 
9th grade and Sean Penn, who became an 
unofficial diplomat weeks before the war 
in Iraq, only completed high school. All 
of them challenged our president (who 
received a BA from Yale University and 
an MBA from Harvard Business School), 
Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld 
(who attended Princeton University on a 
scholarship in 1954), and National Security 
Advisor Condoleezza Rice. Rice earned her 
bachelor's degree in political science, cum 
laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from the Univer- 
sity of Denver in 1 974 by the age of 1 9. She 
obtained her master's from the University of 
Notre Dame in 1975, and her Ph.D. from the 
Graduate School of International Studies at 
the University of Denver in 1981. 

So who are these celebrities to tell our 
national officials how to run a country? Per- 
haps no star matches the hallmark hypocrisy 
of the liberal college student's dream and 
idol, documentary director Michael Moore. 
I have a hard time watching a documentary 
or reading a book titled "Stupid White Men" 
by a person who dropped out of his first year 
of college at the University of Michigan. 
Maybe Moore's book title was referring to 
himself. 1 don't know. But it is Moore's alter 
ego that should be closely examined, instead 
of his films. 



"I'm not rich," Moore said. "I mean, on 
the rungs of the ladder in Hollywood — you 
know me, I'm making documentary films 
— I'm on the lowest rung." 

Why did Moore make this comment, 
considering that he later revealed this fol- 
lowing fact at Humboldt State University 
in 2002; "I'm a millionaire. I'm a multimil- 
lionaire. I'm filthy rich. You know why I'm 
a multimillionaire? 'Cause multimillions 
like what 1 do. That's pretty good, isn't it? 
There's millions that believe in what I do," 
That doesn't make much sense, does it? It 
only gels worse. 

Moore, who despises guns, is an avid 
advocate of gun control. "Handguns have to 
go," Moore said. "Easy access to guns by a 
species that often responds irrationally and 
with intense emotions is a lethal combina- 
tion." 

However, as reported in the Detroit Free- 
Press, Moore admitted to being raised in 
rural Lapeer, Mich., and is a card-carrying 
member of the National Rifle Association. 

Furthermore, Moore flaunts himself as 
being the common man who runs his fingers 
through his hair to comb it. Why, then, does 
Moore joke about the wealthy and then fly 
first class at his publisher's expense to his 
posh home in New York City's Central Park 
West, where he sends his teenage daughter to 
an elite private school? 

Before you start following a celebrity's 
political views, or anyone, for that matter, 
get informed. Don't automatically follow 
them because they parade information 
you've never heard before. Otherwise, you 
might find yourself in Moore's next install- 
ment of "Stupid White Men." 



The 



Echo Staff 



Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 
Circulation/Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Karen Peterson 
News Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Arts & Features Editor 

Angela Fentiman 
Sports Editor 



Brandee Tecson 
Opinion Editor 

Kyle Peterson 
Photo Editor 

Nicholas Andersen 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Leah Juergens 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Mailer: Tile slaif of The Echo welcomes 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself. However, the 
slaff acknowktlees Hut opinions presented do not ncccssanl) 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
editorials, letters to the edilor and odter submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly jpiplicd by the adverth 
ing party of otherwise specifically, slated, advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes Such printing is not to be 
construed, as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investiganon of such commercial enterprises or ventures 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805) 493-3865 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity. 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787 
Telephone. (805) 493-3465. Fas: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 
cchodclunet.edu. 



November 26. 2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 7 



Jackson faces new allegations 



By Brandee Tecson 
Opinion Editor 

Singer Michael Jackson was released 
on $3 million bail after he surrendered to 
authorities on Friday, Nov. 21. Jackson was 
arrested on multiple charges of "lewd or las- 
civious conduct-with a child under 14, " with 
each charge carrying a sentence of three to 
eight years in prison. 

According to reports, the young accuser 
said Jackson gave him wine and sleeping 
pills before molesting him at Neverland 
Ranch. Just days earlier, the Santa Barbara 
County Sheriff's Office and district attorney 
spent more than 1 2 hours searching the ranch 
for evidence. 

This is the second time in 10 years 
that the singer has faced such allegations. 
In August 1993, police launched a criminal 
investigation after a 13-year-old boy told his 
therapist that Jackson had sexually molested 
him for four months. 

Early in 1994, Jackson ended the civil 
case through a multimillion-dollar out-of- 
court settlement. This time, however, the 
accuser's family is adamant about taking 
Jackson to court. 

Although he publicly proclaimed his 
innocence, Jackson's image has never fully 
recovered. Over the years, there have been a 
string of incidents that have made the public 
question Jackson's eccentric and often- 
freakish behavior. 

In 2002, he grabbed headline news 
around the world after dangling his baby son 
over the balcony of a Berlin hotel. He said it 
was a mistake. Well, there's an understate- 
ment. 

Earlier this year, he told BBC interview- 
ers he shared his bed with many children, 
though nothing sexual occurred. Scarily. 
Jackson said he saw nothing wrong with 
showing affection toward youngsters that 
way. 



ABC's "Good Morning America 
broadcast exclusive footage last Friday from 
inside Jackson's Neverland Ranch, includ- 
ing his private quarters. The shocking video, 
reportedly shot in 1994, shows a secret room 
behind a trapdoor at Jackson's mansion 
where he apparently entertained kids who 
slept over. The chamber is concealed so well 
that it may have been missed by police. 

The tape revealed a hidden door at 
the back of a walk-in closet in Jackson's 
bedroom suite. The door opens to a narrow 
carpeted stairwell lined with rag dolls that 
descends into a small chamber that looks like 
a twisted version of a child's bedroom. 

A bed is adorned with pillow cases 
imprinted with Peter Pan's face and the 
word "Neverland." Sitting on the bed is a 
red-headed, bug-eyed stuffed doll, and on 
a nightstand next to the bed is a Mickey 
Mouse telephone. On the walls are framed 
pictures of smiling youngsters, which the TV 
show said were not Jackson's children. 

Although the legal system will ultimate- 
ly be the judge of Jackson's guilt or inno- 
cence on these criminal charges, one cannot 
help but wonder one thing in this case: where 
were the parents? 

What kind of parents would allow their 
children to- visit Jackson at his Neverland 
Ranch? Even without criminal charges, why 
didn't the parents pay attention to the earlier 
accusations? 

Why didn't they listen to Jackson's 
comments, watch his odd behavior and con- 
clude it was best to steer their children far, 
far away from him? 

What parents would approve of their 
child going to a sleepover at Neverland? The 
only sane answer is none. 

No parents in their right mind would al- 
low their child to stay overnight at an adult 
male's home unsupervised, especially one 
who has publicly admitted to sleeping in the 
same bed with underage children. 



"I have slept in bed with many children,' 
Jackson told filmmaker Martin Bashir in his 
documentary titled "Living with Michael 
Jackson." "It's very right. It's what the world 
needs — more love, more heart." 

"The most loving thing you can do is to 
share your bed with someone," Jackson said. 
Call me crazy, but under no circumstance is 
it all right for a 45-year-old man to share a 
bed with a 12-year-old boy, unsupervised. 
Not even if he's Michael Jackson. 

If Jackson is, indeed, guilty of these 
allegations, than shame to the parents for 
allowing their children to be out in this 
situation. Shouldn't this be seen as a form of 
negligence? Their first concern should have 
been the well-being of their children, even 
if it meant Jackson never got closer to them 
than a TV screen. 

Another question that arises is whether 
Jackson is a fit parent to his three children 
Prince Michael I, Paris and Prince Michael 
II (also called "Blanket"). 

Los Angeles attorney Gloria Alfred is 
calling on the Santa Barbara Department 
of Social Services to take away Jackson's 
children, at least temporarily, in light of the 
allegations. However, authorities have said 
that child molestation charges would not au- 
tomatically prompt child welfare authorities 
to take action. 

After seeing the now-infamous inter- 
view with Bashir, I am certain that some 
sort of interference needs to take place. I was 
alarmed to see Jackson parading his children 
around with veils and masks over their faces. 
Surely that isn't normal behavior. I'm sure 
these children already assume they are the 
center of the free world, but to make them 
walk around in a Spiderman mask cannot be 
healthy. Not even First Lady Jackie Kennedy 
made little John-John walk around with a 
paper bag over his head. 

It appears to be yet another ploy from 
Jackson to get attention from the public, ex- 



cept this time it is at his children's expense. 
Even in such trying times, Jackson is 
still relishing in the limelight. He stopped 
his convoy in the streets of Las Vegas to get 
support and attention from radical fans that 
swarmed his car. Candlelight vigils have 

"I have slept in bed with 
many children. It's very 
right. It's what the world 
needs — more love, more 
heart." 

Michael Jackson 
Entertainer 

been held across the world in support of 
Jackson. 

However, the silence in Hollywood 
is deafening. Many celebrities and close 
friends of Jackson, like singer Liza Minnelli 
and actor Macaulay Culkin, who adamantly 
supported the singer back in 1-993, have re- 
mained mum on the situation. 

Only actress Elizabeth Taylor, who first 
declined to comment, issued a statement on 
Sunday saying her friend was "absolutely 
innocent" of child molestation charges and 
will be "vindicated." 

Vindicated or not, Jackson's image is 
severely damaged and at this point, likely 
beyond repair. 

With all of his odd behavior taking 
precedence over his music, the King of 
Pop's fan base has substantially dwindled 
over the years. His last record "Invincible" 
sold a mere 2 million. Definitely not up to 
"Thriller" standards. 

After several bizarre incidents and 
repeated allegations, one has to wonder 
where the public should draw the line. 

Sooner or later, Michael, there are no 
more second chances. 



Hilton c ries over sex tape scandal 



By Devon Bostock 
Columnist 

1 spent a few nights last week locked 
in the clutches of insomnia. My natural 
reaction when faced by this dilemma is to 
turn on the TV. Fortunately, being in a semi- 
conscious state meant 1 couldn't comprehend 
half of the horrible programming that is on 
after midnight. 

One show that caught my eye was 
"Celebrity Justice." "Celebrity Justice" is 
a program that devotes an entire half-hour 
to digging into the details of the latest legal 
battles facing our favorite celebrities. Not 
having seen the show before, it sounded 
somewhat interesting in my delirium — so 
I watched it. 

It turns out that not only does this show 



go over what is happening in the legal world 
as it relates to the stars, but the stars in ques- 
tion are given interview time. The result is 
a noise that can only be likened to a group 
of howling coyotes. If you've never heard 
coyotes howl, it sounds like a group of very 
loud babies crying. 

The interviewer sits with a star and 
speaks to him or her in a consoling man- 
ner, while the star is given the chance to 
cry about his or her problems. The episode I 
watched covered the latest scandal regarding 
Paris Hilton and her infamous "videotape." 
If you haven't heard about Ms. Hilton and 
her latest bedroom debacles, just look her 
up on the Internet. It will take no more than 
five seconds (depending on your connection 
speed) to find out. In any case, the coverage 
included an interview with the editor-in- 



chief of Us Magazine, who was "fortunate" 
enough to interview Hilton on a recent flight. 
She talked about how Hilton spent a majority 
of the long plane trip to Los Angeles crying 
about having to exit the plane and deal with 
reporters. She also insisted that her profes- 
sional life was in ruins and her personal life 
was miserable, as well. 

This was all too much for me. Hilton's 
crying epitomized the ability of most celebri- 
ties to make their problems the center of the 
world. Sure, they are in the spotlight. But 
that is why they make the money they do. It 
is a trade-off that each one has to be willing 
to make. Yet, when it comes time to admit to 
making a stupid mistake, very few of them 
are able to laugh it off and move on with life. 
Such is the case with Paris Hilton. It is hard 
for me to understand how an "heiress" to a 



multibillion-dollar hotel franchise can get so 
caught up in herself, though somehow she 
manages to and cries to us about it. 

My advice to Paris and any other stars 
who overinflate their problems is to look at 
the situation reasonably. Conjure up whatev- 
er dramatic ability you have and at least act 
as if you've let it go. Once you do this, the 
media will leave you alone. After all, who is 
more interesting: a very low-key celebrity, or 
Paris Hilton crying in the LAX terminal? 

No matter how bad it seems for Hilton, 
her problems will only be important to the 
tabloids for another week or so. Then, al- 
ways, some other hapless celebrity will steal 
the limelight. 

As for any other stars who happen to 
read this, please don't go on "Celebrity Jus- 
tice" — your howling is keeping me awake. 



Closed-m inded in an open world 



By Jon Acquisti 
Columnist 

It seems that here at California Lutheran 
University, the students are closed minded 
when it comes to appreciating other forms 
of religion. I believe it is possible for a stu- 
dent to be very spiritual, but not religious. 
This was the topic of conversation at the 
Founder's Day Convocation presented ear- 
lier this month. 

Not every student chooses to attend 
CLU for religious reasons. Actually, looking 
around, sometimes it is hard to tell that this 
is a religious school. Students may consider 



themselves religious and spiritual; just re- 
ligious; just spiritual; or neither. And that 
really should not matter to anyone but that 
student. I consider myself to be barely reli- 
gious, but extremely spiritual. Saying that, I 
am aware of the backlash that may come as a 
result — but I don't really care, because this 
is my life. 

That is the beauty of this world. We 
are given the freedom to practice what we 
desire. Personally. I find that meditation in 
nature is what reaps the greatest personal 
rewards. Naturalists are able to become one 
with nature and receive the Earth's energy 
and love. 



Religion, especially Christianity, does 
not seem to leave anything open for inter- 
pretation. Having been raised Lutheran and 
having attended Sunday school from a young 
child to my Confirmation, I do have a strong 
sense of relationship with ihe presence of 
God. It is through this knowledge that I am 
able to compare many different religions 
against Christianity. 

It seems that people who are highly re- 
ligious ara not very tolerant of people who 
practice other's faiths. However, it is just 
the opposite with those who follow spiritual 
practices. They tend to be more accepting of 
other's faith. 



Everyone is searching for something 
greater. It does not matter what faith you 
are or what'you believe. We are all going to 
believe in different things. It is how you treat 
people with different beliefs that defines who 
you are as a person. To be able to accept dif- 
ferent traditions, religions, or practices will 
guide you through life happier and with a 
better sense of human compassion. 

Life is not about judging others. It is 
not even about judging yourself. It is about 
living in the present and making choices that 
you feel are right. 

With an open mind and acceptance for 
all, life can never be truly bad. 



8 The Echo 



Sports 



Fox has record-breaking career 



November 26, 2003 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



Senior Jimmy Fox capped off an out- 
standing career at wide receiver last week 
by breaking Mike Hagen's record for most 
receptions ever at California Lutheran 
University. 

The record had stood for nearly 30 
years. Fox grabbed 176 passes in his four 
years as a Kingsman. 

"I really never imagined that 1 would 
hold a record like this here." Fox said. "I 
was originally looking to go to Arizona 
State for their well-renowned communica- 
tion program, but then I decided to come 
here since I have family in Agoura and I 
lived there until I was 13. In high school. 
I played running back, so when I got here 
and made the move to receiver, it just be- 
came a learning process. Your freshmen 
year, you just have to be patient because 
there is so much coming at you." 

Fox is no stranger to breaking records; 
he holds the record at Monte Vista High 
School for most yards rushing in a season, 
with 1,505. 

"I really just tried to get better every 
day. 1 started to see some action in the 
games, and realized that 1 had a lot of little 
things to work on. So I tried to practice 
them to get better, through catching drills, 
working on running tight routes, blocking, 
and the biggest thing was picking up yards 



1 #* DUE? 7TH5H1 l 








W& 




J *r 


*• 


v V 




P /— M0& 




% 





Photograph by Dan Norton 
Fox rushes after a reception during his record-breaking performance in the 70-13 
Kingsmen victory over Whiuier on Nov. 15. 



after the catch," Fox said. 

Fox came into the season needing 57 
catches to tie the record. 

"1 didn't really think about the record 
until midway through the season, and it 
started to seem more and more possible. I 
needed to average seven catches a game, 
and as it got closer I knew I really had a 
shot to do it," Fox said. "After my junior 
year. I only caught 40 balls and I didn't feel 
I was really the go-to guy. We had some 



other good receivers and some talented 
guys who got injured. I worked hard and 
was lucky enough to stay healthy and good 
things just happened." 

Fox does not have any plans to con- 
tinue his playing career. 

"Right now I'm just real excited to try 
and get a sports broadcasting position any- 
where I can. I have done some intern work 
for Fox Sports and hopefully that will help 
me break onto the scene." Fox said. 



CLU's Hirsh has 4th-best fastball 



By Lindsey Rarick 
Staff Writer 



Jason Hirsh, a former California 
Lutheran University pitcher, was ranked 
fourth-best for his fastball among 2003 
Major League Baseball draft picks, ac- 
cording to Baseball America. 

"It's because I throw hard and they are 
projecting me to be a closer, even though I 
would like to be a starter," Hirsh said. 

Hirsh. a 6-foot-8. 250-pound pitcher, 
was drafted to the Houston Astros in 
the second round, 59th pick overall. As 
Houston's first pick, he was the highest 
ever to come out of Cal Lutheran. Among 
Houston's draftees, he was also labeled as 
"closest to the majors." 

"Jason threw harder than anyone 
on our team last year. I'm glad he chose 
baseball instead of wrestling," former Cal 
Lutheran teammate Ed Edsall said. 

In 2003, Hirsh finished his CLU career 
with a 9-1 record and a 3.68 ERA while 
throwing in the mid-90s consistently. He 
reached the second-best total in CLU his- 
tory with 126 strikeouts in 100.1 innings. 

"Hirsh was a natural leader and 
brought inspiration to the field each day. 
You can leam a lot from watching him," 

Regals basketball receives 




"Last year, things kind of explod- 
ed. I had no idea I was going to 
throw 97 mph. It was ridiculous." 

Jason Hirsh 
2nd round draft pick 

Photograph by Becca Hunau HOUStOn Ast/OS 



By Justin Shore 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's basketball team suffered a 111- 
49 defeat in their opening game to Master's 
College on Nov. 22. 

The Regals knew that they would have 
good competition in their first game. The 
Master's College ranked 5th nationally in 
preseason polls for NAIA Women's Bas- 
ketball. 

"We went into the game knowing that 
it was going to be a tough battle. We have 
a challenging preseason schedule and these 



former CLU teammate Zach Spencer said. 

"Last year, things kind of exploded. 1 
had no idea I was going to throw 97 mph. 
It was ridiculous." Hirsh said. 

After Hirsh was drafted, he played 
in the New York/ Pennsylvania single A 
League from July 8 to Sept. 3, 2003. with 
a number of top talents. During his short 
summer season, Hirsh threw five innings 
per game, threw for 32 and one-third in- 
nings maintaining a 1.95 ERA. He had 
33 strikeouts and seven walks. Overall, 
he finished his New York/Pennsylvania 
League throwing 21 scoreless innings. 

"1 started my summer season in the 
bullpen and worked my way up to starting. 
My one downfall is my off-speed pitches, 
like sliders and change-ups. I want to be 

beating in season-opener 

results are no indication of what we will do 
in SCIAC." sophomore Alex Mallen said. 

Julie Cichon scored a team-high 12 
points in the contest. 

"This game was a good learning expe- 
rience for us to play against a team of that 
magnitude. We can only get stronger and 
build from our first loss." Cichon said. 

Despite the loss. Head Coach Kristy 
Hopkins remains optimistic and has high 
expectations for her team in the 2003-2004 
season. 

"We know that we have an extremely 
difficult preseason schedule, playing NAIA 
schools that give scholarships. Our objec- 
tive is to win SCIAC," Hopkins said. 



able to throw my off-speed for strikes. I 
will be working on that in the off-season 
so I can go into spring training looking 
sharp," Hirsh said. 

After earning a signing bonus of 
$625,000, Hirsh has purchased a new 
truck and a condo in Las Vegas. Despite 
his large signing bonus and his baseball 
career ahead of him, Hirsh wanted to finish 
his degree in multimedia at CLU. When he 
returned to CLU this fall, he did not want 
a lot of hype around his getting drafted; 
however, he was asked frequently why he 
decided to come back to CLU. 

"1 would rather go to school and hang 
out with my friends than go find a job 
somewhere. In a year or two, things will 
probably change a tot more," Hirsh said. 



Water polo 
focuses on 
the future 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 

Not often is a team satisfied with its 
season when its only victory was against 
another school's club team, but this year's 
water polo team at California Lutheran 
University is an unusual case. 

In its inaugural season this year, the 
team was hoping to get experience instead 
of worrying about scores. It finished the 
season with a record of 0-18. 

One of the main concerns for the play- 
ers at the start of the season was trying to 
get in shape. 

"It's been a big problem," said senior 
Jamie Aronson. "We only have seven play- 
ers, so it's tough because we have to play 
all 28 minutes and I haven't played in five 
years." 

Senior Heath Williams said that get- 
ting used to playing at the collegiate level 
was a major adjustment as well. 

"It's different at the college level than 
in high school because there's more skill 
involved. In high school you can just swim 
around a lot and you'll win," Williams 
said. 

Keeping these difficulties in mind, the 
team used this season to improve. 

"We all learned a lot and we improved 
a lot as a team throughout the year," Wil- 
liams said. "From our first tournament to 
our last, people were able to leam their 
positions." 

With Williams being the only member 
of the team that won't be back next year, 
the team hopes to continue improving on 
what it has learned this season. 

"This year was tough in practice 
because, with only seven players, we 
couldn't really go offense versus defense. 
We could only work on one at a time. 
We're hoping to have about 1 3 people for 
next year which would give us two full 
lines," Aronson said. 

Next year's team will be a young 
one. The coaches have been hitting the 
recruiting trail hard recently and have 
had about 15 recruits come visit the 
school. The increase in numbers should 
also help the team become more focused 
and disciplined as well. 

"This year, our coach couldn't really 
do much because if someone doesn't show 
up for practice they're still going to be able 
to play in the games. Next year, all of us 
will come in with more experience and all 
the recruits will be coming straight out of 
high school and they'll be ready to go," 
Aronson said. 



CLU Ballin' 



Student vs. Faculty Basketball Game 
Dec. 3 
8 p.m. 

CLU Gym 

tickets: $2 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 44. No. 12 



60 Wlst Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks, CA91360 



Sports 

Regals basketball learn gels firsl 
win of season. 

See story page 11 



Art 

Chinese Brush Pointing opens in the 
Kwan FongArl Gallery. 



See story page 7 



December 10, 2003 
News 



Pulitzer Prize winner Howard 
Rosenberg visits CLU. 



See story page 3 



Christmas comes early 




By Heather Peterson 
Staff Writer 

The annual Christmas Camaraderie 
took place at President Luther Luedtke's 
house on Wednesday, Dec. 3. This event 
is held for all California Lutheran Univer- 
sity employees and symbolizes the start of 
the holiday, season. 

"It's kind of a kick-off to the holiday 
season," said Angela Naginey, director of 
Residence Life. 

For the past three years. Luedtke and 
his wife Carol have hosted this event in 
their home. Previously, it was held in 
Overton Hall and the Nelson room. 

"It's neat for them to open their home 
to us this way," Naginey said. 

Carol Luedtke looks forward to host- 
ing this event every year. 

"The Christmas Camaraderie, the 
Ereshman/Parent welcome, and the Senior 
Send-off are my three favorite events that 
we host here." Carol Luedtke said, "Even 
if I've had a long day, as soon as the first 
person comes to the door, I get excited 
...We always have the house full of the 



Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
President Luther Luedtke in his cap and his wife Carol Luedtke in her kerchief wish 
everyone happy holidays. 

CLU diversity lauded 



By Erick Elhard 
Staff Writer 



For nearly a decade, California Lu- 
theran University has been receiving dis- 
tinction for being one of the top schools 
in America for Hispanics. This year is 
no exception. For the eighth consecutive 
academic year, the Hispanic Outlook in 
Higher Education has identified CLU as a 
great learning and cultural environment for 
Hispanic collegians. Over 2,500 schools 
are in the running each year to receive this 
tribute for offering 'solid opportunities for 
Hispanic students," according to CLU's 
website. 

Before awarding this honor, mem- 
bers of the H.O.H.E. visit each candidate 
university to evaluate its performance on 
a number of criteria, including numbers 
of minorities, cultural programs and sup- 
port for students. When they visited CLU 
several years ago, the Office of Multicul- 
tural and International Programs was in- 
terviewed extensively. Juanita Pryor Hall, 
director of the office, is confident that CLU 
deserves this prestige. 

"We do go out of our way to help stu- 
dents. We have a very active faculty to help 
our Latino community," Pryor Hall said. 

One of the on-campus programs that 
has helped increase intercultural experi- 
ence, knowledge and acceptance is the 
Latin American Student Organization. Its 
mission is to promote unity and support 
for Latino students at CLU and to share the 
Latin culture with the entire student body. 



LASO helps plan and facilitate events like 
the observation of the traditional Latino 
holiday, Dia de los Muertos. It also offers 
recreational opportunities like free salsa 
dancing lessons. Maria Meza, senior and 
LASO club president, and Venus Tamayo, 
sophomore and LASO vice president, of- 
fered some insight into why CLU is attrac- 
tive for Hispanic students. 

"It's appealing because everyone is 
very nice to minorities and we're not per- 
ceived as different, even though we're in 
the minority." Meza said. 

"I really like the small school and small 
campus," Tamayo said. "It was a culture 
shock at first, coming from Oxnard, which 
is more culturally diverse. It was hard, but 
everyone has been very welcoming." 

Lupita Montejano and Felicia Martin, 
assistant directors of admission and coor- 
dinators of multicultural admission, see 
H.O.H.E. 's recognition as another block in 
the foundation of multiculturalism at CLU. 
That CLU's student body is currently 15 
percent Hispanic and that CLU is the only 
private university in Ventura County are 
important attractors for prospective Latino 
students. 

"Hispanic students thrive in small en- 
vironments, especially for first-generation 
students, where the college experience is 
new for them and their families," Monte- 
jano said. 

Martin and Montejano cite the one-on- 
one attention from professors, the various 
outlets to receive extra help on written 
assignments and the growing number of 
Latino professors at CLU as comforting 



factors for a Hispanic student who might 
be worried about performing at the college 
level. 

"The students that graduate from here 
then go back to their communities as role 
models, raising interest in CLU," Monte- 
jano said. 

One current student has already been 
singled out as a role model. People maga- 
zine, in its April 21, 2003, issue, profiled 
Angela Garcia, a CLU freshman with both 
African- American and Hispanic heritage 
who overcame family and personal strife 
on her road to college. Garcia is confident 
that CLU was the correct choice for her 
future. 

"I am very pleased here and I've never 
seen a diversity problem," Garcia said. "I 
notice that we all get along and I've never 
seen a racial incident." 

Pryor Hall sees the recognition from 
H.O.H.E. as advantageous not only for the 
present and future Hispanic students, but 
also for all of CLU. 

"It continues to promote diversity, 
which has been shown to help with aca- 
demic challenges and scholarship," she 
said. However, she does see some areas 
where uniformity at CLU is a problem. 

"We need more diversity within the 
faculty, administration staff, and students 
and diverse cross-cultural interaction in a 
meaningful way," Pryor Hal! said. 

Meza is optimistic about CLU becom- 
ing more of a melting pot in future years. 

"We are going to be more diverse 
someday soon. We can all be open- 
minded." 



"It's (Christmas Camra- 
derie) kind of a kick-off to 
the holiday season ." 



Angela Naginey 
Director of Residence Life 

most interesting people and invigorating 
conversations." 

Carol Luedtke was especially excited 
about surprising the guests this year with 
a special performance of the Christmas 
story, "'Twas the Night Before Christ- 
mas." 

Religion professor Joseph Everson 
read the story as members of the CLU 
staff acted it out. President and Mrs. 
Luedtke played Poppa and Momma, and 
Lawrence Rodriguez, assistant director of 
admissions, played St. Nicholas. 

At the end of the performance. Presi- 
dent Luedtke wished everyone "a jolly 
and merry and blessed time to all of us." 

More intruders 
on CLU campus 

By Karen Peterson 
News EDrrOR 

On Sunday, Dec. 7. a white Dodge 
vehicle with a male occupant described by 
residents as "creepy" was sitting outside 
3222 Luther St., a university-owned house. 
When one of the residents arrived home the 
vehicle pulled slowly toward her. Residents 
wary of several previous incidents with in- 
truders called the police. 

Tjje week before on Monday, Dec. 1, a 
resident of the same house was doing dishes 
when she noticed a man standing outside 
her kitchen window in the. side yard. She 
pointed out that this meant the man had to 
open the gate and go through their backyard 
to get to the kitchen window. The Thousand 
Oaks Police Department was called and 
searched unsuccessfully alongside Campus 
Security for the man. According to the 
security alert, he was described as a 5'8"- 
5' 1 1 "white male in his late 30s to early 40s 
with blond hair, a thin face and no facial 
hair. Authorities do not believe he is the 
same man as the September intruder. 

It seems a rash of theft has occurred on 
campus. On Thursday, Dec. 4. according to 
a security uiert, an intruder entered an un- 
locked room in Thompson Hall and stole a 
laptop computer and a backpack. The week 
before on Monday, Nov. 27, Mount Clef and 
Pederson Hall were broken into sometime 
in between*9 p. m.-ll p. m. The intruders 
were let into the buildings by students and 
went into unlocked rooms and reportedly 
stole laptop computers, a cell phone, a cam 
corder and a passport. 

For more information contact Kluy Pi 
terson in the Security office at ext. 3960. 



2 Thk Eci 



Calendar 



DECEMBER 10.2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

december 10 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10a.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday 

december II 



College Democrats Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
7 p.m. 



The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 





ng 

4> 




friday 

december 12 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Club Lu: Hall Caroling 

Forum 
9 p.m. 



Saturday 

december 13 



Regals Basketball vs. Concordia Univ. 

Chapel 
12 p.m. 



Sunday 

december 14 

Advent Vespers Worship 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 

monday 

december 15 

Finals Week 




ASCLV-C RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 

tuesday 

'.'•- \AII december 16 



i 



Finals Week 

College Democrats - Voter Registration 

SUB 
All Day 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen I 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen I 
6:30 p.m. 



Tired Treats 

Chapel Nartho 
10 p.m. 



VOTE 

«T|TTJ 



«tH 

• ■■* 

to 



TAilors Needed: $!5-$18/hr. Bright, enthusiastic people 

to leach one-on-one. in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal & 

Academic subjects in your area of expertise. We 11 train. 

Flexible scheduling. Trans, req. We tutor students throughout 

L.A. & the Valley. Mail, fax. or email cover letter and resume\ 

Include standardized test scores (SAT 1/11, GRE. etc.) 

It interested, muil information to: 

ACE Educational Services; 

ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K 

Los Angeles, CA 900.15 

or fax resume to: 

(310) 282-6424 

or email resume to: 

Lnstructorhiruig6@aceeducatlou.com 



Classified ads can 

be placed on the 

Calendar page for a 

flat rate regardless 

of word count. 

Discount available 

for multiple-issue 

orders. Ads are 

subject to editing for 

content & clarity. 

Call: 
(805) 493-3865 



Students Omsbudspersons 



Cl.tl's fatuity omsbudspersi 

help students rusnlvi: prtibli: 

With facility in a cor 



; that they may be-havi 



Your , in e:i m |.i»s omsbudspersons arc: 

Dr. Eva Ramirez, Spanish Dr. Charles Hall, Sociology 

Office: Humanities 232 Office: G-15 

Phone: (SOS) 493-3349 Phone: (80S) 493-3437 

Dr. Druatiu Pagliasolti, Communication 

Office: SBET 119 

Phone: (805) 493-3374 



Don't let tonllicl ruin tour learning espei 



nlact one of these three prole 



s lodaj ! 



Rain, Rain Go Away 
so Cafe a la Cart can Stay! 




SrWMLJ 

On rainy days, Cafe a la Cart will be 
closed as an electrical precaution. 



CONGRATULATIONS ... 

to the recepients of the Omicron 

Delta Kappa November 
Leadership Excellence Award: 



Karly Wilson 

Kevin Kern 
Heath Williams 



ATTENTION!!! 

For all non-returning students : 

IFyoUrk6C£IVeDXPerxKINJLOXN,XNDXWNOIWTUrkNINC 
TO CLV FOI^ JPMNC SEMeSTEPs, PL€ME CONTACT MXPJX 
MONUS XT (805) 4*3-3518 IN THE STUDENT ACCOUNTS 
OFFICE. IT IS MXNDXTOKy THXT YOU XTTEND LOXN 6XIT 
COUNStLINC PPxlOrk TO yoUPs DEPXRjUrU FMM CLW. 



Remember that time you boogie-boarded down 

the muddy slopes of Kingsmen Park during the 

rain & ate tree to save yourself from the raging 

creek? 

Want to share great experiences like that with 
future students? 

Take Cal Lutheran 

Home for the Holidays! 

To sign up, or to get more Information, please call Liz or Beckle at x3880. 

Dudp that wai Drettv funnv 



TIPS FOR PREPARING FOR AND ENDURING FINALS WEEK: 



-Get lots of rest - Eat well 

- Study in increments, do NOT cram 
- Eliminate distractions - Study in a well-lit, quiet atmosphere 

GOOD LUCK AND HAVE AN AWESOME WINTER BREAK!.'! 




Come join us to ceCe6rate "Hanuffiafil 

"The 'Festival of Lights" 

On Wednesday, (Dec. 1(J' 1 at 4:00p.m. in theSV® 

Everyone is weCcomel! 

Tot more information, please contact Summer at 493-3323 

Sponsored by JTdTet and 9du(t\c\i(t uraf<Progranis 



UNITED STUDENTS OF THE WORLD 

Meetings are heU every 1" and 3** 'Wednesday of 
the month at &PM in the JtAB/ 

Come join usforaiDISCOTE'RYOr C0LTV<R£S around tfie world, 
fun outings and events'. 

<E<v*E<RroNE IS WECCO!M<EI 

Arty questions, calL 
ttodic "Kfavaram 

3 10-963- }72& 
(V.SW 'President) 



BQ5-49J-&23 



December 10, 2003 



News 



■| ^ "■ # 'a ' A " ' 1 "I El Nil 3 

Pulitzer winner visits 

r».. /- i TTi 77- ' ihpir aiiHi^nri^c tn i^ani tl,., . 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writfr 

Former Pulitzer Prize-winning L.A. 
Times columnist Howard Rosenberg 
talked about the biases of news caused by 
media concentration during a Dec. 4 talk 
on campus. 

"The news should be about the pur- 
suit of truth. One must think and analyze 
what one hears and reads on the news," 
Rosenberg said. However, trends in the 
industry mean that the news is no longer 
so objective, he said. 

According to Rosenberg, media 
concentration occurs when large media 
companies buy smaller media companies, 
resulting in fewer independent operators. 
The two dangers of media concentration 
are less diversity of opinion and conflict 
of interest. Conflict of interest may occur 
when reporters unknowingly or know- 
ingly write about entities owned by their 
news medium's parent company. The 
parent companies may also impose their 
views and biases on the smaller news enti- 
ties they own. 

Rosenberg said that another example 
of media bias occurs as cross-promotion, 
which is when media manufacture news 
for self-serving reasons. For example, 
cross-promotion occurs when a network 
promotes a TV show owned by the same 
company or when Los Angeles Times 
stories are mentioned on KTLA, Channel 
5 news. 

Live news has its own dangers. News, 
according to Rosenberg, is anything that 
is fresh and needs to be verified. However, 
one never knows what will happen on live 
television and cannot retract what should 
not have been aired. 

Newscasters, according to Rosenberg, 
often enter the field to become celebrities 
rather than journalists and are paid to 
serve as ornaments. The stations want 



their audiences to accept the newscast 
ers as an extended family, in which the 
weather reporter acts like an uncle and the 
anchor acts like a father. 

Rosenberg also said that television 
news stereotypes people of color by 
always showing them as the ones being 
arrested. 

"1 thought he was a really good 
speaker," junior Julie Martinez said. "He 
had a critical view and good insight about 
the media. When I watch the news. I'm a 
little bit more critical of it." 

"I thought it was really interesting, 
since he talked about a lot of the things 
that I never thought about; for example 
how the media are sexist and biased to- 
ward women and minorities," sophomore 
Valerie Vallejos said. 

"I pay more attention to those little 
details he said and it's interesting to see 
how it is true," Vallejos said. 

Martinez said she had already learned 
about media concentration and bias in oth- 
er communication classes and perceives 
more cross-promotion and stereotypes in 
the media, after hearing Rosenberg. 

Vallejos said that before hearing 
Rosenberg, she noticed how the media 
can discriminate against minorities, but 
not how the media can be sexist. She also 
said that she noticed a bias in newspapers 
but not in television. 

Rosenberg said that he has always 
feared media concentration. 

"For the last decade, it's a trend that's 
been increasing and it's just something 
I've been fearful about," Rosenberg said. 
"As I've done my job, I've observed this 
happening and I can just see the dangers. 
Bigger swallows smaller. 

"It's almost like being in the wild; 
pretty soon all the little guys are gone and 
you only have big guys. I think it's just 
a dangerous concept, whether it's media, 
Wal-Mart or anywhere in this country." 
Rosenberg said that it is difficult to 



"Bias is built into all of us, 
we're the sums of many 
things: of religion, of par- 
ents, of family of friends 
and peers, of media." 

Howard Rosenberg 
former L.A. Times columnist 

distinguish what media stereotypes and 
biases. One can only train oneself to criti- 
cally observe and analyze the media and 
ask why. 

"I don't mean be critical of them," 
Rosenberg said, "but think critically. A lot 
of it is just logic. When I wrote my col- 
umn. 1 wouldn't just say 'yeah,' but 'why,' 
'but what does that mean?' or 'why did 
he say that?' 'why did they use the word 
"terrorist" instead of "insurgent?"' Words 
... have tremendous significance. 

"All you can do [to answer the 'why' 
questions] is just draw your own conclu- 
sions and look for patterns." he said. "For 
example, I've been watching the Fox 
News Channel enough to enough to know 
that you get one side of every issue and it's 
usually the conservative Republican side. 
Now, I'm a liberal Democrat and perhaps 
I'm watching that through skewed eyes; 
maybe I'm so subjective that I'm not see- 
ing it correctly. I don't think it's true, but 
when I always see one side of an issue 
presented, it just becomes obvious to me, 
because I've been watching television and 
doing this for a very long time and think- 
ing critically. But it's something anybody 
can do, if you just rein yourself to think 
critically and think of the media not just 
as your big cuddle friend, but something 
that could have a big influence on you, 
then I think you can do it." 

Rosenberg said that most newscasts 
involve ineptitude, 

"Most of it is just ineptitude. First 



of all, a network newscast, minus com- 
mercials, is 22 minutes. What can you tell 
people about the world, I don't care how 
smart you are, in 22 minutes? Not much. 
What happens is you have news stories 
[that] run from 30-45 seconds. Ninety 
seconds is like a documentary. 

"What can you say about anything 
in 30-45 seconds? All you can do is say 
something that's catchy to me and con- 
veys the wrong impression. That bothers 
me, at least as much a some kind of bias. 
Bias is built into all of us; we're the sums 
of many things: of religion, of parents, of 
family, of friends and peers, of media. 
Lots of things influence us, so we're all 
subjective creatures. I'm pretty bothered 
by the general ineptitude of reporting." 

Rosenberg said that finding better 
news sources begins with finding a good 
newspaper. 

" I know I'm suspect, because of my 
background in newspapers," Rosenberg 
said. "But I think it's important, whether 
it's the Ventura County Star or The L.A. 
Times which, believe me, has its flaws 
but I still think it's a good newspaper. It 
would be nice if we'd use television, if 
you use it at all, as a supplement. There's 
a newscast on Public Television called 
"NewsHour with Jim Lehrer," which is 
better but it gets a little slow at times. 
There are some stories you can't get from 
a newspaper, you can only get from tele- 
vision, I understand that, but reading is 
very important." 

Rosenberg said that media concentra- 
tion is not limited to the United States and 
is increasing around the world. 

"News Corp is worldwide," Rosen- 
berg said. "These companies, for exam- 
ple, have global exposure. CNN is every- 
where; Time magazine, which is owned 
by Time Warner, which is owned by CNN, 
is everywhere. HBO, which is owned by 
the same company, has international ex- 
posure and distribution everywhere.' 



"Most of it is just ineptitude. First P osure and distribution everywhere." 

Students skate around Easy Street 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff Writer 

Easy Street Ice Arena in Simi Valley 
was host to last Friday's California Lutheran 
University's Club Lu event, sponsored by 
ASCLU. Over 120 students filled the arena, 
which was equipped with two ice skating 
rinks. Students had the option of either 
choosing figure or hockey skates, depending 
on their personal preference. 

For some students, ice skating really 
isn't their most admirable talent. 

"My roommate dragged me here to- 
night because I really haven't ice skated a 
whole lot," junior and biology major Jamie 
Meyer said. "I think I have been a total of 
five times." 

Meyer also said that even though she has 
only been a handful of times, she had only 
fallen once so far that night. She said falling 
once was enough and she hoped that it would 
be the last of the evening. 

Lindsey Moore, sophomore and sociol- 
ogy major, said that this Club Lu event is 
her favorite because it tends to draw a large 
amount of students. 

"A lot of people come to this event," 
Moore said. "I think that since its right be- 
fore finals, students want to come and relax 
before it comes time to take the big tests," 
Moore said. 



"Students want to come 
and relax before it comes 
time to take the big 
tests." 



Lindsey Moore 
Sophomore sociology major 

Sophomore Mike McCarthy was not at 
all intimidated by the skates that he had, nor 
was he shaken by the coldness of the arena as 
he was "comfortably" dressed in his shorts 
and T-shirt. 

He said that he likes ice skating, but his 
sole purpose of being there was to appease 
his girlfriend. 

"She pulled me out her tonight so that 
we could go ice skating with our friends," 
McCarthy said. 

"I really am not that cold out here in 
the arena," McCarthy said. "My hands are a 
little cold and my feet hurt because my skates 
aren't exactly fined properly. But everything 
is fine. I am really enjoying myself, aside 
from the fact that I have only been a few 
times before tonight's outing." 

Next week is Club Lu's last event for 
the fall semester. The event is hall caroling. 
Students wanting to participate can meet in 
the Samuelson Chapel at 9 p.m. 




Juniors Laura O 'Neill and Emily Moore 
skate around the rink. 



Students play around on the ice 



4 The Echo 



News 



December 10.2003 



ASCLU meetings 



Last-minute bills passed 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 

Even though the end of the semes- 
ter is looming near. California Lutheran 
University's Residence Hall Association 
is busier than ever. Many bills have been 
passed in the last two weeks, using up 
most of the RHA capital expenditures 
fund. 

Before any of the hall improvement 
bills were passed, the RHA approved 
a transfer of $1,500 from the contin- 
gency fund to the capital expenditures 
fund. Pederson passed a bill for a new 
55" HDTV widescreen television for its 
lounge; New West passed a bill for $570 
to spend on improvements such as moti- 
vational posters for its study rooms, reno- 
vation of its air hockey table and new pool 
table equipment; and MKH passed a bill 
for $150 for a new grill for its buildings. 

MKH had another bill it wanted to 



pass, but the capital expenditures fund ran 
out of money again and the bill was tabled 
to the next meeting, at which another bill 
was drafted to transfer more money into 
the fund. That bill was passed and MKH 
was able to pass its bill for $ 1 , 1 00 to reno- 
vate the patio in Kramer Court as well. 

Mark Neilsen, Old West senior Resi- 
dent Assistant, came to speak about the 
Spring RA selection process. 

"The process will begin next semester 
and interest sessions begin Feb. 1-4, with 
applications being due Feb. 12," Neilsen 
said. 

Information cards are at the front desk 
in the SUB. Questions can be answered 
by Angela Naginey or by Christine Paul 
in the Residence Life office. 

RHA is gearing up to make this year's 
Hal! Caroling the best ever. This year 
each- hall will incorporate an MTV show, 
a song, a celebrity, a traditional Christmas 
carol and a revised Christmas carol. 

"These were all picked at Monday's 



meeting out of a hat, as was the order 
in which the halls will go," said Beckie 
Lewis, RHA programmer. "Each hall is 
judged on incorporating their items, their 
creativity, and not using brown bag mate- 
rial." 

Each hall must also include at least 
1 5 people, extra points awarded for com- 
muters, faculty, staff, administrators and 
alumni. The halls also get points based on 
the amount of money they raise for North 
Campus, as each hall is contributing to the 
fundraising effort. The winning hall will 
get the coveted spirit stick. Judges have 
not been announced yet, but the emcees 
for the event will be junior Jared I. Perry 
and senior Kelly Murkey. 

The hall requirements are as follows; 
Thompson uses Sorority Life, "I Swear," 
and Arnold Schwarzennegger; New West 
uses The Real World, "Kissed by a Rose," 
and Julia Roberts; Pederson uses Say 
What Karaoke, "Take My Breath Away," 
and Justin Timberlake; Mogen, Kramer, 



Houses use Punk'd. "I Will Survive," 
and J. Lo; Mount Clef uses Road Rules, 
"My Heart Will Go On," and Will Ferrell; 
and Old West will use Newlyweds. "Total 
Eclipse of the Heart," and Halle Berry. 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart, National 
Residence Hall honorary chancellor, is 
in charge of the "Of the Month" program 
at CLU. Last month's winners were Katy 
Wilson, a sophomore in Pederson Hall, 
for resident assistant of the month; Holly 
Hoppman for student of the month; Su- 
zie Roslund for national communication 
coordinator of the month; the New West 
Hall Council, consisting of Jen Ledesma, 
Meredith Ebert, and Meggie Graves, for 
spotlight of the month; and Dominic 
Storelli and the "You a Stud" program for 
program of the month. 

"Students are encouraged to keep 
submitting OTM forms for next month's 
winners. The forms can be picked up and 
returned at the SUB information desk," 
Pensack-Rinehart said. 



Senate approves 



Press Release 



S 2i f C t V 111 C Si S U r C S California Lutheran University Partners 

with UCLA, USC In Los Angeles Tissue 



By Brian Roberts 
Staff Writer 



For Senate's last two meetings, the 
senators have been hard at work and play. 
Senate spent its Monday night before 
Thanksgiving break at Chuck E. Cheese 
for their annual get-together off campus. 

"Every semester, as a community 
builder. Senate goes out and involves 
themselves in a social activity," Senate 
Director Jason Soyster said. "It was up 
to the senators and they choose Chuck E. 
Cheese." 

Each senator received pizza, drinks 
and 20 tokens each during the night. Even 
though the night was filled with video 
games and a jungle gym, work was still on* 
the minds of those involved. 

"Rob Boland and 1 discussed benches 
at the cross for this next semester," Soyster 
said. "After approval from the school, they 
should be up by next year." 

The night turned out to be a success, 
providing a way for the members to relieve 
some stress from hard work on Senate and 



never-ending school work. 

"About every semester, some senators 
object to the idea of community building," 
Soyster said. "But it's a way for us to give 
back to them for the hard work they've put 
in." 

But as school began after the holiday 
break, Senate came back and wasted no. 
time passing two bills. The first legislation 
covered involved safety and security on the 
east side of campus (Peterson and Thomp- 
son). The resolution asked for much-need- 
ed improvements in the lighting located in 
the parking lot closest to Faculty St. and 
the resurfacing of floors in the two dorm 
halls. The measure also called for a rising 
of the railings in Peterson and Thompson, 
as they are not up to code with certain stan- 
dards in place. The measure passed 15-0. 

Another bill that was passed involved 
money for the Writing Center. The legisla- 
tion calls for $500 awarded to the center 
for books, texts and manuals. The measure 
passed 14-1. 

"We've had a great first semester," 
Soyster said. "But we hope to have an even 
better second semester." 



Engineering Initiative (LATEI) 

ous support from Baxter BioScience. 




HD145 



Tissue engineering is an emerging 
field that provides a glimpse into the fu- 
ture of medicine - one in which doctors 
may one day be able to routinely repair 
or replace failing or aging body parts. In 
an effort to foster interactions among area 
researchers dedicated to this pursuit, Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University is partnering 
with experts at UCLA, USC and science 
industry leaders create a new collaborative 
opportunity named the Los Angeles Tissue 
Engineering Initiative (LATEI). LATEI 
is open to all interested individuals, with 
an emphasis of providing graduate and 
undergraduate students the opportunity to 
participate in technical discussions with 
academic and industrial scientists and in- 
vestigators. 

The first meeting of LATEI was held 
at CLU on Nov. 8. More than 100 people 
attended the daylong event, with partici- 
pants from as far away as San Diego. The 
meeting consisted of three technical ses- 
sions: bone and hard tissue engineering; 
mechanobiology; and skin and soft tissue 
engineering. In addition, there were infor- 
mal discussions and interactions. All costs 
were covered by CLU's recently launched 
program in bioengineering and by gener- 



"The exciting new field is founded on 
years of research into processes by which 
cells grow," explained Dr. Mike Shaw, 
director of CLU's Center for Integrated 
Science and Bioengineering and one of the 
founders of LATEI. "Using these technolo- 
gies, it will one day be possible to regener- 
ate or replace damaged tissues with labora- 
tory-grown parts such as bone, cartilage, 
blood vessels and skin." 

In addition to Shaw, other founders 
of LATEI include Prof. Warren Garner 
of University of Southern California 
(USC), Dr. Bill Tawil of Baxter BioSci- 
ence, Prof. Tai-Lan Tuan of Children's 
Hospital of Los Angeles and Prof. Ben 
Wu of University of California, Los An- 
geles (UCLA). 

"The group formed spontaneously 
out of a genuine interest for Los An- 
geles area investigators and students to 
meet and share knowledge," said Shaw. 
"It is our hope that by working together 
we can foster new interactions between 
investigators from traditionally disparate 
scientific disciplines." 

For more information about partici- 
pation in LATEI, please contact Shaw at 
(805) 493-3296 or mcshaw@clunet.edu. 



Courtesy of CLU website 



Happy Holidays 
from the Echo staff 



December 10,2003 



Features 



The Echo 5 



By Michael Cabral 
Staff Writer 



Students celebrate holiday season with cultural events 

crown of candles on her head and be led by 
her brothers and sisters to bring bread and 
coffee to their parents during the darkest 
day of the year. The word "Lucia" is de- 
rived from the Latin "light." At CLU, five 
women are chosen by students to represent 
Sankta Lucia. Her representatives and five 
men lead her throughout the ceremony. 
This ceremony, to be held in the Samuel- 
son Chapel, will include the lighting of the 
candles on Sankta Lucia's crown. 

All cultural events at CLU can be 
found in the Cultural Events Guide. This 
fall semester will conclude with the Advent 
Vespers Worship Service, held on Dec. 14 
at 6:15 p.m. in the Samuelson Chapel. 



During the month of December, sev- 
eral holiday events are being held at Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University. Celebrations of 
the African holiday, Kwanza; the Mexican 
holiday. Las Posadas; and the Swedish hol- 
iday. Sankta Lucia are some of the festivals 
that are taking place on campus. 

On Saturday. Dec. 6. from 1 a.m. to 2 
p.m., Kwanza was celebrated in the Preus- 
Brandt Forum. Kwanza was created by Dr. 
Maulana Karenga, a professor and chair of 
Black Studies at California State Univer- 
sity, Long Beach. Based on the harvest, or 
"first fruit," celebration, Kwanza combines 
rituals from the Ashanti and the Zulu. 



"With a joint collaboration of the 
Black Student Union, the Afro-Cen- 
tric Committee of Ventura Country, the 
NAACP Saturday School and the Multi- 
cultural International Program Office, all 
CLU students are welcome to come and 
enjoy the festivities," said Juanita Pryor 
Hall, director of Multicultural and Interna- 
tional Programs. 

"The event includes dancing, mu- 
sic, entertainment, vendors and free soul 
food," said Pryor Hall. 

Following the Kwanza celebration, on 
Sunday, Dec. 7, the Las Posadas and Liv- 
ing Nativity took place. 

"This will include a re-enactment of 
Joseph and Mary's search for lodging," 
said Pryor Hall. 



Las Posadas is a Mexican tradition 
dating back to the 16th century. The event 
starts at the Student Union Building and 
ended at Samuelson Chapel. Students reen- 
acted the story of Mary and Joseph's search 
for shelter by walking through campus and 
knocking on doors of residence halls ask- 
ing for lodging. The event concluded with 
"pandulce" or sweet bread, hot drinks and 
a pifiata. 

The last holiday celebration will be 
heW on Wednesday, Dec. 10 at 10 a.m. 
The celebration of Sankta Lucia Festival 
of Lights will take place. Sankta Lucia 
was a martyr in the year 304 A.D. The 
event started as a family tradition in New 
Sweden during the Advent season. The 
eldest daughter would dress in white with a 



Christmas Festival Concerts delight all with performance 



By Kristina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



The 2003 California Lutheran Univer- 
sity Christmas Festival Concerts kicked 
off a weekend of performances in the 
Samuelson Chapel, beginning on Friday 
December 6. The theme of the concert was 
"Savior of the Nations Come," and was 
performed by the University Symphony, 
conducted by Daniel Geeting, and the CLU 
Women's Chorale and the CLU Choir, both 
conducted by Wyant Morton. 

The night began with the Chorale 
preludes on "Savior of the Nations, Come" 
and the Concertante in B-ftat both played 
by the University Symphony. After a nar- 
ration by Pastor Melissa Maxwell Doherty, 
the Chorale and the Choir sang "Let All 
the Nations Be Gathered Together" before 
making their grand entrance where they 
sang the theme song "Savior of the Na- 



tions, Come." 

There was a wide array of perfor- 
mances throughout the night. Two songs 
that were popular among the audience 
were "Fum, Fum, Fum," and "Whisper, 
Whisper (Baby Born Today)", sung by the 
Women's quartet and the Kingsmen quar- 
tet, respectively. 

"My favorite part was the boys quartet, 
I thought the whole concert was presented 
very well," said senior Jess Nelson. 

CLU senior Joannie Bryan is a mem- 
ber of the choir, as well as the Women's 
quartet. She enjoyed performing in the 
concert, even though a lot of time goes into 
preparing. 

"It's the thing that brings us into the 
Christmas spirit, because the chapel is 
decorated and we're singing music that 
people come and wait on us to watch it," 
Bryan said. "It's a lot of hard work, but it's 
all worth it." 



Listen. 

Process. 
Help. 

Conflicts 

are more 

complex 

than ever. 
Prepare to 
help people 
nanaqe the 



Azusa Pacific University's graduate programs in Psychology offer: 

• An APA-accredited Psy.D. Program 

• An M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy Program 

• A curriculum with a family psychology emphasis that 
integrates spirituality and values 

A blend of theoretical and practical elements of 
psychology 

on about APU's programs in graduate 
psychology, call (626) 815-5008. (800) 825-5278. or visit 
www.apu.edu/educabs/graduate/psychology/. 




AZUSA PACIFIC 

UNIVERSITY 



"It's the thing that brings us 
into the Christmas spirit, 
because the chapel is 
decorated and we're singing 
music that people come and 
wait on us to watch it." 

Joannie Bryan 
Senior 

The presenters displayed their tal- 
entand hard work through the entire con- 
cert. Some other songs that were sung were 
"Freedom is Coming," "Let our Gladness 
Have No End," "A Song to Sing," "What 
Sweeter Music," and "Silent Night," the 
latter which was rearranged by the father 
of a choir member into his own words. The 
audience was also able to sing along on 
well-known Christmas songs such as, "O 
Come, All Ye Faithful," and "Hark, The 



Herald Angels Sing." 

Mary Dahlberg came from the Mount 
Cross-Lutheran Church in Camarillo just 
to see Friday night's concert. 

"It think it's wonderful that they can 
memorize all those lines," Dahlberg said, 
"We come every year and it seems to get 
better each time." 



This year's Christmas Festival 
Concert will be aired on Adelphia 
Cable Channel 25 as follows: 

Friday, December 12, 10 a.m. 

Monday.December 15, 12 p.m. 

Tuesday. December 16, 8 p.m. 

Thursday, December 1 8. 8 p.m. 



At the Getty Museum: 

Dec. 12 

Sculptor Robert Graham 

Dec. 10, 17 

Collection highlights tour 

Dec. 12-13 

"Oedipus the King" 

Dec, 14 

Storytelling with Debra Olson Tolar 

Dec. 17 

Book signing with Rick Rodgers 

Dec. 17 

Director Roger Corman presents "A 

Bucket of Blood" 



For more information contact (310)440-7300 
orvisitwww.getty.edu 



6 The Echo 



Features 



December 10,2003 



Campus Quotes 



What do you like the best about winter holidays? 




William Jennett. psychology, 2004 Samer Chmait, biology/ chemistry, 2004 Patrick Jennett, English, 2007 



Meredith Ebert, communications, 2004 



"Obviously the misteltoe, because you "I like sitting on Santa's lap because I "I like licking the cake bowl after my "The best part about Christmas is the 

get to kiss whoever is under it." like Santa." mom bakes a Christmas cake because it's special feel of the holidays that you get to 

naughty and nice." share with your family and friends." 




Jocelyn Hall, drama, 2005 



Justin Green, undecided. 2006 



Christy Casad, English/liberal studies Rachelle Berglund, psychology, 2004 
2004 
"I love the whole atmosphere and feel- "Getting to see my family and I love "Getting to see my family because I "Going back home to Hawaii because 

ing you get during December." going to midnight mass during Christmas don't get to see them quite often." I get to see my family." 

Eve." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by MaryBei Lopez. Photography by Danny Ermolovich. 



Las Posadas: Mexican culture comes to life at CLU 



By Lindsay Elliott 
Stmt Writer 



Originating in the New World during 
the time of military and religious con- 
quests. Las Posadas, or "inn," is a celebra- 
tion of Joseph and Mary's search for an inn. 
On Sunday, Dec. 7. students gathered at the 
SUB to participate in California Lutheran 
University's rendition of the reenactment 
celebration, 

"Traditionally in Mexico, the celebra- 
tion is held for nine days before Christmas, 
taking place at a different house every 
night." said Dr. Reinhard Teichman. Teich- 
man started the celebration at CLU. ''Here 
at CLU, however, we are only celebrating 
on one night." Students met at the SUB 
and proceeded to several residence halls 
re-enacting the Christmas story, 

"About 30 of us walked around cam- 
pus with students dressed up as Mary and 
Joseph," said junior Grant Smith. "The 
student who played Mary even rode on a 
donkey." 

In Mexico, a group representing Mary 
and Joseph approaches houses and sings 
songs in Spanish requesting a room for 
the night, and recieves replies in a song 



" I find Hispanic culture 
very interesting...! had a lot 
of fun acting out the story 
and learned more about 
another culture at the same 
time." 

Grant Smith 
Junior 

rejecting their plea. On campus, students 
re-enacted this portrayal by proceeding to 
South, Potenberg and Mogen Halls to sing 
Spanish songs outside the residence halls. 

The group travels from house to house, 
or in CLU's case, from hall to hall, until 
someone lets them stay. The house that 
ends up letting them stay will sing the 
songs of rejection but eventually give in 
and sing a verse inviting them in for the 
n : ght. For the participating students, the 
chapel was the place that finally let them 
have a place to stay. 

After the group of people representing 
Mary and Joseph are let in, a large party 
concludes the evening. The chapel was 
transformed into a place where hot choco- 
late and "pandulce," or sweet bread, was 




CLU students and community members sing Spanish songs during Las Posadas. 



served. Two pifiatas were also brought in. 

This is the I Ith year Las Posadas has 
been a part of CLU. thanks to Teichman. 

"We (Teichman and his wife) brought 
the celebration of Las Posadas to CLU 
because at that time we had a very' strong 
L.A.S.O. and the people in the club wanted 
to do something that everyone could par- 
ticipate in,". Teichman said. 



Non-Spanish and Spanish-speaking 
community members and students showed 
up to participate in the activities. 

"I find Hispanic culture very interest- 
ing, so I really wanted to go to this," Smith 
said. "I had a lot of fun acting out the story 
and learned more about another culture at 
the same time." 



December 10, 2003 



Arts 



The Echo 7 



Sheryl Crow's 
new CD is 
something to 
crow about 

By Lindsay Elliott 
Staff Writer 

For the past decade, the songs that 
are featured on Sheryl Crow's newest 
album, "The Very Best of Sheryl Crow" 
(A&M Records) have established the 
Kennett, Miss., soulful singer as having 
a definite impact in the field. 

Musical fads have become dispos- 
able at the hands of the media and its 
listeners, but over the years, Crow has 
remained a constant musical icon. The 
influences on her music are unmistak- 
ably clear on the newest album. Crow's 
collection includes tracings of classic 
rock, country, folk, jazz and blues, but 
remains modem and cutting edge. 

Listeners will be able to find every 
one of Crow's best-known singles on 
"The Very Best...," including the songs 
that initially made her the talented musi- 
cian she is today, such as "Leaving Las 
Vegas" and "All I Wanna Do." On these 
tracks. Crow demonstrates her earlier 
singing style, which was more raw and 
less refined than- what listeners hear on 
more current singles such as "Soak Up 
The Sun." 

Along with "Soak Up The Sun," 
songs such as "A Change Would Do You 
Good" and "Steve McQueen" grace the 
album with their jocular melodies, which 
make every listener want to sing along 
with friends or in the car on a road trip. 

Versatility is Crow's game, as she 
can produce a Top Ten pop single like 
"Soak Up The Sun" or heart-wrench- 
ing folk-influenced pieces like "Strong 
Enough": "Lie to me/I promise I'll 
believe/Lie to me/But please don't 
leave." 

"My Favorite Mistake" is another 
popular single on Crow's album that 
epitomizes the bittersweet, ironic tone 
of many of her songs: "Did you know 
when you go/It's the perfect ending/To 
the bad day I was just beginning/When 
you go all I know is/You're my favorite 
mistake." 

Newer tracks can also be found on 
"The Very Best Of. . . ." Her collaborative 
effort with Kid Rock on "Picture" is on ■ 
the album, along with a country version 
that concludes the album. Crow's new- 
est single. "The First Cut Is The Deep- 
est," which appears on the album, is 
making its mark on music charts across 
the country, but many people do not 
know it is actually a Cat Stevens song. 
Crow's cover cover is a wonderful rendi- 
tion of this expressive, angst-filled tale 
that would make Stevens proud. 

Another new addition to Crow's mu- 
sical collection is an homage to the late 
George Harrison of the Beatles, titled 
"Light In Your Eyes," that is yet to be re- 
leased as a single, but most likely will be 
the next release into mainstream radio. 

"The Very Best of Sheryl Crow" is 
a perfect title for Sheryl Crow's newest 
album. Her music is fun and catchy, raw 
and assertive, melancholy and angst- 
driven, and all of it is worth listening to. 
Sheryl Crow will continue to make 
classic and meaningful music, and also 
continue to be successful in the main- 
stream world; and that's a success that 
not many are able to achieve. 



Chinese Brush Painting in Kwan Fong 
Gallery captures nature's beauty 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Works by artists from the Thousand 
Oaks Chinese Brush Painting and Cal- 
ligraphy Association were displayed in 
the Kwan Fong Gallery in the Humanities 
Building. The display, held from Nov. 23 
to Dec. 5. included paintings of landscapes, 
birds and fish. 

According to Paulina Chang, former 
president of the association. Chinese brush 
painting, which influenced Eastern art, has 
a long history and consists of two basic 
styles. Fine lines and dots characterize the 
basic style, which is more ancient than the 
freestyle, which involves using a brush and 
dark ink on rice paper and is used more 
often by the association. Chang said that 
the rice paper is good for showing mist 
and landscapes. Calligraphy helps with 
the brush painting and is what the artists 
in the association use to learn how to use 
the brush properly, in addition to learning 
Chinese words. 

"We try to capture the visual and spiri- 
tual sense of the beauty of nature," Chang 
said. "You have to practice how to use the 
brush the right way to put spirit into the 
painting. The good way to practice the 
brush is though calligraphy. Each Chinese 
character is art as well; that is why our 
group is not just called painting, it is called 
the Chinese Brush Painting and Calligra- 
phy Association." 

Harry Wang, another past president of 
the association, said that blank space and 
color blending are two other features of 
Chinese brush painting. Blank spaces are 
the white gaps in the colors of the moun- 
tains, landscapes, trees and bamboo of a 
painting. Color blending is giving a leaf, 
for instance, several colors so that it looks 
more natural. A wet brush is dabbed into 
different colors, so that it carries several 
colors at once, and applied to the paper. 



Wang said that getting the amount of water 
right is important, since the paper is very 
absorbent. 

"The brush stroke is very important." 
Wang said. "It's necessary to use a lot of 
chi [energy]." 

The display featured "Forever" and 
"Summer Promenade." both by Wang, 
who has been brush painting for four to 
five years. He said that other masters and 
great paintings by the Chinese and Euro- 
pean Impressionists inspire him. 

"I get a satisfaction from painting 
something we can all enjoy, something I 
can share with my family and friends," 
Wang said. 

"Forever" depicts two cranes and pine 
trees. Wang said that the Chinese like to 
paint cranes and that the birds stay in pairs 
for a long time. 

"Summer Promenade" is a painting of 
two goldfish swimming in a pond. Wang 
also said that fish are very popular in Chi- 
nese paintings and a rough translation of a 
Chinese saying is that "every year there's 
a fish." meaning that there is always food 
every year. 

Current association president Joannes 
Wennink had three paintings in the display: 
"Whispering Mountains," "Bamboo." a 
traditional scroll vvith a bamboo scene, and 
"Wisteria and Koi." 

Wennink said that a Chinese painting 
must have calligraphy when finished. Most 
of the" time, the calligraphy states where 
the painting was made, who the artist is 
and when it was created, using the Chinese 
year. A red seal describing the artist is also 
applied to the painting. 

Wennink said that when a member of 
the association finishes her or his paint- 
ing, she or he consults instructor Harris 
Ha, who has a booklet that is published 
in China and in Chinese, to find the ap- 
propriate calligraphy for the painting. The 
painting is then taken to a specialist who 
backs it up with rice paper and borders it 



with Chinese silk paper, which has to have 
certain dimensions. 

"It's a special booklet that gives sug- 
gestions as to which Chinese phrase to 
use. You have to have a particular Chinese 
phrase to suit that painting." Wennink 
said. 

The direct Chinese translation for 
"Whispering Mountains" is "walking peo- 
ple returning to the rocks echoing words." 
The direct translation for "Bamboo" is 
"rather eat without meat cannot live with- 
out bamboo no meat makes people thin no 
bamboo no culture." The direct translation 
for "Wisteria and Koi" is "relaxed mood 
self happiness." 

Wennink also said that the calligraphy 
describes- the painting directly, indirectly, 
or with a double meaning. 

"If [the painting is| a wedding gift for 
a relative." he said, "the painting, although 
it may be of a flower or a tree, may also say 
a message [in calligraphy] to the relative, 
such as 'happiness.'" 

The association conducts classes, at 
$15 per class, for adults and children every 
other Saturday at Thousand Oaks High 
School. The adult class is from 9 a.m. to 
1 1 :30 a.m. and materials are provided. 

According to Wang. 50 percent of the 
current members of the association are 
non-Chinese speaking. Most of the people 
who attend the classes are primarily from 
Thousand Oaks. 

"We started out with Chinese par- 
ents who brought their kids to the 
Chinese school," Wang said. "The idea 
is that we're not a group that's limited 
to the Chinese community; our goal is 
to be able to share the Chinese culture. 
We like to invited the Chinese- and 
non-Chinese-speaking communities 
to come share with us and look at our 
exhibit. I think the more we learn about 
each other, the more we understand 
each other and it makes the world a 
better place." 



CLU's Toys for Tots aids needy children 



By Kaytie St. Pierre 
Staff Writer 



The holiday season often inspires 
feelings of giving and helping, and it is 
no different for the students at California 
Lutheran University. The Community Ser- 
vice Center decided to participate in the 
national Toys for Tots project. 

Toys for Tots is an organization started 
by the U.S. Marine Corp reserve to collect 
toys for children, ranging in ages of new- 
born to 18 years old. who would normally 
not have a Christmas. 

"1 like this program because people 
can drop off anything that they think they 
themselves would have liked as a kid," said 
Angela Rowley, coordinator for Commu- 
nity Service. "All toys are accepted — from 
Hot Wheels and Barbie dolls to crayons 
and markers." 

This is the first year that CLU has 
participated in the program, and it is also a 



" I like this program 
because people can drop 
off anything that they 
think they themselves 
would have liked as a 
kid." 

Angela Rowley 
Coord for Community Service 

follow-up program to last month's Opera- 
tion Christmas Child project. Usually, the 
Community Service Center participates in 
the Adopt-a-Family program for Christ- 
mas, but this year the focus is on needy 
children. 

"We thought of doing Toys for Tots 
because the program's entire focus is on 
spreading joy and hope for children during 
the holidays." said freshman Jennifer Main, 
student community service coordinator. "It 
is also an easy project for students to get 



involved in. If we have a pretty positive 
response, hopefully we will make Toys 
for Tots an annual part of Christmas time 
at CLU." 

The Community Service Center ex- 
pects students to be very supportive. 

"When it comes to children, the stu- 
dents at CLU have a real passion to help 
those in need," Rowley said. "We always 
have a very good response from the stu- 
dents here. Our projects are always really 
supported." 

Boxes are set up in the SUB, Humani- 
ties Building, and chapel. To participate 
in this project, bring any unwrapped gift 
and drop off in one of the boxes before 
Dec. 17. 

"My favorite part about this project is 
having that you are giving children around 
the nation gifts that wouldn't normally 
have a Christmas," said Peter Burgwald, 
student coordinator of community service. 
"Brightening up their day makes me feel 
uood inside." 



Don't fear finals — Stressbusters is here! Receive massages, 



pedicures ana more: uec. iu lrum o p.m.-xu p.m. m wc 
Kwan Fong Gallery. Questions? Call Sally Sagen at x3320. 



8 The Echo 



Opinion 



Dcembi-r 10,2003 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following date: 

December 17, 2003 



A call for justice in Ohio 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



Police union officials in Cincinnati, 
Ohio said last Friday that they would not 
change established procedure when deal- 
ing with violent offenders. This statement 
came days after police procedure led to the 
death of Nathaniel Jones. 

According to an interview conducted 
by BET.com with Cincinnati police officer 
Lt. Kurt Boyd, Nathaniel Jones had not 
committed a crime, but mumbled deroga- 
tory comments when police officers ques- 
tioned him outside of a White Castle res- 
taurant. Jones then moved slowly toward 
the officers, who responded by spraying 
him with mace. After being sprayed with 
mace, Jones lunged at one the officers and 
hit him in the face. After provoking Jones 



to violence, police officers beat him death. 
Later in the week, the coroner concluded 
that Jones death was a homicide. 

While the above is disturbing, 1 was 
shocked and appalled to my bitter, bitter 
core to learn that both the mayor of Cincin- 
nati, Charlie Luken, and the Chief of Police, 
Thomas Streicher, said that they approved 
of the way police officers handled the situ- 
ation. I am not a trained law enforcement 
officer, but I can say with confidence, that 
any policy or procedure that results in the 
death of an unarmed man is unacceptable. 
In this country, we believe that suspects are 
innocent until proven guilty, regardless of 
how the suspect behaves in police custody. 
He or she should have a chance to stand 
trail before an educated judge and jury of 
peers. Even if found guilty in a court of 
law, criminals are protected by the eighth 
amendment that "cruel and unusual pun- 
ishments" will not be inflicted upon them. 
Police officers struck Jones 40 times with 
metal nightsticks before subduing him. 
Being beaten to death is more than cruel; 
it is sick. 

The coroner's report indicated that 
Jones had PCP and cocaine in his blood 
system and suffered from an enlarged 
heart. However, he stated that Jones would 
be alive today if it had not been for the 
altercation with police. Even though Jones 



had drugs in his blood stream and attacked 
an officer, that does not justify his treat- 
ment by police. 

It is difficult for a suspect who is be- 
ing beaten to submit before serious injury 
occurs. The natural reaction when being 
beaten is to defend oneself or fight back. 
The officers should have stopped hitting 
Jones for a few seconds to give him a 
chance to surrender. This course of action 
would not have put the officers in risk of 
injury because Jones was unarmed and the 
ground. Perhaps, if these police officers 
had used more discretion, Jones would be 
alive today. Police supporters may claim 
that such procedure is dangerous or other- 
wise unwarranted, but many disagree. For 
example, Nathaniel Livingston, co-chair of 
the Coalition for a Just Cincinnati, pointed 
out a recent incident in which an escaped 
cow became aggressive and charged pe- 
destrians. Instead of beating the cow into 
submission, police blocked off the area for 
three days and eventually returned the cow 
unharmed. 

Police officers did not protect or serve 
Nathaniel Jones; instead, they beat him to 
death. Re-evaluation of police procedures 
and effective implementation of non-le- 
thal weapons must occur immediately. In 
America, justice should not be dispensed 
by police officers with nightsticks. 



How to make a marriage last 



By Jon Acquisti 
Columnist 



Everyone dreams of getting married 
and finding that special person to spend 
their life with. However, marriage today 
is much different then what it once was. 
Divorce is rampant. A present day census 
show that about one-half of all marriages 
end in divorce. 

Why has this number jumped so dras- 
tically in the last few decades? I believe the 
sanctity of marriage is not as strong as it 
once was. People are getting married now 
just for the joy of getting married, rather 
than for the bond of two lovers. 

I am happy to say that my parents are 
renewing their wedding vows on Dec. 27 
after 25 years of marriage. I was asked to 
speak during the ceremony, and for the 
first time 1 have found myself at a lost for 
words. 

How do you speak about a topic you 
have very little knowledge about? Then it 
dawned on me that I do have full knowl- 
edge of their relationship. I am their third 
child, their baby. I have witnessed 19 years 
of their marriage through good times and 
bad. 



Below is a section of the speech that I 
have prepared to read at the ceremony. As 
personal as it may be to me, it also reflects 
the aspects of marriage I have found to be 
special. 

"Nineteen years ago our family was 
complete. Now, with a party of five and a 
house of our own, our family was ready to 
embark upon an unbelievable and incred- 
ible journey. Marriage is more than just 
vows and promises. 

"My parents have had their fair share 
of trouble throughout these many years. It 
was not until I left to go- to college that I 
truly gained an appreciation for my parents 
and their commitment to each other. Never 
before have I seen two people so commit- 
ted to their children and to one another. 
They have sacrificed so much for the edu- 
cation of my sister, my brother and I. Their 
priorities were dropped and ours were put 
into action immediately. 

"My parents have always operated as a 
singular parental unit. Never once did they 
fall for the behind-the-other-parent's back 
trick. They have always stood as parents 
and friends to all three of their children 
equally. Kris and Rick have always put 
education above all others. Maybe my 



mother has a bias, being a teacher; how- 
ever the results have forever changed the 
ways in which we view the world. School 
trips and vacations have never only been 
for pleasure. 

"My parents encouraged the thirst for 
knowledge and the desire to teach to never 
be pushed aside. There is always some- 
thing to learn, as well as to teach. 

■ "My parents live simple, yet remark- 
able, lives. For 19 years they have sacri- 
ficed more than anyone can even begin to 
explain. Not only have they taught me the 
importance of family, but also the founda- 
tions for how I want to life my life. Never 
once was I denied the chance for success. 
Instead, I was encouraged to take risks and 
live life to the fullest. Life is too short not 
to do what you love. 

"I am successful now at the age of 19 
because 1 have two parents who love and 
support each other, a brother and a sister 
who assist each other in any task, and a 
sense of security that can never be dented. I 
am truly blessed. Rarely in life can you feel 
such unbelievable amounts of support. 

"For me, life would not be the same if 
the love that existed now did not exist as 
strong as it did over 19 years ago." 



The 



Echo Staff 



Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 
Business Manager 

Karen Peterson 
News Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Arts & Features Editor 

Angela Fentiman 
Sports Editor 



Brandee Tecson 
Opinion Editor 

Kyle Peterson 
Photo Editor 

Nicholas Andersen 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Leah Juergens 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 

Adviser 



Editorial Matter: The staff of Ihe Bella welcome* comments 
00 lu articles II well as on the newspaper itself However. Ihe 
staff acknowledges ihul opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent Ihe views of the ASCLU or of California Lulheron 
Universily. The Echo reserves Ihe righl to edit all stories, 
cdlloriuls, letters to the editor and other suhmissions for spuce 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the adverti: 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in die advertisement* themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for Informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
constmed as u written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (80?) 493-3865 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity, 60 West Olseu Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 92360:787 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fax: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 
echottvclunct cdu 



December 10,2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



Has free 
speech gone 
too far? 



NASA needs a makeover 



By Brian Roberts 
Columnist 



In America, there are many freedoms 
we possess that other countries around 
the world do not. The death penalty, in 
particular, is a disputed law between 
the European and the American govern- 
ments, sometimes causing conflicts over 
the conditions that certain international 
criminals are handed over. 

In Rwanda this past week, three 
journalists were jailed for life after they 
were convicted of playing a major role in 
inciting extremists to carry out 100-day 
slaughters against a different ethnicity. 
In Britain, the government has estab- 
lished libel and slander laws restricting 
certain events or instances being report- 
ed on air or in their newspapers. But here 
in the good oP US of A, free speech is 
alive and well, and that is something that 
makes our country great - or, at least, it 
used to. 

Free speech in the United States has 
taken a drastic turn since the days of 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt and John F. 
Kennedy, and now it looks like a car spi- 
raling out of control. Last week, Ameri- 
ca witnessed the most extreme form of 
free speech ever seen. Hollywood's elite 
celebrities and many money brokers 
gathered in Beverly Hills to organize and 
streamline fundraising efforts to unseat 
President George W. Bush. The name of 
the event was titled "Hate Bush 12/2," 
marking it as their official day to bash 
the current president 

Now, doesn't the name of this sound 
like the sort of thing conservatives would 
invent to make liberals look stupid and 
open the conservative spigots? But it 
was not - and I see a major problem with 
that event taking place. 1 have no beef 
with protesters or activists against the 
war, or free speech for that matter, but 
this is where it crosses the line. 

Back in February and March of this 
year, protesters called Bush a "war mon- 
ger" and pled for the U.S. to love others, 
wage peace and not hate. Although, when 
the tables are turned, hatred seems to be 
acceptable for liberals, especially when 
it is toward the President. This is when 
free speech has gone too far. When Clin- 
ton sat in the Oval Office for eight years, 
CEO's, Christians and the blue collar 
district, which are frequently classified 
as GOP lovers by the left, never staged 
rallies when he raised taxes or vetoed 
partial-birth abortion bans. Where were 
Hollywood's elite when Clinton decided 
to attack other countries and spread our 
military thin around the world? 

The last thing this country needs 
is hate, and for Tinseltown to come out 
and support it against our chosen leader, 
is something not to be admired. Matt 
Drudge of the Drudge Report broke the 
story about the hate meeting and received 
much feedback about how the event 
was not about hate, but free speech. As 
Drudge pointed out in his column, why 
then was the event named "Hate Bush 
12/2"? This was no right-wing con- 
spiracy. Matt Drudge may be the person 
selling the fact that Hollywood held the 
meeting, but he didn't come up with the 
title. That was a self-inflicted wound, yet 
again by Hollywood liberals giving hon- 
est politics a bad name. 



By Devon Bostock 
Columnist 



According to recent news, the race for 
space has been revived after thirty-some 
years. The Bush administration apparently 
feels it is important for the United States to 
make it to the moon again. 

So we are now engaged in a race with 
China, who has just put its first person into 
space, to make it back to the moon. The 
plan is said to require approximately $175 
billion in funding. 

The problem is that NASA has been 
under fire for quite a while now. They have 
been criticized as being inefficient and dis- 
organized. They are in desperate need of a 
makeover before the American public has 
enough. 

The Bush administration: What better 
makeover than to once again stir up the 
emotions of a moon landing? 

Thinking back on the first landing, 
what have we done since? Billions and 
billions of dollars have been poured into 
the NASA program and very little tangible 
data has come out of it. 

We have launched several satellites 
into deep space. The result: several failed 
missions, costing billions of dollars, and 
some nice pictures. In addition we have 



lost two space shuttles and several astro- 
nauts in the past twenty years. 

I used to believe in the space program, 
but perhaps this country is looking too far 
ahead. 

Several individuals have been quoted 
as saying the administration is interested 
in not only landing on the moon again, but 
also possibly creating a base. Obviously, 
this will have a price tag of its own and it 
won't be cheap. 

This statement having been made, 
many scientists have jumped on the band- 
wagon, some even going as far as to bring 
Mars into the equation. Roger Launius, a 
space historian at the Smithsonian, epito- 
mized this in his statement to USA Today, 
"If we are to really going to get off this 
planet and go to a place like Mars, we've 
got to leam how to operate in deep space." 

The last time a mission to Mars was 
considered was back during the Bush Sr 
administration. At that time it came with a 
price tag of $400 billion. 

The price to save Iraq doesn't seem 
half as bad now. Regardless, Mars is way 
too far ahead. I think we need to remember 
how to put astronauts into space without 
disintegrating them. 

Maybe some of the money being 
dumped into probes that take 15 years to 



take a picture of Jupiter before they dive 
bomb into the planet and disappear, should 
be put into upgrading the shuttles that 
haven't blown up. The technology needs to 
be brought up to date before we as a coun- 
try should even think about condoning any 
more "deep space" missions. 

Let's hold off on the moon base for a 
while and do the things that are necessary 
for the space program to even make it that 
far. 

Worst case scenario: China becomes 
the second country to land a man on the 
moon. It isn't like we own it. In fact, if any- 
one is planning to build a base on the moon 
it should be a community effort. 

It is a step that could benefit the world 
so there is no reason not to expect the world 
to pay for it. Several countries, including 
China, are already interested in creating 
a base. If anyone is to go ahead with the 
plan, everyone should be involved. 

There is no matter of national prestige 
at stake. The moon does offer valuable sci- 
entific data but it is not worth "racing" to. 

We need to slow down and approach 
this carefully so that it gets done right. 

If NASA rushes into this and some- 
thing goes wrong, their funding, and more 
importantly, American confidence, may 
never return. 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Echo. 



This letter is in response to "Closed- 
minded in an open world." Your first 
sentence says, "It seems here at CLU, the 
students are closed minded when it comes 
to appreciating other forms of religion." 
First, how are you making this claim? The 
least you could've done was provide a few 
instances where other forms of religions 
on campus were under appreciated. Save 
yourself the embarrassment of sound- 
ing like a fool and stick to either facts or 
personal experiences you could've used as 
examples instead of generalizing assump- 
tions. One of your points was that people 
should be less judgmental and yet, you are 
judging all CLU students. 

Second, can you define spirituality? 
You use the term "spiritual" so broadly 
it could mean anything from being truly 
spiritual to just appreciating the earth. 1 
believe the way to a stronger spirituality 
comes from the practice of religion and 
the rituals that accompany it. For example, 
daily scripture reading, reflection, church- 
going, fasting, whatever the rituals for 
your particular faith is, builds morality and 
strength of character which in turn lead to a 
closer relationship with God and hence the 
strengthening of spirituality. Spirituality 
based on nothing is exactly that or merely 
superficiality. Just because you pet animals 
and recycle doesn't make you spiritual. 
True spirituality takes work- 
Third, you stated that a person's spiri- 
tuality, religiosity, or lack thereof, "should 
not matter to anyone but that student." 
Who are you to judge people who do think 
it matters? If I am a Christian, and I believe 
a person's salvation depends on whether or 
not they accept Christ in their life, then my 
thinking it matters is important to me and 
my set of beliefs. So 1 think you should stop 
being intolerant of what people believe to 
be important. I think it is people like you 
who go around worrying about people like 
me that are actually the intolerant ones. 
Perhaps you are intolerant because you are 
actually insecure with your set of beliefs 
and "spirituality." 

Fourth, "That is the beauty of this 



world. We are given the freedom to prac- 
tice what we desire." Are you even aware 
of the over 60 countries on this planet that 
persecute Christians and other minority 
religions? It is THIS COUNTRY; based on 
Judeo-Christianity that gives people free- 
dom of religion, certainly not "this world." 
Look at http://www.persecution.com. That 
is reality; stop living in denial. 

Fifth, "religion, especially Christian- 
ity, does not seem to leave anything open 
for interpretation." Are you insane? How 
many different translations of the Bible 
are there? (A lot.) How many different 
languages has the Bible been translated 
in? (Hundreds.) How many darn Christian 
denominations are there in this country? 
(Over 200.) What religion stresses the im- 
portance of a personal God? Are you sure 
you were raised Christian? Let's compare 
with Islam. What language is the only 
language a Moslem must read the Koran in 
to really understand its message? Arabic. 
How many languages is that? How many 
interpretations is that? ONE. 

Sixth, "It seems that people who are 
highly religious are not very tolerant of 
people who practice other's faiths." (By 
the way, it's OTHER faiths.) On the con- 
trary, people who are genuinely religious 
are actually supportive and encouraging of 
other people's religions. It's the secularists 
and those who are insecure about who they 
are and what they believe that get easily of- 
fended and intolerant. You are so illogical 
it hurts me. And why do I have to "appreci- 
ate other forms of religion?" Why is that 
your agenda? As long as 1 treat people with 
dignity and respect, who says I have to ap- 
preciate, their religion? 

In this day in age, Christianity is 
the most tolerant religion. You think you 
would be able to publish an anti-Christian 
article at a Christian school if Christians 
were, in fact, so intolerant? You know what 
would happen if you spoke against Islam 
in Cairo or anywhere in the Middle East? I 
don't even want to tell you, but that's why 
my family moved to this country. 

Seventh, "everyone is searching for 
something greater." Where do you live 11 
Ever heard of atheists? Those are people 



who don't believe in God or any higher 
power and who have no interest whatso- 
ever in "searching for something greater," 
because they don't believe in anything 
greater than themselves. 

Eighth, "Life is not about judging oth- 
ers. It is not even about judging yourself." 
What is wrong with you? The unexamined 
life is not worth living! If you don't judge 
yourself against any criteria than you have 
no apparent conscience and therefore are 
not attempting to live under any moral or 
ethical codes. How is a person supposed to 
get better,' improve, change and so forth? 
Examining and reflecting upon one's 
conscience is the most important thing a 
person can do. And you call yourself "ex- 
tremely spiritual?" 

Ninth. "It is about living in the pres- 
ent and making choices that you feel are 
right." No, Jon, it's not. The purpose of life 
is to be good and spread goodness. Making 
choices you feel are right is politically cor- 
rect baloney. 

If that's true, then those Columbine 
murderers definitely had it right because 
when they had those guns in hand they 
were certainly "living in the moment" and 
certainly so when they're shooting their 
teachers in the head was the right thing to 
do. Awesome, Jon, good advice. There are 
some things that are right and some things 
that are wrong. Some things are obvious, 
others not, and still others depend on the 
situation but regretfully, if humans fol- 
lowed only their "feelings" instead of their 
brains, than we'd be in whole lot more crap 
than we are now. 

Tenth, "with an open mind and accep- 
tance for all, life can never be truly bad." 
Wrong again. I will not accept "all." I will 
not accept murderers, I will not accept 
Militant Islamic Jihad. I will not accept the 
idea of moral relativism and I certainly will 
not accept your illogic and lack of clarity. 
Doing so is harmful and dangerous. 

Stop confusing intolerance with strong 
convictions and belief. 

Simone M. Rizkallah 
Marketing Communication 
Class of 2003 



10 The Ec 



Sports 



December 10,2003 




Senior Zareh Avedian shoots a jumper 
during the WCBC game. 



Ron Russ guard* a West Coast Baptist opponent during the Kingsmen s 94-61 victory. 



Photographs by k\k- Peterson 
Senior Ryan Hodges makes a layup 
against WCBC. 



Kingsmen baseketball starts season 3-1 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
men's basketball team had a hot start this 
season, winning three of their first four 
games. 

The Kingsmen won their first game 
76-75 at Chapman on a lay-up in the final 
seconds by junior Ron Russ. 

The game was a close one throughout 
with the Kingsmen holding a four-point 
advantage at the halftime break. 

"Playing the first game on the road is 
always difficult. It was a close back-and- 
forth game all the way. Whoever had the 
last possession was going to win. and Russ 
had a big offensive rebound and a put-back. 
It was a good win," Hodges said. 

CLU was led by senior Zareh Avedian, 
who put up 27 points and pulled down six 
rebounds. 

Freshman Brandon Bush showed no 
signs of nerves in his first collegiate game, 
scoring 15 points, and shooting three for 
four from the three-point line. 



The Kingsmen's second game was 
even closer than the first, as they hosted 
the University of Mary. 

Avedian knocked down two free 
throws with only a couple seconds left 
in regulation to give CLU a three-point 
advantage. 

Mary's Matt Barton answered with 
a bank shot from beyond the three-point 
line at the buzzer to send the game into 
overtime. 

The teams played two overtime peri- 
ods with several lead changes and it wasn't 
until the final three point shot by Mary 
went awry at the end of the second over- 
time that CLU secured a 1 1 -98 victory. 

"Our attitude wasn't that they had 
momentum going into overtime," Hodges 
said. "We weren't going to let a lucky shot 
beat us." 

Avedian and Hodges led the way for 
the Kingsmen. Hodges shot nine for 14 
from the field finishing with 27 points, 
eight rebounds, two blocked shots and two 
steals. Avedian ended the game with 3 1 
points and four rebounds. 

"We were just running our offense," 



Hodges said. "[Avedian) is a playmaker so 
he just made a lot of plays and I had all the 
guys really setting me up well in the post. 
It's really hard to stop when you have to 
guys who can score in the post." 

Russ and Bush combined to provide 
most of the outside threat for the CLU 
offense shooting five of nine from three- 
point range, finishing the night with 16 
points each. 

After two close games, the Kingsmen 
returned to the court, crushing West Coast 
Baptist 94-6 1. 

"That's a game where you want to get 
up early so that you can get the subs in to 
the game because those are the guys who 
are getting us ready in practice, and they 
work just as hard as anybody, so they de- 
serve a chance to get some playing time. 
It's important as well because you never 
know who's going to be needed later in the 
year," Hodges said. 

Five Kingsmen finished the game 
with double digits, led by Avedian with 18 
points. Freshman Phillip Lehmann came 
off the bench and scored 14 points. 

Junior point guard Man Adame dished 



out 1 1 assists and recorded four steals 
while only committing one turnover. 

Russ and sophomore Greg Grier were 
the leading rebounders for the Kingsmen 
finishing with six apiece. 

The Kingsmen defense forced West 
Coast Baptist into 22 turnovers and held 
them to .41 percent shooting. 

CLU's winning streak came to and end 
in their next game as they fell at California 
Baptist by a score of 7 1 -63. 

"Obviously it's always tough to lose, 
but that's a good team and it's always 
tough to play on the road. I thought we did 
a nice job of competing though," Hodges 
said. 

After leading 63-62 with only a few 
minutes to ptay, CLU watched as Baptist 
ran off the last nine points of the game. 

"We just had a couple turnovers and 
things didn't go our way in the last few 
minutes, but we watched some tape and 
it was good for us. We learned from it," 
Hodges said. 

Hodges led the CLU offense with 19 
points and grabbed six rebounds. Russ 
added 13 points to the Kingsmen effort. 



Eight Kingsmen football Faculty/staff dominate 
players named All-SCIAC first-ever CLU Ballin' 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen football team closed its 
2003 season with eight players named to 
the All-SCIAC team. 

On defense, senior Pat Casteel was 
named First Team All-SCIAC, finishing 
with 47 solo tackles and 32 assisted tackles 
as well as one interception. 

Casey O' Brian also received First 
Team honors after finishing the year with 
1 5 solo tackles and 16 assisted tackles and 
eight sacks. 

"We had a good season; we finished 
second place. 1 think this was my most pro- 
ductive season I've had since being here," 
O'Brian said. " We had some good players 
and it was nice to see them get credit for 
their work." 

Ryan Tukua was also named to the 
A11-SCA1C First Team and completed the 
season with 21 solo tackles 19 assisted and 
two sacks. 

On offense, Jimmy Fox received First 
Team honors after finishing the season 
with 779 yards receiving and seven touch- 
downs, as well as 86 yards rushing with 



one rushing touchdown. 

"I had a great time this season. We had 
good team chemistry and I think that was a 
big part of our success. All these guys put 
in a lot of hard work to get to this point, 
and there is a lot of talented players in con- 
ference, so it's a real honor," Fox said. 

Senior Kyle Wells was also named 
First Team All-SCIAC for his excellent 
season on the offensive line, and fellow 
linemen Sean Brosnan was named to the 
Second Team. 

Also receiving recognition as members 
of the All-SCIAC Second Team for their 
efforts on the field were Quinn Longhurst 
and Joe Henle. Longhurst had a team-high 
11 sacks as well as 19 solo and 19 assisted 
tackles. Henle finished with 19 solo and 20 
assisted tackles, as well as seven sacks. 

"We had some big-time players this 
year, and it's always nice to see them get 
recognition. We finished at the top in a lot 
of statistical categories. 1 think there were 
more guys who could have easily been 
right there. We have some spots to fill now 
with some of these guys leaving, so we are 
looking to have a big recruiting class and 
get back at it," Head Coach Scott Squires 
said. 



By Justin Shore 
Staff Writer 



The faculty defeated the students by a 
score of 60-55 in the CLU Ballin' basket- 
ball game Dec. 3. 

The faculty jumped to an early lead, 
with the students struggling with their 
shooting. The faculty /staff team stretched 
a 20-point lead prior to halftime. 

"The students could not make shots 
and the faculty was making lots of shots, 
and seemed to be much more organized," 
said Cristie Tripedda, a spectator. 

"I was glad to see the teachers beat 
the students. I had a great time," said Nick 
Teslic. 

The faculty/staff team was led by Nate 
Fall, coordinator of fitness and recreation, 
who made several no-look and behind-the- 
back passes look easy. 

CLU Ballin' was organized by the 
Student Capital Campaign Committee as a 
fundraiser for the North Campus project. 

Overall the game raised $203 for the 
CLU's new athletic facilities according to 
the SCCC. 

"We were hoping [we would earn] 




Photograph by Rachael Carver 

Nate Fall brings the ball up the court for 
the faculty/staff team. 

more, but we really didn't have anything 
to compare it to," organizer Nicole Hack- 
barth said. "The event was really fun and 
we hope to do something similar next se- 
mester and in years to come." 



Sports 



December 10, 2003 



The Echo 11 



Regals basketball records first win of season 



By Lindsey Rarick 
Stakf Writer 



Women's Basketball Loses in Double 
Overtime 

The California Lutheran University 
women's basketball team lost 103-93 to 
UC Santa Cruz in double overtime at the 
CLU Gymnasium Tuesday in the Regals' 
home opener. 

In the first half, the Regals shot 42.9 
percent from the field, but UC Santa Cruz 
nailed 1 7 out of its 33 shots, shooting 5 1 .5 
percent in the first half. 

Defensively, Cal Lutheran was fol- 
lowing their plan of attack, but the Banana 
Slugs' offense was difficult to control. 

"Santa Cruz is a really good team, and 
we knew that going into it," sophomore 
captain Alex Mallen said. 

In the second half, the Regals stepped 
up their game, tightening their defense and 
out shooting UCSC 38-30. After being 
behind for most of the game, Cal Lutheran 
tied the score to take the game into over- 
time. 

"That was the best that we've played. 
We've never played that hard. We played 
with heart and our coaches were proud of 
our effort," Mallen said. 

The score remained tied after the first 
overtime period. 

"We wanted to get steals and try to get 
momentum our way. This game was all 
about momentum; it was going both ways. 
We had to get steals, not give the ball away 
and execute on offense," Head Coach 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Sophomore point guard Alex Mallen brings the ball up the court for the Regals during 
the their 103-93 double overtime loss to UC Santa Cruz. 

With their first win, the Regals im- 



Kristy Hopkins said. 

UC Santa Cruz dominated the second 
overtime period, out-shooting Cal Lu- 
theran 16-6, resulting in a final score of 
103-93. Despite the loss, the Regals were 
still very happy with the game. 

"We came from behind and took the 
lead. They played so hard. They played the 
hardest out of any team we've had here at 
Cal Lutheran," Hopkins said. 

Regals Get First Win Over Bethany 

The Regals basketball team achieved 
its first win of the season with a 75-67 de- 
feat of Bethany College (Calif.) at the CLU 
Gymnasium Friday, Dec. 5. 



proved their overall record to 1-2, while 
the Bruins fell to 1-2. 

Cal Lutheran took the lead early In 
the game, but Bethany College was able 
to catch up later in the half. The Regal 
defense used their trap to slow down the 
offense of their opponents. 

"We forced 27 turnovers from our 
trap. We had quite a few steals that came 
from our trap. Valerie [Pifia] alone had five 
steals." Hopkins said. 

Despite CLU's defensive efforts, the 
offensive efforts were not as effective in 
the first half. The Regals shot 39 percent 
from the field in the first half 



"We had fast breaks but we just didn't 
make the lay-ups. We didn t finish our easy 
opportunities," freshman Caroline Beddow 
said. 

The Regals entered the locker room 
for their halftlme talk with Bethany at a 
40-38 advantage. 

"A couple of players just needed to 
step It up. They needed to turn it on and 
play. We were turning the ball over so I 
told them Ihey need lo play smarter," Hop- 
kins said. 

The CLU offense turned It on in the 
second half and played harder offensively, 
while still maintaining their solid trapping 
on defense. The Regals outshot Bethany 
37-27, which resulted In the 75-67 Cal 
Lutheran win. 

"We came out of the locker room after 
the first half and just stepped it up because 
we knew what we needed to do. We knew 
we Just needed to play harder and with 
more effort. We were playing (o their level 
In the first half," Mallen said. 

Mallen had a game-high 20 points, Ju- 
lie Clchon had 17 and Lauren Stroot had a 
double-double with 18 points and a game- 
best 12 rebounds. 

Defensively, Mallen and Cichon had 
four steals each. 

"Offensively, we did fine with 75 
points. That's 20 more than we would 
have had last year. We had three players 
in double figures. We have enough talent 
on our team where we don't have to rely 
on just one player to do all of the scoring." 
Hopkins said. 



The Echo is looking for a Sports Editor 

If you are interested in the posistion contact Dr. Dm Pagliassotti 
E-mail: paglia@clunet.edu Office Phone: x3374 



Start Your Career P 



: ".",!',V j 



The Next Stage* 




Park Oaks Shopping Center (VeVs Plaza) 

1710 N. Moorpark Rd.« Thousand Oaks, CA ')! ibl) 

(805) 777-8866 • Fax: (805) 777-8868 



in* 

\U 'I'M,...,, >( I 
SAT'hlLimJ.ll^ 



Professional Packaging & Supplies • Private Mailboxes (personal/business) • Greeting Cards 



• U S Postal Servioes 
■ Fax Services 

• Printing Services (business cards etc) 

fed: Authori/x'il Shi|A'nter' 



■ Large Format Copying 

■ Photocopies 
Passport Photos 

lOMPEtrofts cojw: 



1 Notary Services 
' BulkMailmq 
' Laminating 



S»Bd 



1 MONTH 
FREE 

with 3 month Mailbox 



Rental 



694 COLOR i 
COPIES 

8 1 // x 1 1 . 24S paper. 
Limit 100 



34B&W 
COPIES 

8Vj"x 11. Single-sided. 
Limit SOD 



[athhclMrtCmlwimfc ■ ■ 



Join our exciting new 
Personal Banker Trainee Program! 

We'll train you on customer profiling, product knowledge, investment products, time 
management, teleconsulting, and other areas to ensure your success. You will also be 
trained on and sit for the Series 7 and 66 brokerage licensing exams. After 3-4 months' 
training, you will be placed as a Personal Banker in a retail branch near your home. 
Personal Bankers sell banking products & services, manage customer portfolios, service 
relationships, and cross-sell all products & services with the goal of attaining 1 00% of the 
customers' business. 

Trainee positions and subsequent Personal Banker assignments are available throughout 
greater Los Angeles, Ventura County, Santa Barbara, and the Santa Clarlta areas. 
Program begins January 26, 2004. 

To set up an interview, e-mail your resume to: 
fowarhp@wellsfargo.com 

wellsfargo.com/jobs 

Weill largo ii an AffirnutrW Actioo/f quil Oppod unity Employ*! 



Jesus is Coming! 

WELS Campus Ministry and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church invite you to 

join them for confessional Lutheran Bible Class and Worship. 

The Sunday morning Bible Class at 8:30AM is studying the life of Abraham. 

Through Abraham, God foreshadows the world's salvation in Jesus Christ. 

Just as God provided the sacrifice for Abraham and Isaac, He provides you 

with Jesus Christ -the'TambofGod who takes awayjhtiMb! 'I" '■■ ii! ' il 

Bible Class is followed by traditional Worship 

at 9:30am. Join with the Church this 

Advent season in preparing for Christ's 

coming! 

For more information on the WELS 

Campus Ministry, to join our e-mail 

list, or for a free devotional booklet, 

e-mail elu@princeojpeace-web.org. 

^rrL. - townee of ZPeace 

r.prin ceofpeace-wels.org 




ffiOUIES SO FAST, 

YOU'LL 

BE mERRY. 



Now you can get MOVIES IN MINUTES™ 

at Movielink, the leading broadband movie download service. 

Download top quality movie files to watch at home or on the road. 

No subscription, no late fees and no spyware. 



COLLEGE.IVIOVIEUNK.COM 



Runs l?5^ 
great ^^^? 

on ^^.„ 



'""<* "^CH,,., 



IfGiS 



Download your first movie for 

99i or less!* 




Movielink 



TM 



©2003 Movielink, LLC. *Limited time offer. Terms and conditions apply. Prices may vary. See college.movielink.com for details. 

Centrino. the Intel Centrino logo and Intel Inside logo are trademarks or registered trademarks ot Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. 
CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE O 2003 Columbia Pictures Industries. Inc. All Rights Reserved. WHALE RIDER © 2003 Sony Pictures Television International. All Righls Reserved. 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 13 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Kingsmen Basketball defeats 
Pomona-Pitzer, 62-60. 



See story page 8 



February 4, 2004 



Features 

Multimedia students display design 
journal material in Kwan Fong. 



See story page 5 



News 

CLU looks forward to national 
library workshop. 



See story page 3 



Racism, theft taint end of semester 



By Devon Bostock 
News Editor 



Swastikas and racist statements were 
written on posters on the door of room 
1209 in Potenberg Hall last Dec. 18, 
2003. A series of robberies also marked 
the semester's end. 

According to Security Manager Klay 
Peterson, there were no witnesses and no 
one has been implicated in the incident. 

"We are taking this very seriously. It 
is being treated as a hate crime," Peterson 
said. 

Several of the occupants of tile apart- 
ment are of Hispanic descent, including 
Saul Aguilar. Aguilar said he left the apart- 
ment around 9:45 a.m. to use a printer in 
the library, and when he returned at around 
10:15 a.m., he found the graffiti. 

"Racism is illogical and ignorant. It 
has no place in this society. This was a 
cowardly act" Aguilar said. "I may not 
always agree with people's perspectives, 
but I will accept them if they come and 
discuss it with me, face to face." 

The vandalism has renewed interest 
on campus in the nature of racism and 
hate crimes. On Jan. 29, an open forum 
discussion in Potenberg Hall dealt with 
the incident and racism in general. 

In addition, the President's Office has 
created a special committee to deal with 
cultural diversity on campus called the 
President's Diversity Council. 



"Racism is illogical and 
ignorant. It has no place 
in this society." 



Saul Aguilar 
Senior 

"At California Lutheran University, 
all are welcome and respected. When acts 
of intolerance and racism have occurred at 
CLU, we have said, and will always say, 
'Not on our campus.' We mean this and 
will not tolerate or stand by when igno- 
rance and hate are expressed," said Dean 
of Students Bill Rosser. 

A series of robberies also occurred 
during the final three weeks of classes. 
Several laptops were stolen, along with 
other items from cars and dorm rooms. 

Three individuals were caught, includ- 
ing one student from CLU, and most of 
the stolen property was recovered. 

According to Peterson, the unidenti- 
fied student was arrested and charged with 
three counts of burglary. University policy 
does not allow names of student suspects 
to be released by Security. The remaining 
two suspects were taken into Thousand 
Oaks Police custody. At least one of the 
two was arrested. 

The vandalism was not related to the 
robberies. 




Photograph courtesy of Saul Aguilar 

Racist graffiti covers posters on the door of room 1209 in Potenberg 
Hall. 



North Campus construction to begin 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



Construction of the highly anticipated 
North Campus Athletics Complex is 
scheduled to commence in April. 

In December, California Lutheran 
University was granted permission by the 
Thousand Oaks Planning Commission to 
modify the campus. 

"If all goes well with the remainder 
of the permitting process, we plan on 
breaking ground in April," said Ryan Van 
Ommeren, director of Facilities. 

Building will begin with a new track 
and soccer field, which is scheduled to be 
finished in August 

Also in August work will begin on 
the Sports and Fitness Center and a new 
baseball field. The Sports and Fitness 
Center will be home to a dance studio, 
an Alumni Hall of Fame, classrooms and 
labs, fitness and weight training centers, 
offices and two gymnasiums. 



Construction of an aquatics center 
will begin in September. The center will 
house a 50-meter by 25-yard swimming 
pool. In addition, it will include chang- 
ing rooms, conference rooms, offices and 
restrooms. 

Building of phase one is scheduled 
to finish upon completion of the aquatics 
center in July 2005. 

Costs for the entire Now Is the Time 
campaign total $80 million. To date, Cal 
Lutheran has raised upward of $70 mil- 
lion. 

The first phase of construction, which 
includes the Sports and Fitness Center, 
aquatics center, soccer stadium and the 
George "Sparky" Anderson Baseball 
Field, will cost roughly $23 million. 

The Advancement Division, which 
is in charge of fund-raising for North 
Campus, has been successful in raising 
nearly $15 million. 

Susan McQuilkin, campaign man- 
ager, said that student support for the con- 



struction of the North Campus Athletics 
Complex has been remarkable. 

According to McQuilkin, Adam 
Jussel, who is chair of the Student Capital 
Campaign Committee and a "tremendous 
force"; Nicole Hackbarth, who is a gradu- 
ate of Cal Lutheran, an area residence 
coordinator, and coordinator of student 
programs; and Michael Fuller, who is 
associate dean of Students, have been 
instrumental in rounding up supporters. 

"I am excited about the addition of the 
North Campus. I am looking forward to 
the new aquatic facility, and having a pool 
on campus. I hope to be on the swim team 
next year, so it will help to have a pool so 
close and it will enable us to have some 
home meets instead of having to travel 
everywhere," said freshman Kari Uthus. 

Administrators anticipate that student 
participation in fitness, intramural and rec- 
reational activities will increase with the 
advent of the athletics complex. 

"[T]his is the experience of other 



institutions that have completed similar 
projects," Van Ommeren said. 

Students aren't the only people excit- 
ed about North Campus, however. Many 
coaches and professors are enthusiastic 
about the athletics complex. 

"They are very excited ... this proj- 
ect has been anticipated for years," Van 
Ommeren said. 

On its website, CLU asserts that 
"Athletic, educational and recreational 
facilities help CLU to fulfill its mission 
in developing tomorrow's leaders — lead- 
ers strong in character who are mentally, 
morally, and physically fit for the modem 
world." 

The North CampusAthleticsComplex 
will provide students with a place to learn 
and to stay physically fit. 

If students wish to make a donation 
to the Now Is The Time campaign, they 
may do so online at http://ww2.clunet.edu/ 
giving_to_clu/campaign/giving_ 
form.php. 



®«f ^fflH® 



The Echo 



Calendar 



February 4, 2004 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 





today 

february 4 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10a.m. 

French Club Meeting 

F-5 
6 p.m. 



Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 



The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

february 6 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Lutheran Leadership Event 

Chapel 
6 p.m. 

Regals Basketball vs. Calif. Institute of 
Technology 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 



Kingsmen Basketball vs. University of 
Redlands ---> 

°y m ». ,'.' 

7:30 p.m. I~. p. 



Sunday 

february 8 



* 



february 5 



Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Apartments Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 
9 p.m. 



Saturday 

february 7 



Leadership Institute 

Humanities Building 
10 a.m. 



Faculty Recital - Dorothy Shechter 

P/B Forum 
4 p.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

monday 

february 9 

Sexual Responsibility Week 

ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen I 
5:15 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen I 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 

tuesday 

february 10 



Sexual Responsibility Week 

ASCLU Executive Cabinet Elections 

SUB • 
9 a.m. 

Brown Bag Series 
WRC 

12 p.m. 

Regal 's Basketball vs. Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps Colleges 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 



FOX Sports w/Jimmy Fox: ClU-TV, Channel 1 6, Wednesdays © 10:30 p.m. 

This week's guest: Alex Mallen & Julie Clchon from the Regals Baskeball Team 



03 



Tutors Needed: S15-S18/hr. to slarl. Teach one-on-one, in- 
home SAT 1 Math and/or Verbal & Academic subjects in youi 
area of expertise. Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable trans 
req Mail. fax. or email cover letter and resume. Include stan- 
dardized tesl scores (SAT l/II. GRE. etc.) 

If inlerested. mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310) 282-6424 
or email resume to: instructorhiring6@aceeducation.co 



Helper Needed: To help mother with 2 children & light 
housekeeping. 3 days/wk, flexible schedule, 
if interested, contact Gina at: 
(805) 536-1675 



Classified ads can 
be placed on the 
Calendar page for a 
flat rate regardless of 
word count. Discount 
available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are 
subject to editing for 
content & clarity. 

Call: 
(805) 493-3865 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 

Summer Day Camps seek Gen- 
eral Counselors & Specialist In- 
structors. Located just 20 min. 
from CLU, staff can earn S2800 
- $3500+ for the summer work 
ing with children outdoors! 

Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



French Club LACMA Excursion 



LACMA ERTE/OPERA & BALLETS RUSSES/DANCE 

EXHIBITION CELEBRATES CREATIVE EXPLOSION IN 

EARLY 20TH-CENTURY TH""™ 15 

Exhibition presents extremely rare costumes with many accomijaiiyiiiy ui& 
well as costumes by artists Henri Matisse. 
Sonia Delaunay and others 

Join us Sunday. Feb. 22^*°- 



to see this acclaimed exhibition 
We will meet on campus at 11 am 

(carpooling $5 w/ clu id) 
Contact Rachel for more info: 
428-3789 rhelfan@clunet.edu 



Discover Your Career 
Options 

Thursday. Fe bruary 12. 2004 
at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

Not sure what you want to do 
with your life? Trying to choose 
a major or emphasis area? This 
workshop will assist you with 
gathering information on your- 
self and career opportunities 
so you can start building your 
resume in the right direction. 



FREE 

SUPPORT GROUP 



for Eating Disorder 
Recoverers 

Every Thursday, 6 to 7:30 
p.m. 
in the F-Building (second build- 
ing behind the tennis courts) 

Sponsored by the CLU 
Counseling Center and 
Marriage, Family Child 
Center, in conjunc- 

tion with the National 
Association of Anorexia 



Nervosa 
Disorders 



and 



Associated 
(ANAD). 



: or more information, please feel free to call 

or email me or log onto 

http://www.altrue.net/site/anadweb/ 

ANAD - National Association of Anorexia 

Nervosa and Associated Disorders 

Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW 
Ext: 3390 ccolleWSclunet.edll 



Where are YOU going? 




Come find ouf more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-? 
x3750 

sfudyabroad@clunef.edu 
Open Mon - Fri., 17. -30-7. -20 



No Appointment N«*ci lary! 

CLU llud*nt lupport lervkel 

OucrtUmTT (SOS) «•!•»» 



to 



t c ° FUI out *#»« f=AFSA 
wit* «*• *•*> 0/ SSS* 

IIS FAFIA Worbihop. beflln Friday, January »th 1004 and 

continue *v*ry Monday A Friday In February. 
All worbihop. arc from tOiOOam-tl.OOam In Library Urn. T 



1 



Don't wait until the March 2nd deadline' 

The eariier you fill out your FAF5A. the better chance you have at receiving 

at much money a\ you con for financial aid. 



What you will 
A FAFSA PIN (Personal Id 
e betore thv workshop a! r 



BSU: BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 

Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, 
AND FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME ! 

For more information, call: 
Juan it a Pryor Hall 
(SOS) 493-3951 
(BSU Adviser) 



mMEMMH!IMEBMI3MEM 



February 4, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



ASCLU to disband RHA 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



In their recent meeting, ASCLU-G made 
some changes to the school's constitution 
regarding student government. It was decided 
that the Residence Hall Association should 
be eliminated. Several changes were also 
enacted in the way future elections will be run. 
Changes were also made to current govern- 
ment positions. 

Last semester. RHA debated on whether 
or not it was serving its intended purpose on 
campus. RHA's functions are similar to that of 
both Senate and Programs Board, but focuses 
directly on residence halls. Between Senate, 
PB, and the resident assistants, much of what 
RHA does is redundant. 

The board decided, with a vote of 22-4, 
that ASCLU could do without RHA. Next, 
they decided where RHA's 6 percent of 
student fees would go; who would take on 
the programs it handled, such as Alcohol 
Awareness Week, Sexual Responsibility Week 
and care packages; and how to rewrite some of 
ASCLU-G's by-laws. 

The committee consisted of the three 
board directors, the ASCLU president, and 
two members from each board. Michael 



Fuller, associate dean of students and ASCLU 
adviser, and Angela Naginey, director of 
Residence Life and adviser to RHA, oversaw 
the committee. 

"1 think the ASCLU-G seriously took 
into consideration what they felt would be in 
the best interest of the student body," Fuller 
said. 

The committee first deleted everything 
having to do with RHA from the constitution, 
followed by the delegation of the funds that 
belonged to RHA. 

The committee decided that the 6 percent 
of student fees allocated to RHA would be 
divided up, giving Student Programs 3 per- 
cent. Senate 2 percent, and PB I percent. 

The final task was to update and amend 
outdated parts of the existing constitution. 
Minor grammatical changes were made, as 
well as updating current organization names, 
such as Multicultural Services to Multicultural 
Programs. 

The committee also decided to remove all 
at large positions from Senate and PB. In their 
place, each class will have four representatives 
instead of three. 

Additionally, students will no longer 
vote for only their class, but for each posi- 
tion on every board, because all senators and 



"I think ASCLU seriously 
took into consideration 
what they felt would be 
in the best interest of the 
student body." 

Michael Fuller 
ASCLU adviser 

programmers represent the student body in 
its entirety and shouid be elected as such. The 
reasoning behind not changing all of the posi- 
tions to at large positions was to keep an equal 
representation of each class on each board. 

Other changes included eliminating the 
dance and social activities coordinator from 
PB, adding a second appointed marketing 
position to PB, and making the ASCLU con- 
troller an appointed position. 

The new constitution was voted on by all 
three existing boards of government. The bill 
passed in each board meeting on Jan. 26. The 
vote then went to the entire student body. On 
Jan. 28, 258 students voted on the amendment. 
It passed with 92 percent of the vote. 

RHA will finish the semester with its 
intended hall programs of Club Lu, Sexual 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Senate members Robert BoUmd and Jason 
Soyster take notes during the meeting. 

Responsibility Week and Siblings Weekend. 
The board will disband April 30. Amendments 
to the constitution will go into effect at that 
time. 



CLU participates in library workshop 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University will take 
part in the Transformation of the College 
Library national workshop in Minneapolis 
this summer in hopes of addressing critical 
issues in information literacy and the dramatic 
changes occurring in college libraries. 

Organized by the Council of Independent 
Colleges and in cooperation with the Council 
of Library and Information Resources, Dr. 
Pamela Jolicoeur, provost and dean of fac- 
ulty; Julius Bianchi, associate provost for 
Information Services; and Dr. Leanne Neilson, 
associate professor of psychology and chair of 
faculty have been invited to attend the three- 
day workshop beginning June 3. 

"Enhancing the CLU library is a key 
component of the academic plan," Jolicoeur 
said. "Great universities are known, in part, for 
the quality of their libraries; it is important that 
the university grow in all areas of information 
literacy." 

This workshop will offer information 
and develop protocol to aid CLU to "build 



something fresh, contemporary and that serves 
the needs of students in an information-intense 
environment," Jolicoeur said. 

"Great universities are 
known, in part, for the 
quality of their libraries." 



Dr. Pamela Jolicoeur 
Provost and Dean of Faculty 



Selected to represent a cross-section 
of administrators, faculty and Information 
Systems Services, the team will learn about 
relevant issues facing Pearson Library such as 
advancing information literacy as an element 
of liberal education, the role of the library in 
teaching and learning through collaboration 
and the changing use and conception of the 
physical space of the library, to name just to 
name a few, according to the CIC website. 

"We first began looking deeply at infor- 



mation literacy issues as part of the Western 
Association for Schools and Colleges accredi- 
tatipn review," Neilson said. Part of the review 
process is to set goals for the university, and 
"improved information literacy skills is one of 
our goals," she said. 

Discrepancy/gap analysis research con- 
ducted by Julius Bianchi and ISS also revealed 
that the library and its resources "have less of 
everything across the board as compared to 
other institutions of our size." Bianchi said. 

Although CLU's academic programs 
reflect its commitment to academic devel- 
opment and an ongoing effort to improve 
information literacy, offering a wide range of 
masters-level programs as well as the new 
doctoral program in education. 

"The library and its resources still fall 
short in support of these programs," Bianchi 
said. 

As one of the smallest libraries among 
our peer institutions, "there is much room for 
improvement," Bianchi said. 

He specified the areas of improvement 
are collection size, collection relevancy, the 
number of books circulated, inter-library 
loans, the number of computers available. 



print resources and in the physical comfort 
and layout of the library. 

"I am excited to attend [the workshop] 
and to work as a team in a collaborative effort 
to incorporate information technology into all 
areas of academics at CLU," Neilson said. 

By the end of the workshop, Bianchi 
expects that the team will have developed 
goals for the library collections, information 
literacy and facility planning. Bianchi also 
maintains that involving key stakeholders in 
library planning will allow the team to return 
to campus with a more unified and thorough 
vision for the library. 

"The library for the 2 1 st century is a much 
more dynamic entity than just a facility with 
books and periodicals. It is a service center 
that provides access to electronic collections 
and physical holdings from other libraries and 
assistance to students and faculty on how to 
locate and use resources," Jolicoeur said. 

For more information, students may con- 
tact the CIC via their website, www.cic.edu, 
or contact Julius Bianchi in the Office of 
Information Systems and Services at ext. 
3483. 



Senate sets goals for the new semester 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Senate has come back from a month- 
long hiatus to discuss such issues as light- 
ing on campus, two new study areas in 
the Thompson and Pedersen lounges and 
benches at the cross during last week's 
meeting. 

The main issue of the night was the 
newly revised ASCLU constitution. The 
constitutional changes were due to the 
decision made a few months earlier by 
ASCLU-G to eliminate the Residence Hall 
Association from ASCLU. As a result four 
new positions were added to Senate and 
five to Programs Board. Another change 
being voted on was the elimination of 
all at large positions in both Senate and 
Programs Board, as well as the Dance and 



Social Activities Coordinator position from 
Programs Board. 

The discussion took up most of the 
meeting as some Senate members were 
apprehensive about allowing the student 
body to be able to vote on all ASCLU-G 
positions and not just for their class as it 
had been previously. Junior Senator Jared 
I. Perry moved to amend the bill, but the 
motion failed. 

"Voters have a hard enough time vot- 
ing for just their class; now they have to 
vote for 16 people in Senate and 16 for 
Programs Board," said sophomore Senator 
Marissa Tsaniff regarding the constitutional 
changes. 

After much discussion, the constitution- 
al changes were approved with 14 in favor, 
zero opposed and two abstentions. 

Senate also voted on the constitutional 



"As a whole, I want stu- 
dents to be aware of 
changes we are making 
on campus, like the new 
computers in the SUB." 

Jared I. Perry 
junior Senator 

bylaws change which would increase sti- 
pends for the ASCLU president, ASCLU 
Senate director and ASCLU Programs 
Board director. It would also amend posi- 
tion descriptions so that they would cor- 
rectly reflect ASCLU and the elimination of 
RHA. The bill passed with 15 in favor, zero 
opposed and one abstention. 

Senate Director Jason Soyster stressed 



the importance of each committee complet- 
ing at least one project this semester and 
making it known that Senate was working 
on other campus projects. 

"As a whole, I want students to be 
aware of changes we are making on cam- 
pus, like the new computers in the SUB." 
Perry said. 

The Indoor Structural Committee head- 
ed by at large Representative Carly Coker is 
working on having a study lounge built in 
both Thompson and Pedersen. 

Senior Senator Rachel Eskesen stated 
that as part of the Academics Committee, 
"We"re working toward a brighter library." 

Junior Senator Kellie Kocher stated 
that the Campus Life Committee was work- 
ing on a joint resolution with the Outdoor 
Structural Committee about the lighting on 
campus. 



Glare lidMos 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



February 4, 2004 



What are you looking forward to this semester? 




^ 




Joey Cusick, business. 2005 



Joey Stein, sports medicine, 2007 



Samantha Allen, psychology, 2005 



"Getting to meet everyone for the first "Getting to know all of the new ladies on "Parties and fine guys.' 

time and getting accustomed to the CLU way campus." 
of life." 




I 



Jenny Young, communication, 2004 
"The fact that it's my last." 




(jnliiA 



J£& 



1 



ill 




[~ ■£ 



1 



J 




Alex Williams, sports medicine, 2005 Alex Gonzales, communication, 2005 Scott Barwick, marketing communication, Brendan Kinion, drama, 2004 

2005 



"Concentratin' on my grades.' 



"Working for 'Fox Sports' on CLU-TV." "Wrestling in the annual California 

"Wearing my apron in the bookstore." Lutheran Wrestling show." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography by Marybel Lopez 



Retail 



Half.com 




priCB 



76/*50 




Average 

pttC* 



*43/*22 



For a Hmttad tfma, 6f»t-tim* buyw* 

Save an additional *5 

on purchases of *50 or mora.' 

Simply use this code; 

CLU2004 



Natural selection. 

How smart is this: All the textbooks you 
need for up to 50% off retail prices. New or 
used, all you have to do is go to half.com 
and type in the book titles, or ISBN numbers. 
Then let nature take its course. 



I. com" 

Same textbooks. 
Smarter prices. 



Copyright I00J 2004 Half com Half com. tha Hatf com logo. aBay »r*i trmd*, ta v ° •>• ui<um»-u of alaymc All nghtaraaarvad >rtn^ Rat*) ftioa of ■ NawTaaihoc* baaad on data from FoBan Corp [ai raportad byTha AaaooMad Fran in January »"l * 
RatailPncaof a UaadTaalbook baaad ondau from Montvnant Informafrori Haaouicai Avaraga HaHeom fnoa tor Maw and UaadTaalbooka baaad on an AuguaVSaptambar joOJ anafyara ol ovar S 00 BOO book* aold on HaM.com Ouarartaia. prc«g and availabdil, 
guatantaad and will vary dua to auppf* and damand Coupon >■ tor firai-uma buyora onh/ Umitad lima oMar. aadudai ahipping and handing, oflai aubukcl to changa or larmtnatnn without pne* nolka 



®3H5S ^OH® 



February 4, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



Design Journal Show encourages creativity 




By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Stephanie Shaker 

Sophomore Matthew Kugler exam- 
ines a design journal. 



"What if penguins took over the 
world" is just one of the perplexing pieces 
featured now in the Design Journal Show 
in the Kwan Fong Gallery by California 
Lutheran University's multimedia depart- 
ment. 

"I think it's interesting and kind of 
weird, and I'm still trying to figure it out," 
junior Carrie Missall said. "It's all so ran- 
dom." 

The randomness she's talking about 
can surely be found at the exhibit including 
Nana Yaw's "Monkey Pie Recipe," which, 
if inquiring, "[is] best served with a chilled 
glass of monkey blood." 

The displays are creative entries 
from 26 multimedia students' daily design 
journals from the previous semester. As 
an ongoing assignment, students were 



"Some of the people 
have some real artistic 
talent... I think it's a great 
idea they're putting up 
student's work." 

Keith Bartlett 
Freshman 

required to keep a journal ot their lite. The 
objective was to overcome the blank page 
and fill it with words and images that 
express their view on life. Each page 
expresses emotions of happiness, sadness, 
frustration, inspiration or whatever con- 
fronted them that day. 

"Some of the people have some real 
artistic talent, like Curtis Harlow," said 
freshman Keith Bartlett. "1 think it's a great 
idea they're putting up students' work." 



Other work features sketches of 
comic book characters by Brandon Hill, 
which are part of his comic book "Arsenel." 
He's been working on it for almost a year 
and hopes to launch soon with his best 
friend. His doodle on a page sparked a 
comic book franchise, and for some of 
his other classmates, it led to an idea for a 
new television miniseries, a documentary 
on endangered species and lit the fire for 
future animation, music and design. 

The design journal show is featured 
in the Soiland Humanities Center until 
Saturday, Feb. 7. 

Professor of multimedia Daniel 
Restuccio's purpose for displaying the 
work is to encourage others to "leap off 
the thousand foot pole and start your own 
journal," according to Restuccio's show 
introduction. "The inspiration you feel 
here is a delightful invitation to begin that 
exciting journey." 



Bandits Bar and Grill caters to meat lovers 



By Kristina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



Venture in to Bandits Bar and Grill in 
Thousand Oaks on almost any night, and you 
will be sure to find the restaurant abuzz with 
families, couples and friends. The small family 
eatery, which opened in 1990, is well known 
around Ventura County for its Texas-style 
barbecue dishes. 

No reservations are allowed in this res- 



taurant, and after arriving it is obvious why. 
The dining area is only slightly larger than a 
California Lutheran University Humanities 
building classroom. This aspect actually 
works for Bandits by making the atmosphere 
cozy and inviting. Even though the square 
room looked filled, we were seated quickly 
at one of the dark wood tables. The service 
throughout the night was decent, but not any- 
thing extraordinary. 

If what you're looking for is meat, this is 
a good spot for it. From chicken, to tri-tip, to 



ribs, all the meat is barbecued over a slow oak 
fire. There are also four different seasonings 
available with the meat: the original house 
barbecue for the traditional eaters, sweet and 
tangy teriyaki, a spicy mix of onions and pep- 
pers called jerk or the plain seasoning of salt, 
pepper and garlic. 

If anything on the menu could be 
improved, it would be the side dishes. For the 
dinner platters, the side dishes available are 
fries, a baked potato, ranch beans or com on 



beans were too tangy. Even so, the meat is very 
tasty as the main dish. 

In terms of prices. Bandits is reasonable. 
You can get a lot of food for under $15, The 
portions are large, and most customers leave 
with a doggie bag. If for some reason a veg- 
etarian were to choose Bandits for a meal, 
there are salads and Garden Burgers available 
on the menu also. 

Along with the normal beverages. Bandits 
also offers bottled sodas to go along with the 



CD 'Let's get rid of L.A. ' 
essential for punk lovers 



the cob. The potatoes were dry and the ranch "old-time" feel of the restaurant. 

Campus political clubs 
plan events, speakers 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



Reminiscent of a time when Rodney 
on the Roq broke new ground and Penelope 
Spheer badgered a very inebriated Exene 
Cervenka with trivial questions, "Let's Get 
Rid of L.A." is an essential compilation for 
anyone interested in the underground L.A. 
music scene. Collecting an eclectic array of 
styles, the record covers the art-punk tenden- 
cies of Thee Make Out Party, the Josie Cotton- 
inspired new wave pop of The Pinkz and the 
roots-punk sound of the Starvations and The 
Alleged Gunmen. While all of the bands 
represented are as unique as the members in 
them, they all have that warm, accessible lo-fi 
sound so commonly associated with music of 
relevance. Simply put this composition is for 
anyone in need of a fresh reminder of what the 
L.A. music scene still has to offer. 

Openers The Rolling Blackouts bring their 
artsy-garage punk assault with "Champagne 
and Painkillers." Neon King Kong takes a 
page from the Morris/Ginn Black Flag era 
songwriting book and proves that juvenile 
delinquent beach rats are still present and 
accounted for. The Orphans bring pure punk 
fury with "Miss Easy Rider." With the excep- 
tion of the lackluster "Minute" by Radio Vago, 
"Let's Get Rid of L.A." is virtually dud free. 
That said, the two-standout tracks belong to 
The Starvations and the Alleged Gunmen. The 
latter's "New Bo Diddley" is an utterly fantas- 



tic apocalyptic tale, sang over the music of a 
Teddy boy dancehall. Continuing in his Shane 
MacGowan-inspired narratives, Gabriel Hart 
of the Starvations has nothing but contempt 
for bourgeois West Los Angeles. 

In the liner notes of "Let's Get Rid of 
L.A.", Todd Taylor vies for the erasure of 
L.A.'s punk past (a bit ironic, considering the 
name of this composition was taken from a 
Random song). With a past roster of X, The 
Gun Club, Catholic Discipline, The Go Go's 
and Black Flag, Taylor might be asking for too 
much. Nevertheless, his thesis is a completely 
valid (and understandable) one. The very rich- 
ness and romanticizing of L.A.'s punk past 
has seemingly weighed down any expecta- 
tion of reaching a golden pinnacle L.A. once 
achieved. 

However, this feeling of complete dispos- 
session is understandable, as there hasn't been 
much to offer the kids of L.A., especially in 
comparison to its original 1977 punk burst. 
Consequently, this marginal perspective only 
strengthens Taylor's thesis, considering the 
rot of L.A.'s stagnant music scene could be 
so easily inhaled by anyone just prior to that 
now mythical blast of the late '70s. Will the 
bands on "Let's Get Rid of L.A." move L.A.'s 
preconceived immovable bar up a notch? Only 
time or another composition begging for the 
dismissal of "Let's Get Rid of L.A." will tell. 
Regardless, it has certainly (and more impor- 
tantly) reinstalled my faith in L.A.'s current 
scene. 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 



The six clubs on the California 
Lutheran University campus that have 
been officially identified as political clubs 
are planning events catered to the 2004 
election year and getting students prepared 
to vote. The main focus and club politics 
of these organizations are to inform and 
involve the student population as much 
as possible. 

"Just get involved whether you are 
part of the Democratic Party, Republican 
Party, or Green Party; it all makes a 
world of difference," said President Brian 
Roberts of the Republican Club. 

With the upcoming elections for the 
presidency in November, CLU students 
should prepare for debates and speak- 
ers. The Democrat Club and Republican 
Club have planned a debate between Saul 



Aguilar. Democrat Club president and 
Brian Roberts, Republican Club president. 
The debate is scheduled to take place in 
early February. 

The Republican Club also has plans 
for a keynote speaker late in the spring 
semester. 

"I am not very politically involved, 
but I try to stay informed about national 
and school politics as much as I can, and 
it's cool that there is a Democratic Club so 
that I can reference them for information," 
freshman Amelia Bell said. 

This completes the goal of all the 
political clubs on the CLU campus. The 
Democratic and Republican Clubs have 
seen a significant increase of students 
becoming involved in the political clubs 
on campus from last year's projections. 

Other political clubs that are planning 
events are the Programs Board for student 
involvement and the Senior Committee. 



Visit the Echo online at 
www.clunet.edu/echo 



Don't forget the Leadership Institute 

on Feb. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 

the Soiland Humanities Center 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn S2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamn.com 



fBjfg ^(S3H(B 



The Echo 



OPINION 



February 4, 2004 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 



CBS picks beer over politics 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



CBS refused to air two commercials during 
Super Bowl XXXVIII, claiming that they did not 
accept or air advocacy commercials. However, 
the network did air a "wardrobe malfunction" 
that displayed Janet Jackson's exposed breast 
and pierced nipple to millions of viewers during a 
live halftime show produced by MTV. Both CBS 
and MTV later apologized for the incident, but 
all apologies aside, this is a colossal disservice 
to the American people. The display of Jackson's 
nipple was almost certainly a violation of Federal 
Communications Commission rules prohibiting 
indecent material from being broadcast between 
6 a.m. and 10 p.m. And while it is important 



for CBS to comply with FCC regulations, I am 
much more concerned with the network's failure 
to air advocacy commercials. 

CBS has been granted a broadcasting license 
by the FCC and as a result of this, is charged with 
serving the public interest. Last week's broadcast 
of the Super Bowl raises questions about whose 
interest CBS is really serving. Apparently CBS 
believed that airing a series of Bud Light com- 
mercials encouraging millions of Americans 
to dnnk beer belter served the public than two 
advocacy commercials designed to promote 
discussion about issues of public importance. 
MoveOn.org recently raised S4.5 million to air 
the winner of its anti-Bush ad contest during the 
Super Bowl, CBS wouldn't take a dime of their 
money. CBS spokesperson Dana McClintock 
said that CBS has a long-standing policy of 
prohibiting advocacy advertisements. With tins 
same reasoning, CBS refused to sell ad time to 
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. 
Contrary to the network's long-standing prohi- 
bition of advocacy ads, CBS did air two other 
non-commercial, "issue," advertisements. One 
discourages drug use and encourages parents to 
be more aware of their children's activities, The 
second humorously portrays what would happen 
if other companies sold harmful products like 



cigarettes. Both of these commercials seem to 
advocate specific positions on issues of public 
importance, yet CBS deemed them fit to air 

Even conservative Fox News pundit Bill 
O'Reilly publicly staled that he did not under- 
stand why CBS refused to air the MoveOn.org 
ad, which depicts young children performing 
menial jobs and asks, "Guess who's going to pay 
off President Bush's $1 trillion deficit?" 

Certainly the MoveOn.org ad is less offen- 
sive and controversial than the Bud Light ad in 
which a woman's face is brutally scorched when 
she accidentally ignites a horse's flatulence. 

CBS swallowed government-sponsored, 
anti-drug ads whole, even though drug abuse is 
certainly a controversial issue. However, when a 
group of citizens try lo a run a commercial aimed 
at promoting positive discussion about the future 
debt of America, CBS chokes. The citizens of 
this country have entrusted their airwaves to 
CBS, only to be denied access to them. In this 
age of highly concentrated media ownership, 1 
believe the FCC should require all broadcast 
networks lo reserve one minute of every broad- 
cast hour for paid advocacy commercials. This 
would diversify public opinion and guaranlee 
access to all. 



TV dumbing down America 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



First, it was newlywed Jessica Simpson with 
her infamous Chicken of the Sea, "Is this chicken 
or is it tuna?" comment. Next, MTV recruited 
daughter of famous fashion designer Tommy 
Hilfiger to star in yet another reality series "Rich 
Girls," which follows Hilfiger's daughter Ally 
and best friend Jamie Gleicher. (Who can forget 
Gleicher's statement that Benjamin Franklin 
invented the light bulb?) 

Next, Fox retaliated by coming up with 
quite possibly the most ridiculous, yet genius, 
concept for a reality show to dale. In "The Simple 
Life," multimillion-dollar heiresses Paris Hilton, 
heir to a $36 million hotel empire, and her best 
friend Nicole Richie, daughter of singer Lionel 
Richie, are plucked out of their Beverly Hills 
homes and planted right smack in the middle of 
rural America to see if they can actually fend for 
themselves - no credit cards, no cell phones, no 
safety net - for 30 days. Needless to say, the two 
socialites turned the small town of Alius, Ark., 
upside down. 

The show was an instant smash, drawing in 
over 13 million viewers with the debut episode, 
catapulting Hilton and Richie into reality super- 
stardom. Fox has already started production on 
a second season, set to air in May, just in time 
for those crucial network sweeps. Although the 
locale has yet lo be determined, Fox entertain- 



ment chief Gail Berman said it's likely that the 
girls will travel "oulsidc our borders" for a sec- 
ond go-around. 

On Jan. 2 1 , MTV launched the second sea- 
son of "Newlyweds," tracking Simpson and Nick 
Lachey through their second year of marriage 
and quite possibly some more rare Simpson-isms 
we have come to know and laugh at. 

So why is America so captivated with 
these reality shows that seem to cater to the 
lowest common denominator? Is it that we feel 
somewhat smarter when we see Hilton ask, 
"What is Wal-mart? Is that where they like sell 
wall stuff?"; or do we feel less inferior when we 
hear Simpson say she doesn't eat buffalo wings 
because she doesn't like buffalo? 

Perhaps. Maybe we put these celebrities on 
such a high pedestal that we are eagerly waiting 
for a chance to see these beautiful, rich, seem- 
ingly "perfect" individuals fall on their face, and 
at times, even fling themselves off of their pedes- 
tal with those dim-witted comments. 

While it is hard so say exactly why we 
cater to such unrealistic "reality" programming, 
the fact is, we do. With shows like "American 
Idol" and "The Apprentice" drawing in viewers 
by the millions, reality TV has taken the top spot 
during primetime. Even with new reality shows 
coming out practically every other week, we 
can't seem to get enough of it. "Survivor", one of 
the original reality shows, has already started it's 
special All-Star edition, pitting 16 former contes- 



tants against each other m the ultimate game of 
"Outwit. Outlast. Outplay" 

Do we really watch these shows because of 
the "reality" factor? Hardly. After all. it has been 
speculated that many of the realily shows are, 
in fact, somewhat scripted. But maybe it is the 
"larger than life" aspect to reality TV that draws 
us in. If these shows are to be a reflection of what 
really happens in the real world, then maybe we 
like to fool ourselves into thinking that the love of 
our life will drive up in a black stretch limousine, 
a la, "The Bachelor"; or that an "Average Joe" 
can win the heart of a gorgeous beauty queen. 

In a time of terror alerts and scandal, real- 
ity TV provides a more plausible escape than 
sitcoms or other scripted programming. Even 
though certain premises may be set up, there is 
still a sense of unpredictability when it comes to 
these shows. After all, these still are real people 
who are put in surreal situations. They are more 
relatable to the public than uber-celebriues like 
Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman, who are far 
more glamorized and idolized for being superior 
human beings. 

Although I doubt that shows like 'The 
Simple Life" and "Newlyweds" will have a shelf 
life longer than three or four seasons, you can be 
certain that the producers of these shows will 
milk them for everything they're worth - and 
continue feeding us with more of this curious 
guilty pleasure. 



gggg ffiqp® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

' RoyEhrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo ate inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327: E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



(EiPi Tzmam 



February 4, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Kingsmen basketball in 1st place 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The CLU men's basketball team (14-3, 
5-1) had a victorious week in sports, tearing 
down a tie between four teams to only two and 
then taking the top spot in the SCIAC. 

Tile Kingsmen's winning tiebreaker 
against Pomona-Pitzer, now with a record 
of 1 1-6, 4-2, was played in front of a packed 
house on Saturday, Jan. 31. The two teams 
were neck and neck throughout the game, but 
the Kingsmen were able to pull off the win 
against Sagehens, beating them 62-60. 

Senior Zareh Avedian had 17 points for 
the team, along with four assists, three blocks, 
and a team high of six rebounds. Junior Ron 
Russ also added 14 points to the scoreboard. 
Junior Matt Adame and senior Ryan Hodges 
both scored 1 1 points for the team. 

Many students also came out to support 
the team on Wenesday, Jan. 28, when the 
Kingsmen played the Claremont Stags (8-9, 
4-2). After a hard fight, the Kingsmen were 
triumphant, defeating the Stags, 72-69. 

The coaches are proud of the way the 
boys played against the Stags. 

"We fought very hard against Claremont, 



we got good scoring from our leaders. Avedian 
and Hodges, and excellent leadership from 
Adame." Head Coach Rich Rider said. 

Avedian led the team in scoring against 

"We just hope to stay 
consistent for the rest of 
the season, so we can 
win this thing." 

Etienne Emanuel 
Senior 

Claremont with 25 points and nine rebounds. 
Hodges and Russ were not far behind, scoring 
1 5 points apiece. Hodges also had six boards 
and five assists and Adame scored six points 
for the team. 

This was an important win for the 
Kingsmen as it secured their place in the con- 
ference. This win is what made the match-up 
between CLU and Pomona-Pitzer so crucial. 

"The team played very well (against 
Claremont). Everyone gave one hundred percent Photograph by Todd Kugler 

and made some great plays. We just hope to stay Junior Malt Adame focuses on ihe ball and his opponent while playing defense against 
consistent for the rest of the season, so we can the Claremont Stags on Wednesday. Jan. 28. 2004. 
win this thing," said senior Etienne Emanuel. 




Midseason struggle 
for Regals basketball 




Come out to CLU's first rugby 

game at the stadium. 

Saturday, Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. 



You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 




Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
Senior Julie Cichon charges past the La Verne defender at the top of the key in attempts 
tofnd an open shot. 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's basketball game on Friday, Jan. 30, 
turned into a nailbiter as the Regals (6-10, 3-3) 
went into double overtime with Pomona-Pitzer 
(7-10,4-2). 

The Regals let their 12-point lead dwindle 
in the last 15 minutes of the game, resulting in 
a 62-62 tie that sent them to their first overtime. 
Both teams then scored nine points, which put 
them into their second OT Pomona's Alana 
Casner's 10 free throws helped keep the 
Regals at arms length, but CLU fell short of 
the win, 89-81. 

Julie Cichon led the team with 1 7 points, 
three blocks and three steals. Alex Mallen had 
16 points, seven rebounds, 12 assists. Katy 
Svennungsen led the team with 12 boards. 

The Regals took on SCIAC leader La 



Veme, now 12-5, 5-1, on Tuesday, Jan. 27. 
The student body came out to cheer on the 
Regals. but despite their effort the Regals lost 
to La Veme, 70-77. The Regals briefly made 
a comeback, getting within three points of the 
Leopards, but that was as close as they got. 

Alex Mallen scored 17 points and had 
six assists, Lauren Stroot had a double double, 
scoring 17 points and having 10 rebounds, 
and Julie Cichon scored 15 points and had 
seven rebounds. Katy Svennungsen had 12 
rebounds, seven of which were offensive. 

The team knows what they have to do in 
order to beat the Leopards next time. 

"1 see a huge game at their place (on Feb. 
20). We just need to make a few adjustments. 
We can definitely take that game," said Head 
Coach Kristy Hopkins. 

The Regals have two home games this 
week, Thursday at 7 p.m. against UC Santa 
Cruz and Friday at 7:30 p.m. against Cal Tech. 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ B.A. I iberal Studies for paraedui ators 

■ M. I d. teacher Preparation 

■ MS. Special I dilation 

■ M. A. ( urricultiiri & Instrui don 

■ M.A.I durational Administration 

■ M.s. ( lounseling and ( luid m c 

■ Pupil Personnel Services 

■ College Studenl Personnel 

■ I d.l >. I durational I eldership 

You are invited 



5 




Grad 



miCT»nn 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



( .',i/7 1, <v mori information 
■ md n H'wcitions an >< ji 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angeles 
clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/Graduate 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



February 4, 2004 



Alumni relive glory days at CLU 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Some of California Lutheran University's 
alumni baseball players reunited to play 
against each other and the university's current 
baseball team Saturday. Jan. 31, 2004. The 
alumni vs. alumni game ended 7-4 and the 
current baseball team beat the alumni in the 
second game, 11-1. 

"It was a good turnout for the alumni 
game, and it was a good tuneup for Cal Lu's 
season opener this weekend in Palo Alto, 
Calif.," Coach Marty Slimak said. "A lot of 
the alumni from the early '90s, the '70s, 2001, 
2002 and 2003 came out and supported us." 

Slimak said that Jason Hirsh, Jim 
Harrison and Taylor Slimak, who came back 
for Saturday's game, still play professional 
baseball. 

Rick Haynes said he never thought 
he would return to CLU and play baseball. 
He played baseball for California Lutheran 
College, and Saturday marked his third 
alumni game. He now plays in the National 
Adult Baseball Association, which is for 40- 
year-olds and over. 

"It's a fantastic feeling to come back here 
and play baseball," said Haynes. 

Haynes found out about the alumni game 
three years ago when he was searching the 
Internet and saw a pop-up for CLU baseball's 
Club '99 and the team's Web page. He sent an 
e-mail to Slimak. introducing himself, saying 
what year he played and that he would like to 
join Club '99. 

"Some divine power was behind me 
being here now." Haynes said. "I stood out 
in center field and cried like a baby. It's 
something special for me to be here. Marty 
and Donna [Slimak] are two special people 
in my life." 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
One of California Lutheran University's current baseball players dives into second base in an attempt to avoid being tagged out by a 
CLU alumnus at the game on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2004. 



Haynes said that his fondest memories at 
CLU were beating UCLA and the camaraderie 
with those whom he was associated with on 
the baseball team. He also said that nobody 
"won" the first game: rather, one team scored 
more than the other. 

"The alumni team I was on got hot and 
hit a couple of home runs," Haynes said. "We 
came from behind to score more than the 
other team. It was just a bunch of guys getting 
together and playing a game they love." 

Marco Marquez pitched for CLU in 1 997 
and said that he still plays baseball. He said 
that the first game was good and that meet- 
ing a bunch of good friends on the team is his 
fondest memory at CLU. 

"It was good to listen to all the stories, 
reminisce and talk about the playing years," 



Marquez said. 

"It was nice just to see all the old 
guys," said Steve Fjeldseth, who graduated 
in 1998 with a degree in business marketing 
and pitched for CLU for four years. 

Saturday marked Fjeldseth's fifth 
alumni baseball game. Fjeldseth also said 
that the camaraderie is his fondest memory 
of CLU. 

The alumni game gave sophomore 
Matthew Hirsh and seniors Mike Kaczowka 
and Ed Edsall a chance to see former team- 
mates. 

"It was a good warm-up for the upcom- 
ing season," said Hirsh, who pitched against 
his brother. "It was good to pitch against 
people I used to play [with]." 

"It was fun, and it was good playing 



"I stood out in center 
field and cried like a 
baby. It's something 
special for me to be 
here." 



Rick Haynes 

CLU Alumnus 



[against] ail of them," Edsall said. "I played 
with some of them as a freshman and a sopho- 
more." 

"It was pretty good," Kaczowka said 
of playing some of CLU's alumni. "Ed 
[Edsall] and I hadn't seen some of those 
guys in three years." 




Men's tennis needs 
more preparation 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
men's-tennis team (0- 1 ), one of the high- 
er nationally ranked teams on campus, 
began the season away with a 0-7 loss 
against the NCAA Division I opponent, 
Cal Poly Mustangs (5-2), on Sunday, 
Feb. I, in San Luis Obispo. 

With the addition of three new play- 
ers to the starting roster this year, the 
team seemed to be up to caliber with the 
Division I team, but the results showed 
differently. 

The Kingsmen lost all singles 
matches and were swept in all three 
doubles matches. 

"I just feel that this was our first 
match this year and I think that we 
weren't really mentally prepared for this 
situation, but I know that when we get 
back in the roll of things we will be able 
to compete against a strong team such 
as Cal Poly San Luis Obispo," junior 
Quinn Caldaron said. 

"It was a little rough being that it 
was my first match at a college level, 
and making the transition between high 
school and college is something I am 
going to have to get used to," freshman 



Ben Staley said. 

Staley, playing at the No. 6 singles 
position on the team is the only fresh- 
man on the starting roster this year. 

The coaches have much to say about 
the team's performance. Scott Christie, 
assistant coach for the Kingsmen tennis 

"I just feel this was our 
first match this year and 
I think that we weren't re- 
ally mentally prepared for 
this situation." 

■ Quinn Caldaron 
Junior 

program, said that the team battled very 
competitively. 

"The team looked a little rusty 
from the semester without extended 
play, but we are going to be ready for 
our first conference match on Friday 
against Pomona-Pitzer at their home 
courts. There is no doubt that we will 
be ready for them," Christie said. 

The CLU men's tennis team will 
be playing away against Pomona- 
Pitzer on Friday, Feb. 6, at 2 p.m., 
beginning another year of SC1AC 
tennis. 



California Lutheran University 



mxt 




Volume 44 No. 14 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



February 11, 2004 



Sports 


Features 


News 


Re gals tennis opens season with 
win against Pomona-Pitzer. 


CLU holds annual 
Careers in Communication Speaker Panel. 


Students participate in 8th 
annual Leadership Institute. 


See story page 10 


See story page 6 


See story page 4 



Presidential primaries take center stage 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



The presidential primaries are underway. 
Former Governor of Vermont Howard Dean 
and Massachusetts Senator John Kerry have 
become the two candidates that the media are 
focusing on. 

There are also several other candidates 
running in the state primaries, including 
Wesley Clark, John Edwards, Dennis Kucinich 
and Al Sharpton. 

Joseph Lieberman withdrew from the 
presidential race after losing the primary elec- 
tion in Delaware. 

Dean was expected by many to be the top 
contender for the 2004 presidential election. 
Instead, it was Kerry who gained momen- 
tum last week, winning primary elections in 
Arizona, Delaware, Mississippi, New Mexico 
and North Dakota. To date, Kerry has won 
seven of the first nine states contested. 

Clark won the state of Oklahoma while 
Edwards drew a victory in South Carolina. 

Kerry's recent wins came as no surprise 



to Clark University graduate student and 
Kerry campaign volunteer Jason Foreman, 
who describes Kerry as very intelligent and 
engaging. 

"The first time I met him was before he 
was officially running for president, but every- 
one still knew that he was going to. He seemed 
like a president at the time. He had a presence 
to him," Foreman said. 

The race for the Democratic nomina- 
tion is intensifying, as the Dean campaign is 
rumored to be running out of monetary sup- 
port to keep going. Dean said that he will drop 
out of the presidential race if he fails to win the 
state of Wisconsin on Feb. 17. 

Meanwhile, Clark and Edwards have 
decided not to campaign for the contests in 
Michigan, Maine, and Washington. Both can- 
didates have decided to campaign in the south- 
em region of the United States. Clark is taking 
aims tour through the state of Tennessee while 
Edwards is focusing on a trip from Memphis 
to Virginia. 

According to exit polls conducted after 
the Iowa caucus, many Americans are leaning 
more toward Kerry because they feel he is a 



stronger contender against current President 
George W. Bush. Many of those polled 
seemed to be displeased with President Bush 
and feel that he should not be re-elected. 

"The first time I met him 
... [Kerry] seemed like a 
president ... " 



Jason Foreman 
Kerry campaign volunteer 

The current delegate count is Kerry, 
260; Dean, 121; Edwards, 102; Clark, 81; 
Sharpton, 6 and Kucinich with 2. In order to 
win the nomination, one must obtain a total of 
2,162 votes. 

The next Democratic caucus will be held 
on Feb. 14 in Nevada, and the next primary 
election will take place Feb. 17 in Wisconsin. 
That election is crucial for the Dean campaign, 
as it may decide if he continues to pursue the 



nomination. 

"I would like to see Kerry for President 
and Edwards for V.P Kerry has lots of expe- 
rience in domestic affairs and as a Vietnam 
war hero. Edwards is young and enthusiastic. 
He reminds me of Bill Clinton. Most of all, 
his message is a positive one," President of 
College Democrats at CLU Saul Aguilar said. 

"1 find it funny that everyone is making 
such a big deal about the Democratic candi- 
dates when it doesn't matter because Bush is 
going to win anyway," CLU sophomore and 
Republican Davey Harding said. 

President Bush's campaign is also in full 
swing. The campaign is focusing on register- 
ing up to 3,000,000 new Republican voters 
before the election and also on fund raising. 

President Bush's main focus for his re- 
election platform is strengthening the mili- 
tary to fight terrorism, reinforcing homeland 
security and making his proposed tax cuts 
permanent. 

"I think we have put enough money into 
the military when we are cutting from things 
like education," said CLU junior Madeline 
Stacy on President Bush's re-election plat- 
form. 



KCLU news director wins big at Golden Mikes 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



KCLU News Director Lance Orozco was 
the top radio winner at the 54th annual Golden 
Mike awards, where he received a record 10 
awards. That is more than any other station in 
the Southern California market for the third 
year in a row. 

The Golden Mikes, radio's equivalent to 
the Emmys, honor local broadcasters for news 
excellence. Since his addition to KCLU in 
March 2001, Orozco has received 25 awards. 
Orozco was honored for "Best News 
Special," "Best Feature News Series," "Best 
Individual Writing," "Best News Feature," 
"Best Sports Feature," "Best Use Of Spot 
Sound," "Best News Reporting," "Best 
Entertainment Reporting," "Best Hard News 
Series Reporting" and "Best Original News 
Commentary." 

"[Orozco's] awards are great for the 
station. They bring statewide recognition to 
KCLU and National Public Radio, which is so 
often overlooked by commercial media. Now 
all of the stations know who we are," said 
KCLU General Manager Mary Olson. 

"When I arrived three years ago, we 
didn't even have a news department," Orozco 
said. "Since that time, we have become 
known in the news world as a station with 
a solid commitment to good journalism, and 
that reinforces our reputation and credibility as 
a news source." 

Orozco, who is the radio station's 
news department director, completes the 
four-person team at KCLU, which includes 



Program Director Jim Rondeau, Director of 
Member Services Katie Hodgson and Olson. 

"I have never worked 
at a place where I get 
so much community 
response. People listen 
and people care; that's 
the way it should be." 

Lance Orozco 
KCLU news director 

"Lance is one of my three superstars, and 
I am incredibly proud of him. I am not only 
happy for him professionally, but personally as 
well," Olson said. 

Orozco, a graduate of USC's Annenberg 
School of Journalism, has had an extensive 
20-year career in the Southern California 
broadcast market, covering news and weather 
at KCBS-TV, KEYT-TV (Channel 3) in Santa 
Barbara and most recently at KNBC-TV. 
where he wrote news for anchors such as Paul 
Moyer, 

"That is what drew me here to KCLU. 
I missed doing on-air stuff"," Orozco said. 
"What was refreshing was the opportunity 
to go out and cover the news for the com- 
munity. Stations should be responsible to the 
community they serve, and most stations no 
longer do that. 

"i have never worked in a place where I 
get so much community response. People lis- 
ten and people care; that's the way it should be. 



That's what makes it fun," Orozco said. 

In days when radio is, more often than 
not, computer-run, Orozco and his team pride 
themselves on their connection to the com- 
munity. 

"We serve the nearly 60,000 people who 
listen to us each week, by telling them about 
things that matter in their lives like what to do 



and where to go for information during the 
recent fires, or how the state budget crisis is 
effecting Ventura County," Orozco said. "We 
are basically a very effective use of radio fre- 
quency." 

Interested students can locate Orozco 
and KCLU on 88.3 FM in Ventura County or 
102.3 FM in Santa Barbara. 




KCLU News Director Lance Orozco adjusts the studio soundboard. 



®M? ^ISH® 



The Echo 



Calendar 



February 11, 2004 




today 

February II 

Sexual Responsibility Week 

ASCLU Executive Cabinet Elections 

SUB 

All Day 

Worship 

Chapel 
10:10a.m. 

Kingsmen Basketball vs. University of 
La Verne 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 

Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Rotaract Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 

februarv 12 



"Make Some Noise" Hunger 
Awareness Dinner 

Nelson Room 
5:30 p.m. 

College Democrats Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
7 p.m. 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 

Intramural Softball Rosters Due 

SUB 

by 1 1 p.m. 



friday 

februarv 13 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Club LV: Battle of the Sexes 

SUB 

9 p.m. 

Sunday 

februarv 15 



Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 

9 p.m. 







monday 

februarv 16 



College Democrats - Activism Week 

ASCLV-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLV-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLV-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 



tuesday 

februarv 17 



Regal 's Basketball vs. Occidental 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 



CONGRATS from Owicron Pelta Kappa to the recipients of the Leadership Excellence Award for January: 
BECKY BAPERTSCHER, JOHN McANPREW AND PASTOR MELISSA MAX WELL-POHERTY 



C*3 



Tutors Needed: SI5-SI8/hr lo slarl. Teach one-on-one. m-horr 
SAT I Malh and/or Verbal & Academic subjects in your area i 
expertise Paid training. Flexible hours Reliable transportalic 
required. Mail, fax, or email cover letter and resume. Indue 
standardized test scores (SAT MI, GRB. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

0911 W. l>ico Blvd., Suite PII-K; Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (.110) 282-6424 

or email resume to: instructorhiring6@aeeeducation.com 



Homework Help: For high school student in Oxnard : 
a week. S20/hr. 

If interested, contact Cruz at: 
(805)4«-.r2l9 



For Sale: A Sea 
$500. 



52" Sc 



i TV In 



elle: 



cundil 



■sled, contact Carollu 
(805) 987-5453 



Classified ads 
can be placed 
on the Calendar 
page for a flat 
rate regardless 
of word count. 
Discount avail- 
able for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads 
are subject to 
editing for con- 
tent & clarity. 
Call: 
(SOS) 493-3865 



PAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 

Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 20 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800 -$3500+ for the sun- 
nier working with children outdoors ! 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 



DISTRIBUTE BROCHURES 

Earn $375 to $560 a month work- 
ing only 22 hours a month! Pref- 
erably Monday through Friday. 
Must be available after 2 p.m. 

For more information, call: 
(866) 7-TUTORS 



FREE SUPPORT CROUP 

for Eating Disorder Recoverers 

Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the F-Building 

Sponsored by the CLU Counseling Center and Marriage, Family 
Child Center, in conjunction with the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). 

For more information, please feel free to call or email me or log onto 

http://www.altrue.net/site/anadweb/ 

ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 

Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW Ext: 3390 ccollettca>clunet.edu 



French Club LACMA Excursion 



LACMA ERTE/OPERA & BALLETS RUSSES/DANCE 

EXHIBITION CELEBRATES CREATIVE EXPLOSION IN 

EARLY 2 0TH-CENTURY THEATER 

Exhibition presents extremely rare costumes with many accompanying drawings by Erti as 

welt as costumes by artists Henri Matisse, Son/a De/aunay and others 

Join us Sunday. Feb. 22 nd , 

TO SEE THIS ACCLAIMED EXHIBITION 
MEET ON CAMPUS AT 1 1 AM, (CARPOOLING $5 W/ CLU ID) 

Contact Rachel for more info: 
428-3789 rhelfan@clunet.edu 



Resume Writing 

Today. Februarv 11. 2004 at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

This workshop will cover types of resumes and uses, resume format, con- 
tent, newest trends, using action verbs, presenting internship and volunteer 
experiences, and skills employers are looking for. We will touch on cover, 
reference, recommendation, and thank you letters. We will also be avail- 
able to answer questions on your resume. Bring what you have and join us. 



Proactive Job Search 

Thursday. Februarv 19. 2004 
at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

Did you know that applying for jobs 
from newspaper ads and web listing 
is the most ineffective method for 
the job search? Develop tactics for 
apporaching employers and a strat- 
egy that will generate interviews. 
This workshop will cover a num- 
ber of proactive methods that will 
help you find the right job for you! 



Discover Your 
Career Options 

Thursday. Februarv 12. 2004 
at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

Not sure what you want to do 
with your life? Trying to choose 
a major or emphasis area? This 
workshop will assist you with 
gathering information on your- 
self and career opportunities 
so you can start building your 
resume in the right direction. 



Where are YOU going? 




Come find ouf more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 
x3750 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 
Open Mon - Fri., 77.-30-J.-20 



No appointment Htidiarv! 
CLU Jtudetlt luppori Icrvkei 

Qucitlonirt (SOS) 40J - JSli 



f* 



r c FUt out «*« #WJ*SA 



III FAFIA Werbihepi beyln Friday, January 10th 2004 and 

(onllnut every Monday A Friday In February. 
All worbihopi are trem lOiOOant'lliOOam In Library Rm. 7 

Don't watt until the March 2nd deadline! 

The earlier you till out your FAFSA the better chance you have at receiving 

as much money at you can for financial aid. 



% 







ces 



_ 


-Dr 


FSA 


IN (fVt .■ 


nanSLton Number) 


- 


■■ III .-"I ' I-'.' , .Hi, II."' '■.'-■ 



BSU: BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 

Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, 
AND FELLOWSHIP!!! 



®jre %<hm<b 



February 11, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Spring career workshops scheduled 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University Career 
Services will be offering a series of career 
workshops this semester. The workshops 
will cover a variety of subjects from 
resume writing to interview skills. 

There will be five workshops over the 
course of the semester. Each workshop is 
free to students and alumni and lasts one 
and a half hours. The workshops are led 
by CLU's Director of Career Services 
Cindy Lewis and Career Counselor 
Cynthia Smith. 

"The workshops are geared toward 
all levels. Whether you're a freshman or 
a graduate with 10 years experience, the 
content will be relevant," Lewis said. 

The workshops will be kicked off with 
with "Discover Your Career Options," in 
which students can learn about choosing 
the right major for the careers they want. 
It will be held on Thursday, Feb. 12, and 
again on Tuesday, Feb. 24. 

'"Discover Your Career Options" is 
ideal for those students who have not yet 
decided on a career path," Lewis said. 

"The workshops are 
geared toward all lev- 
els. Whether you're 
a freshman or a 
graduate ... the content 
will be relevant." 

Cindy Lewis 
Director of Career Services 




Photograph by Dan Norton 

CLU Director of Career Services Cindy Lewis introduces the guests at the Careers in Communication 
Speaker Panel. 



Workshops will be held in the Nelson 
Room at 5:30 p.m. on their respective 
dates. 

The other workshops being offered 
are "Resume Writing" on Wednesday, 
Feb. 11; "Proactive Job Search" on 
Thursday, Feb. 19; "Interviewing for 
Offers" on Tuesday, March 2 (held in 
Overton Hall); and "Salary Negotiations" 
on Thursday, March 4. 

"Anyone graduating should take as 
many as they can," Lewis said. "Any 
student that attended all of the seminars 
would be in great shape." 



"I think it's a great opportunity to 
start planning for the future," junior Jenny 
Pauley said. 

According to Career Services, many 
CLU juniors and seniors do not have a 
resume, and many more are unsure what 
career they would like to go into, despite 
the resources available on campus. It is 
for this reason that the workshops were 
developed. 

"[The workshops] are a nice way to 
present information that we typically go 
over in individual counseling sessions to 
larger groups of people," Smith said. 



In addition to the workshops. Career 
Services is holding a Career Expo on 
Wednesday. March 10, from 10 a.m. until 
2 p.m. in the Quad. 

"We encourage students and alumni 
to take advantage of these resources," 
Smith said. 

For students who wish to register for 
any of these workshops, e-mail Cynthia 
Smith at csmith@clunet.edu. Include 
name, desired workshop, major, anticipat- 
ed graduation date, a phone number and 
e-mail address. Or, call Career Services at 
493-3200. 



Call for senior 

Commencement 

Speakers ! 

The Student Life Committee is 

looking for seniors to submit a 

Commencement speech of two 

pages or four minutes of speaking 

time with the idea of highlighting 

what makes California Lutheran 

University worthwhile and unique. 

All submissions must be turned in to Leah Herner at 
herner@clunet.edu by March 1. 

Selected students will perform for the Student 
Life Committee and the committee will then 
decide on who will speak at Commencement. 



Students prepare for ASCLU 
Executive Cabinet elections 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



The ASCLU-G has announced that 
it will be holding elections for Executive 
Cabinet officers on Wednesday, Feb. 18, 
and Thursday, Feb. 19. Students who wish 
to cast their vote may do so in the SUB. 

The ASCLU-G is composed of 
an Executive Cabinet, a Senate, and a 
Programs Board. However, elections for 
the Senate and the Programs Board will 
not take place at this time. 

"[Executive Cabinet officers] have 
to attend monthly meetings with each 
member of their cabinet," said ASCLU-G 
President Robert Boland. 

In addition, officers must meet 
weekly with the committee that they 
are in charge of (either the Senate or the 
Programs Board) and with Director of 
Student Affairs Michael Fuller. 

According to an informational 
packet distributed by the ASCLU-G, the 
Executive Cabinet provides leadership to 
assure the execution and implementation 
of tiie policies and programs performed by 
the other branches [of the ASCLU-G], as 
well as formally representing the interests 
of the students. 

"One of the most important character- 
istics of a candidate is patience. There is 
always something that needs to be done," 



"One of the most 
important characteristics 
of a candidate is pa- 
tience." 



Robert Boland 
ASCLU-G President 



Boland said. 

Students who are interested in run- 
ning for an Executive Cabinet position 
must write a statement of candidacy and 
must attend a mandatory meeting on Feb. 
10 at 6 p.m. in the SUB. 

At the meeting, all prospective can- 
didates will receive a handout detailing 
campaign policies. 

Campaigning will commence on Feb. 
10 following the meeting. 

Prior to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 10, 
candidates may only campaign verbally. 
Candidates who fail to observe this rule 
may be disqualified. 

Candidates may display posters in the 
cafeteria, in the corridor between the Caf 
and the old snack shop, and in residence 
halls. 

Any students with questions regard- 
ing the election, may contact Boland at 
(805)241-2272. 



<EMu tOW 



The Echo 



NEWS 



February 11, 2004 



Students participate in Leadership Institute 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Student Programs held its eighth annual 
Leadership Institute on Saturday, Feb. 7, 
entitled "Mmm...Mmm Good." The event 
offered students various workshops to attend 
throughout the day. 

The morning began with a keynote 
presentation by author and CLU School of 
Education professor Laurel Schmidt. She dis- 
cussed Howard Gardner's theory of multiple 
intelligences and defined each of the nine dif- 
ferent intelligences. 

"Good leaders, like good 
friends, make a vision for 
us. They inspire us." 



Melissa Maxwell-Doherty 
Pastor 



The intelligences, according to Gardner's 
theory, are existential, kinesthetic, interper- 
sonal, intrapersonal, logic, musical, naturalis- 
tic, verbal and visual. Schmidt also went on 
to discuss the importance of motivation and 
how people should make an inventory of their 
strengths, weaknesses and talents. 

"You need to look at your motivation and 
ask where is it coming from," Schmidt said. 

The first session of the day, called "Setting 
the Table," offered various workshops that stu- 
dents could choose to attend. Each workshop 
lasted 50 minutes. 

All of the workshops were led by staff 
members and current CLU students. They 
included such topics as "Who's Renting Space 



in Your Skull?," "Servitude Leadership," 
"A Journey into Joumaling," "Christian 
Leadership," "Saying Yes and Saying No: 
Finding Your Voice for Leadership" and "One 
Shockingly Refreshing Intelligence." 

In "One Shockingly Refreshing 
Intelligence," Pastor Melissa Maxwell- 
Doherty discussed the importance of emo-. 
tional intelligence, relationship management, 
self-management and social awareness. She 
stressed the idea of being able to manage one's 
emotional life without letting it completely 
take over. Maxwell-Doherty also talked about 
the qualities that make a good leader. 

"Good leaders, like good friends, make 
a vision for us. They inspire us," Maxwell- 
Doherty said. 

The second session, "Gathering the 
Ingredients," introduced workshops like 
"Avoiding Stereotypes" and "Let's Get 
Personal," in which students took a personality 
assessment to learn more about themselves. 

Other workshops were related to career 
success, as well as how to motivate others 
while keeping oneself motivated at the same 
time. 

In "What's in it for me? Motivating a 
Team," Director of Residence Life Angela 
Naginey and Area Residence Coordinator 
Christine Paul showed students new and 
different ways to motivate and keep a team 
successful. 

The roundtable discussions gave students 
a chance to talk about the importance of time 
management, overcoming burnout, being in a 
sophomore slump and what to do after gradu- 
ation. 

In "Overcoming Burnout," Pastor 
Scott Maxwell-Doherty, sophomore Rachel 
Pensack-Rinehart and junior Dave Sundby 
talked about taking time out and realizing 
what one's priorities in order to avoid mental 
and physical exhaustion. 




You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ 1VA. Liberal Studies for paracducaton 

■ M. Ed. Teacher Preparation 

■ M.S. Special Education 

■ M.A. Curriculum & Instruction 

■ M.A. Educational Administration 

■ M.S. Counseling and Guidance 

■ Pupil Personnel Services 

■ College Student Personnel 

■ Ed.D. Educational Leadership 

ISfoj nil pnypaun iin aitflcmleA ■■< mtlhibk til all loauion. 
Programs are acaediteo) bylVASC. imd ( CTl (ipprnvd 



1> 



You are invited 

Grad 




MJii?r»nn 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



Call for more iriformation 
Scatitm j.. limited and reservation tot 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angeles 
clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/Graduate 




Photograph hy Marybel Lopez 

CLU School of Education Professor Laurel Schmidt discusses correla- 
tions between intelligence and leadership in her lecture last week. 



The final session, "Serving the Meal," 
focused on developing marketing skills, build- 
ing a leadership portfolio, better presenting 
oneself through speaking skills and dealing 
with money. 

In "Big Bucks... No Whammy!," 
Director of Student Programs Robby Larson 
showed students how to responsibly manage 
their money. Larson explained the importance 
of making out a budget and sticking to it. 

"Be your own person and don't follow 
the crowd," Larson said. 



The day ended with Schmidt reiterating 
Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, as 
well as talking to the students about what they 
had learned and how they would apply it to 
their everyday life. 

"It was different than last year's. The 
range of topics they presented on was needed 
for the students. For those students already in 
leadership, it let them expand on it. For the 
new students, it helped them build a founda- 
tion on leadership," sophomore Kurt Sanders 
said. 



Security Alert: Break-ins continue 



By Klay Peterson 
CLU security release 



Between the hours of 10 p.m. Tuesday, 
Feb. 3, and 1 pjn, Wednesday, Feb. 4, an 
unknown suspects) broke into three vehicles 
parked behind Mogen Hall and stole stereo 
speakers, compact discs, CD players and a 
cell phone. One of the vehicles was forc- 
ibly entered, and two of the vehicles were 
unlocked. 

The Thousand Oaks Police Department 



has advised California Lutheran University 
that it has received reports of similiar vehicle 
burglaries throughout the city in. recent 
weeks. 

Students are cautioned to keep their 
vehicles locked and to safeguard personal 
property in the trunk or out of view. 

Faculty members and students with any 
information about these thefts .or the identi- 
fication of the suspects, are encouraged to 
contact Campus Security at x3208. 




ISSY's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



Troubleshooting Datatel 
Problems 

Members of the CLU community who 
experience problems with Datatel may contact 
the Datatel support group in 1SS. These techni- 
cians are skilled in resolving a wide range of 
Datatel issues. Those seeking assistance can 
help Datatel technicians solve problems more 
expeditiously by providing a "picture." For 
instance, if an error message has appeared on 
the screen, "take a picture" and send it to the 
technician. Pasting the image into Microsoft 
Word (not WordPad) and attaching the docu- 
ment to an e-mail message is the best way to 
send it. Follow these steps to capture a screen 



image and send it to the Datatel technician: 

1 . On a PC computer with the error mes- 
sage displayed, press the Print Screen key 
(often located on the top row of keys on the 
keyboard). Although there is no visible indica- 
tion, this places an image of the screen on the 
clipboard. 

2. Next, open a new Microsoft Word 
document and paste the image. 

3. Select the image; the Picture Toolbar 
appears. 

4. Use the Crop tool to trim away all por- 
tions of the image except the error message. 

5. Save the document. 

6. Now open a New Message window 
in Eudora. 

7. Using the Attach function, browse to 
the saved image document and attach it to the 
e-message. 

8. Finally, add any comments about the 
problem in the body of the message and click 
the Send button to transmit. 

Questions about creating a screen shot 
and sending it via e-mail may be directed to 
the Help Desk (x3698 or help@clunet.edu). 
Questions concerning Datatel issues should be 
directed to the coordinator of client services 
(x3939 or graham@clunet.edu). 



February 11, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



What are you doing for Valentine's Day? 




Katie Pfeiffer, psychology. 2004 



Jeremy Pool, communication, 2006 



Annie Knutzen, psychology, 2006 



"Going out for my boyfriend's and my "Celebrating my birthday, since it's the "No plans yet. I haven't thought about it 

best friend's birthday. We're going out to day after." yet. I was actually in 'Victoria's Secret' and it 

dinner" reminded me of it" 



Jennifer Main, communication. 2007 



"Going out with the girls.' 













1 


1 - -' A 




J) 






y^-'H 




Sarah Hauer. biology, 2006 



Iver Meldahl, political science, 2005 



Adam Jussel, business, 2005 



Josie Franciose, communication. 2006 



"I'll be sorting the Valentine's Day pack- "I couldn't care less about Valentine's "Going to San Diego to see my family." "I'm either going back to Salt Lake or 

ages in the mail center." Day. I don't have bitterness towards it back to Newport. I haven't decided yet." 

because 1 got dumped on Valentine's Day; it 
just doesn't mean anything to me." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Sierra McGuire. Photography by Claire Hillard. 



This week's crossword puzzle 



puzz141 





2 


3 


* 


U 


5 


6 


1 JH e 


9 


10 


" 










13 




. |g§ 14 








15 


j 


■ 

26 


■ 

20 


10 






26 


17 

21 


22 


18 
27 
















23 




■ 












28 








H&29 




! jflB 30 




" 


32 






i m 33 




LB 34 








35 


42 


38 


IT- 


36 




44 


40 


»7 






■ 


I 














41 


43 










47 




48 




49 


50 






■ 






62 






S3 1 








r 








55 






! Hm 




MSB 57 











41 Midwestern stale (aDbr ) 


22 Western state (abbr.) 


1 Ripped 


43 1 had (contraction) 




44 Is reeling bad (pi ) 


26 Pusoner (slang) 




• 45 U.S. territory (abbr ) 


27 Piece ol glass 




47 Owns 






49 Roof overhangs 


29 Spout 




51 Brewed drink 








33 Male sheep 




55 No votes 


34 Raised platform 




56 Surprise 


36 Apple drink 












39 Southern New England state (abbr | 




DOWN 


40 Blockading a town 


23 Right (abbr.) 

24 Wailing noise 
26 Deep hole 


1 Tropical plant 


42 Authored Two Years Before the Mast 


3 Free 


44 Acknowledge openly 


4 Edward's nickname 


45 Saucy 




5 Slender wooden stick 


46 Beams 


30 Garden implement 


6 Dash 

7 Indicates three (pref.J 


48 Pig pen 

50 Southern constellation 


33 Jogged 

34 Mend 






9 Large vessel 


53 Einsteinium symbol 


35 Oitection (abbr ) 

36 Hat 

37 Undressed 


1 Forever 




16 Stalk 






1 7 Reverberation of sound 




40 Uttered 


20 Great lake 





Visit the Echo online at: 
www.clunet.edu/echo 



The Echo 



FEATURES 



February 11, 2004 



Communication panel stresses internships, optimism 



By jimmy Fox 
Staff Writer 



"Get an internship." That phrase was 
the reoccumng theme throughout the second 
annua! Careers in Communications Speakers 
Panel held in the Nelson Room on Feb. 1 1 . 

The goal of the panel discussion was 
tor those who have pursued careers in the 
entertainment industry to teach communica- 
tion majors how to succeed in the industry. 
Approximately 40 students attended the event, 
and the panel gave them advice that was 
simple and direct. 

"You have to do an internship," said Tom 
Helmer, a former San Diego sports anchor. "A 
lot of people show up and say they want to be 
on-air, but after experiencing the internship 
they decide they would rather be a producer or 
work in some other area of production." 

During his portion of the panel discus- 
sion. Helmer went on to explain thai in the 
entertainment business an internship is not 
only a foot in the door but serves as an audi- 
tion with that company. 

"Anyone that is worth their weight in salt, 
wants to be a sponge and keeps their mouth 




Matt Nasby. a 2002 CLU graduate, speaks 
in Palm Springs, CaliJ. 
shut, will usually be offered a job by the station 
they intern for," he said. 

Another one of the panel's speakers, 
Adam Cohen, a producer and head director 
of "The Simple Life," starring Pans Hilton, 
dispelled any preconceived notions college 
students may have about internships. 

"An internship is not what you think it is. 
Some people think to themselves, 'I'm going 



Photograph by Dan Norton. 
of his success as a disc jockey for Star 106. 9 

to do an internship at MTV and hang out with 
Kid Rock all day.' You're like, 'where are all 
the parties at?' And then you're not on any of 
the lists to go to those parties. What you're 
really doing is sitting in a room somewhere 
logging tapes," he said. 

Though the work is not glamorous and 
often the intern feels unappreciated (consider- 
ing most entertainment internships are unpaid,) 



Cohen said that internships, in the end, still 
prove to be an invaluable experience. 

"It's who you meet and who you know, 
it's not about the work, it's the relationships 
you build while you're there because they 
could be the ones to give you your first real 
job," he said. 

Failure and rejection should be expected, 
because the business is highly competitive. 

"You're going to get a lot of no's before 
you get that one yes," said Matt Nasby. a 2002 
graduate of California Lutheran University. 
Since graduating nearly two years ago, Nasby 
has sustained a successful run as a radio jock 
for Star 106.9 in Palm Springs, Calif. He is 
thankful he has been given the opportunity 
of getting paid to do what he loves, admitting 
that the road to success in this business had its 
bumps. 

"I didn't hear back from 13 different radio 
stations before I got my first gig. Once you get 
that job the best advice I can give anybody is 
to always be on time and take the initiative to 
learn something new everyday. If you show 
the people you work for that you really want 
to be there, they will really want you there," 
Nasby said. 



"Butterfly Local hair sa lons offer quality service 

_—,.... . •• . r„ ViiriHri p^ r p» Services include S45 haircuts. S50 color "We nave a very friendly atmosphen 



Effect" is 
original and 
action packed 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



The storyline will make you think 
twice; "Butterfly Effect" is surely on 
its way to becoming a top new release. 
Starring actor Ashton Kutcher, known 
for MTV's television show "Punk'd," 
played Evan Treborn. Kutcher's costarts 
with Amy Smart (Kayleigh Miller) fror 
"The '70s" and "Win a Date with Tac 
Hamilton!" and Ethan Suplee (Thumper 
from "Remember the Titans." 

When Evan thinks that his unusm 
blackouts have ceased, after seven years 
of dealing with them as a child, he 
reminded once more of the pain anc 
suffering they once caused him. This 
trauma begins moments after Evar 
reads an old journal entry that he he 
kept over the years. He does this 
part to suppress his chronic blackouts 
Immediately he starts reliving his once- 
forgotten memories one by one. He is 
confused and refuses to accept the idea 
of reliving his past. 

Thus, in order to reminisce more 
clearly about his shady past and confirm 
what is reality and what is not, Evan must 
go back home in search of his beloved 
childhood friend, Kayleigh. Evan fears 
that she may be the only one who is able 
to unleash the truth about what hap- 
pened years ago. Unfortunately, Evan 
must learn the hard way that fate people 
should not meddle with their fate, for 
repercussions can be unexpected. 

The film is packed with new and 
awesome special effects, suspens- 
ful scenes, horrifying flashbacks and 
wildly dramatic episodes. It embodies 
originality with an unpredictable twist. 
I would absolutely watch it a second 
time, if not a third. I recommend that 
everyone experiences it in order to be 
blown away. 



Among several hair salons located in 
the Thousand Oaks, Calif, area. Salon Rouge 
has to be one of the most modem-looking 
salons available, it opened this past January. 
Its style is far from that of most traditional 
salons. Located at 1341 E. Thousand Oaks 
Blvd. #106, its comfortable couches, textured 
curtains and long pillars create a warm, homey . 
feel. The co-owners, Guy and Lynn Davis, 
have been in the business about 1 years. 

What makes their salon unique is "the 
roominess and space [and] also the comradery 
of the people who work together," Lynn Davis 
said. 



Services include S45 haircuts. S50 color 
treatments, $85 perms and S90 weaves (prices 
vary). Extras include manicures, pedicures, 
eyebrow waxes and facials. 

Salon Rouge is the place to go for those 
wanting to enjoy a peaceful afternoon. 

For those desiring an all-day experience, 
try going to Kyle and Co. Salon and Spa. It is 
located at 1772 E. Avenida de los Arboles in 
the Oakbrook Plaza. This salon is a full-ser- 
vice salon and offers trendy hair styles and full 
massages. Haircuts start at S25. Cut and blow- 
dry is $40, color treatment is S40 and perms 
are $75 (prices vary). Services given at the 
fulr'-day spa consist of massages (one hour is 
S75), body waxes, aromatherapy and steam 
showers. Lunch is provided. 



"We have a very friendly atmosphere. 
[We are] fairly pnced — under the norm — 
with a lot of qualified hair dressers," said 
Lorin Ferreirr, manager of Kyle and Co. and 
daughter to owner Kyle Ferreirr. 

For all those students who are on a bud- 
get, there is also a Supercuts hair salon which 
is located at 1748 N. Moorpark Rd. near 
Sally's Beauty Supply. Haircuts come out to 
$14, shampoos are S5, and conditioning treat- 
ments and braiding are S 10 each. Supercuts 
offers both stylish cuts and low prices. 

"The prices and the quick service — and 
the high quality energy" are what sets them 
apart from others in the area. Shift Manager 
Gail Ostrandr said. 



Sexual Responsibility Week 
Feb. 11 at 8:30 p.m. is 'Sex in the Lounge' in the Mt. Clef 

Plounge and Mogan Hall Lounge. 

Feb. 12 at 10 p.m. is 'The Dating Game' and 'Battle of the 

Sexes' at the Need. 

Questions? Call Sally Sagen at x3304 



Calling All Good Men! 

Are you, or do you know a 

top-of-the-line CLU male? 

On Feb. 27 the Office of 

Student Programs is 
sponsoring the first-ever 
Mr. Kingsmen contest. 
Contestants can be nomi- 
nated by someone else or 
nominate themselves. Nom- 
inations are available in the 
SUB and are due Feb. 13 by 
5 p.m. 
Questions? Call Nicole 
Hackbarthatx3521 




/, 



Get the Best Dates and find the person you Deserve with the Right Photo! 
It's Easy! We'll replace your existing Online Photo with a Professional Portrait that 
will Guarantee your Pcture will go from Meek to Sleek! If you don't have a picture yet, l V ) 
call us for your new Online Portrait. First impressions are everything! A Picture is worth a 1000 words! 
Package includes: 
• Hall Hour Portrait Session • 20-25 Online Pholo proofs 
• 2 final Pholos lormalted & retouched for your online service emailed lo you 
• Free Custom 8 x 10" • Available in Color and Black & While. ONLY S12S Reg. S299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

It you're going lo find a dale on the Web, you better have a really good picture"-The New York Times 

HEADSHOT HIGHWAY ,— i ~ 

Partialis for Online Dating ... I I W 



February 11, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 7 



Students remodel dorm rooms "Trading Spaces" style 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



What happens when friendly resi- 
dence hall occupants take down their fenc- 
es and give neighbors free redecoration 
reign on any room' 7 You get California 
Lutheran University's version of "Trading 
Spaces." The increasingly popular TLC 
program received its own local treatment 
on Jan. 30 - 31. Students were allowed 



to do just about anything wanted with a 
$200 budget permitted. Given 24 hours, 
students worked from 5 to 9 p.m. on 
Friday and resumed work early the fol- 
lowing day, picking up from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. The rooms were then revealed to 
their occupants. 

The show was organized by 
Coordinator for Student Programs Nicole 
Hackbarth and her intern, Rachelle 
Berglund. According to Hackbarth, CLU's 
"Trading Spaces" ran relatively true to the 



TLC version afterwhich it was modeled. 

"It [CLU's "Trading Spaces"] is very 
realistic. Each room had a designer and 
budget. There were budget cuts, conflict, 
concerns over the designs, carpenters, 
seamstresses [and] hosts," she said. 

"It was fun and a lot of hard work. 
We took over and did as we pleased; we 
painted furniture," said sophomore partic- 
ipant Katy Svennungsen. "At first I didn't 
like it, but now I am growing accustomed 
to [the room]. 



High levels of excitement and expec- 
tation are brewing for the show among 
students. 

"[I'm] really excited [about the 
show]. 1 wanted to be in it, but found out 
too late." senior Amy LaFata said. 

Before anyone jumps the gun on the 
redecoration bandwagon, they might want 
to check out the show's premiere. The 
premiere will be held on Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. 
in the Forum. 



Dinner stresses change at CLU and around the world 



By Kristina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



How much leftover food gets thrown 
away at the caf after every meal? How 
much energy and water is wasted in one 
single California Lutheran University 
dorm room every day° How many students 
use their blue recycling bins as a trash can 
instead of their intended purpose? 

These were some of the issues men- 
tioned during the world hunger discus- 
sions Thursday evening, Feb. 5, in the 
Nelson Room. Fifty to 60 people attended 
the event titled "Make Some Noise," 
which was put together by the Community 
Service Center and Student Life. 

CLU sophomore Rachel Pensack- 
Rinehart helped organize the event and 
come up with the dinner theme. 

"This is the second year we've done 
it," Pensack-Rinehart said. "We wanted 
a way to get students to participate. We 
thought that this is a really friendly atmo- 
sphere to eat dinner and just have discus- 
sions at the little tables." 

Four different people spoke during 
the dinner, reading stories about people 
around the world who face hunger on a 
day-to-day basis. Each table was assigned 
a table host. Between the stories, the hosts 
led the table in discussions about world 
hunger awareness and ways that the prob- 
lem can be solved. 

"Global hunger is kind of a passion of 
mine," said sophomore Karis Rower. "It's 
a big issue and there's a lot of things that 



" It's a big issue and there's 
a lot of things that need to be 
done. This is a great opportu- 
nity to learn or to discuss and 
get other ideas about what 
we can do." 

Karis Rower 
Sophomore 

need to be done. This is a great opportu- 
nity to learn or to discuss and get other 
ideas about what we can do." 

Many CLU students who live on cam- 
pus take all of the amenities that are avail- 
able to them for granted. For example, 
they may disregard the never-ending hot 
water in the showers and the fact that stu- 
dents can leave the lights and television on 
all day and not worry about the electricity 
bill and the buffet-style cafeteria allows 
them to pile their plates with food- only 
to eat one bite and throw the rest away. 

"I think that CLU students kind of 
live in a bubble, and I fall victim to that, 
too," Rower said. "We don't have any clue 
what our government is doing in other 
countries, and what the lives of people in 
the rest of the world are like." 

This is why the Hunger Awareness 
Dinner was created. 

"The ultimate goal was just to raise 
hunger awareness. I think as Americans, 
or as anyone human, we keep hunger 
so far away, and we try to hide it. We 
don't think that it is here when it really 



Valentine's Day Shopping tips 



Tips are compiled by Farima Nojoumi. 



Valentine's Day is right around the comer, and if you are like every other person around, 
shopping can be stressful and very chaotic. There are many ideas to keep in mind when taking 
that first step. Remember these tips to make your life easier and your shopping experience as 
delightful as possible. 

1. Shop Wisely: 

• Know who you're dealing with. 
. • Protect your privacy. 

• While online, order only on a secure server. 

• Guard your online password. 

2. Know Your Rights: 

• Check the return policy. 

• Read the fine print. 

• Check delivery dates. 

• Review warranties. 

3. Get the Best Deal: 

• Compare prices. 

• Check shipping and handling fees. 

• Order early to allow plenty of time for shipment and delivery. 

4. Keep Good Records: 

• Track your purchases. 

• Keep store receipts & online receipts. 







A 








^^^^ 












N. ' * 




^^^/3 




jmf^m 


il ; 








^^^~^^. 


Hi 


-m 


-*■■ 














Pholgraph by Todd Kugler 



Students enjoy the meal provided at the Hunger Awareness Dinner. 



is a problem and it isn't new," Pensack- 
Rinehart said. 

Coordinator for Community Service 
Angela Rowley also helped organize the 
event and was pleased by who attended. 

"I think it was very successful, and 
I was very appreciative of the faculty and 
administration that attended because they 
added a lot to the student comments. They 
were all able to talk and people left feel- 
ing that they could make a difference by 
talking and spreading the word," Rowley 
said. 

The event encouraged participants 
to fast for 24 hours, beginning after the 
dinner. 



"The 30 Hour Famine organization 
always has their big event of a 30-hour- 
famine around this time," Pensack- 
Rinehart said. "We've used their resources 
and their website quite a bit, so we encour- 
age a 24 -hour famine, but some people do 
30 hours." 

Along with paper fliers with quotes 
from disadvantaged people from around 
the world, at every plate there was a but- 
ton with the statistic: "More than 800 mil- 
lion people in the world go hungry." 

For more information about hunger 
awareness at CLU, contact the CLU 
Community Service Center at x398l or 
email them at csc.clunet.edu. 



<A (Beautiful Look 

hull-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805) 492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

A\ I E Avenue de Lm Arbnle.v in Thousand Oak* 
Near Rue Aid and Whole Fo.nK 



Have you taken a great photo lately? Drop it 

off at the Echo office with a one line caption 

that includes names and location. 

It could run as a Feature photo! 

Questions? Call the Echo at x3465. 



®MP ?E<flH* 



8 



The Echo 



OPINION 



February 11, 2004 




How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W.'OlsenRd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 



Vote and aim for the head 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



"Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel " 
-Samuel Johnson 

"I expected to find the weapons," 
President Bush said during an Oval office 
interview last week. That sounds like a clear 
admission of defeat. Perhaps waving a white 
flag would have been belter for his re-election 
campaign. 

Bush's statement reminds me of Richard 
Millhous Nixon. He never expected to get 



caught either. Ron Ziegler couldn't have been 
more surprised when the Great Hammer of 
Defeat came down in the hot summer of 1974. 
Ziegler once called Watergate a "third-rate 
burglary" and he managed to outlast Spiro 
Agnew and avoid prison. Ari Fleischer had 
it easy compared to Scott McLellan who will 
probably have to lie straight-faced as often as 
Ziegler did. 

The job of press secretary has never been 
easy, but some had it belter than others. It's 
unlikely that Pierre Salinger, press secretary to 
John F. Kennedy, ever had a bad day. Kennedy 
wasn't a liar and he had a pool instead of a 
press center. When NLxon arrived, he filled the 
pool with cement and built the press center 
on top of it. But on quiet days a visitor with 
the right kind of ears can still hear the ghostly 
echoes of Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe run- 
ning around, laughing and snorting cocaine. 

Nixon was a Monster, but he improved 
U.S. relations with China and helped pass the 
26th Amendment to the Constitution, lowering 
the voting age from 21 to 18. And that is the 



point of this rambling missive Dear Reader; 
we have the right to vote. 

Register to vote early. Contact members 
of the Republican or Democratic Club on 
campus for help. Or register online at <http: 
//www.ss. ca.gov/elections/votereg 1 .html>. 
And once registered, remember to vote! The 
most patriotic thing you can do this year is 
vote. Putting an American flag sticker on your 
SUV is not being patriotic — you cannot sup- 
port your ideals while driving. Yellow nbbons 
do not help the troops in Afghanistan or Iraq. 
Patriotic symbols do not change policy. 

Henry Louis Mencken, one of the great- 
est political commentators and newspapennen 
ever, once said, "The only good bureaucrat 
is one with a pistol at his head. Put it in his 
hand and it's good-by to the Bill of Rights." 
When we don't vote, we voluntarily give up 
our right to self-government — we remove 
the pistol from the politician's head and put 
it in his hand. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo Staff and CLU, 

In the latest print of the Echo, 
Feb. 4, I realized there was something 
missing. Oh yes, any print about the 
Spring women's teams, for example, the 
women's Softball team had an alumni 
game the same day as the baseball team, 
yet not one word was printed about it. 
Do I dare say that is offensive? Every 
athlete, male or female, works extremely 
hard at this school to do well in academ- 
ics and on the field, court etc. 

Why can't each team get the same 
coverage? There isn't less competitive- 
ness in women's sports, so why should 
we cheat our student athletes in the one 
paper that this school can full on brag 
about its accomplishments. 

Do you realize the women's Softball 
team is the only team this year to defend 
a SCIAC tide? But yet, I am willing to 
bet not everyone knows that. CLU has a . 
women's dive program this year with an 



amazing chance to do some great things, 
but where are the stories? 

Tennis is another example, con- 
tinually I see women's articles short and 
sweet, with the exception of women's 
basketball maybe; and that is awesome 
for them! However, what makes bas- 
ketball any different from Softball? Or 
tennis, or track for that matter'.' 

I am not preaching for feminism or 
anything that drastic, I just think it is time 
to level the playing field and extend con- 
gratulations to all the teams, male and 
female because each deserves some ink 
and works extremely hard to succeed. 



Monica Schallert 

Sophomore 

Regal Softball Team Member 



Visit the Echo online 
at www.clunet.edu/echo 



Ladies and Gentlemen of the Echo: 

I read with interest Brett Rowland's 
commentary about the de facto censorship 
practiced by CBS in its decisions regarding 
what messages and images were permitted 
to be televised during the recent airing of the 
Super Bowl. I am familiar with network's 
stonewall against allowing to be shown a 
(paid) 30-second spot concerning the Bush 
trillion-dollar deficit and pondering its fiscal 
impact on future generations of Americans 
(a sobering thought, indeed). 

It is not only incomprehensible but 
inexcusable and intolerable for a commu- 
nications medium to ban from the public- 
airways a thought-provoking message 
while simultaneously fostering the culture 
of tasteless sexism that promoted the half- 
time flashing of an entertainer's body part. 
It has occurred to more than one American 
that deliberately not censoring a bare breast 
at half time (CBS management is reported 
to have approved this in advance!) may 
have been a deliberate attempt to distract 
attention from a much more important issue 
- the censorship of thoughts and ideas. As 
Americans, we should expect and demand 
better than this! 



Harry Domicone 
School of Business 



tEftCff ffiepe® 



Bret! Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moria Hams-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rineharl 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo. California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465: 
Fax (805) 493-3327: E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



(H3HJE ;E(S2JQE> 



February 11, 2004 



OPINION 



The Echo 9 



Jackson gives viewers an eyeful 



By Brandee Tecson 
Columnist 



First, it was the lass seen around the 
world: Britney Spears, the reigning Princess 
of Pop, and her idol. Madonna, swapping an 
open-mouthed kiss at the 2003 MTV Video 
Music Awards last August. Christina Aguilera 
was also involved in the menage a trois. The 
public display was a source of scandal for sev- 
eral weeks after the incident as Spears' repre- 
sentatives stepped in to do damage control on 
their client's tarnished "good-girl" image. 

However, not to be upstaged. Spears' 
ex-boyfriend, Justin Timberlake, shocked 
almost 90 million viewers when he exposed 
Janet Jackson's right breast during the Super 
Bowl halftime show on Feb. 1. It was the 
most watched Super Bowl halftime show in 
history. 

At the end of their duet together, while 
Timberlake crooned, "I'm gonna have you 
naked by the end of this song," he snatched 
off part of Jackson's bustier on stage, revealing 
her breast clad in a "sun-shaped nipple shield" 
In a flash, the lights went out, leaving millions 
of viewers wondering if they actually saw her 
breast. Well, truth is, they did. 

Immediately, the Federal Communications 
Commision was flooded with a slew of com- 
plaints regarding the exposure. Meanwhile, 
Timberlake and Jackson apologized for the 
stunt, claiming it was the result of a "wardrobe 
malfunction." 

However, Timberlake said in an interview 
to "Access Hollywood" right after the perfor- 
mance, "Hey, man, we love giving you all 
something to talk about." 

Jackson immediately denied that the 
incident was intentional. Well, let the he-said, 
she- said rebuttals begin. 



MTV, who produced the halftime 
show, claimed that they had no knowledge 
of Jackson's intentions. "The tearing of 
Janet Jackson's costume was unrehearsed, 
unplanned, completely unintentional and was 
inconsistent with assurances we had about the 
content of the performance." 

A few days later, Jackson confirmed those 
reports by issuing a statement of her own, 
claiming full responsibility for the indecent 
exposure. 

"I am really sorry if I offended anyone. 
That was truly not my intention," Jackson said 
in a video apology that was released to the 
media on Feb. 4. "MTV, CBS and the NFL 
had no knowledge of this whatsoever, and 
unfortunately, the whole thing went wrong in 
the end" 

Despite apologies, the NFL has said that it 
is unlikely that MTV will produce the halftime 
show again. 

Jackson's spokeswoman said that a red 
lace bra was supposed to remain in tact when 
Timberlake tore off her outer clothing. But 
questions still remain about Jackson's intent. 

As a result of the one second flash, the 
FCC has launched a full-blown investigation 
into whether the show violated decency laws 
or not. If fined, each CBS station could pay 
fines of up to $27, 500 each, with the total fine 
reaching into the millions. 

FCC Chairman Michael Powell called the 
act a "classless, crass and deplorable stunt." 

Federal indecency rules bar the broad- 
cast of obscene material and limit the airing 
of material that "contains sexual or excretory 
references in a patently offensive manner" to 
late-night hours when children are less likely 
to be watching. 

In addition, CBS said it will institute a 
video delay system to "avoid any recurrence" 



Day Ca mps seek Summer Staf f 

To work less than 20 minutes 

from CLU! Spend the most 

rewarding summer of your life 

outdoors working with children! 

You can earn $2800 - $3500 + 
Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



You don't 
pay tax 

Roth 

I R A 



This is the big attraction . 
a Roth IRA you don't pa) ta 
on qualified withdrawals, nc 
even on the earnings and tjain 
thai build up. 

You must follow certain rules 
such as Holding the Roth IRA fo 
5 years and reaching aye >9' ,. 

What's more, you < ap convcr 
many traditional IRA account 
to a Roth IRA. And you tai 
contribute to a Roth IRA al'tc: 
the age of 70' 




"I doubt that exposing 
herself in such a taste- 
less display that could 
forever tarnish her image 
... was her objective." 

Brandee Tecson 
Junior 

of similar incidents at the Grammy Awards on 
Sunday, Feb. 8. Janet is just the latest Jackson 
to be thrown into a full-blown media scandal. 
Her brother, Michael, is currently facing sev- 
eral charges of child molestation. So the ques- 
tion is, "why did Janet do it?" 

Some speculate that the incident was 
intended to throw Jackson back into the spot- 
light, after taking a two-year hiatus. Her last 
album, "All For You," was released in 2001. 
Ironically enough, her new single "Just a 
Little While" was released to radio only a few 
days before the Super Bowl. Her new album 
"Damita Jo" is set for a spring release. 

Others believe Jackson needed to do 
something huge to take the spotlight off of her 
brother Michael, who has been the focus of a 
media circus. 

However, according lo a technician who 
attended one of the final rehearsals, Jackson 
did intend to have some sort of clothing on 
underneath the rip-away bustier. 

David Spear, a consultant for the com- 
pany hired by MTV to produce pyrotechnics 
during halftime, said that Timberlake practiced 
removing Jackson's jacket, not exposing her 
breast, in rehearsals before Sunday's game. 

"That's not how it was rehearsed," Spear 



said. "It was clear that night there was going 
to be one scene where he would remove her 
jacket. The clear assumption was that she 
would have something on underneath." 

Truth be told, many people aren't buying 
it and say the singer apologized just to save 
face. Director Spike Lee has publicly criti- 
cized Jackson of her surprise breast-bearing 
incident, citing it as a "new low" of attention 
getting antics by entertainers. 

Lee. who spoke at Kent State University 
in Ohio on Feb. 3, said "there has been a 
decline in artistry," and nowadays, entertain- 
ers "have to do something extra" in order lo 
maintain popularity." 

"What's gonna be next?" Lee asked. 
"It's getting crazy, and it's all down to money. 
Money and fame." 

So what's the real story? Did Jackson 
intentionally flash millions just to boost record 
sales? Perhaps. Was there really a "wardrobe 
malfunction?" Could be. 

At this point, Jackson has fessed up and 
taken responsibility of the crass act, which 1 do 
believe went farther than originally intended. 
While Jackson did want to get the public's 
attention, I doubt that exposing herself in such 
a tasteless display that could forever tarnish 
her image and nsk losing a substantial fan 
base was her objective. 

Whatever the case may be, Jackson is 
again in the public eye. Her halftime show 
flash has become the most searched image 
in Internet history. Her popularity, or rather, 
notonety has gotten people talking about the 
singer once again. 

Nice job, Janet. 1 guess any publicity is 
good publicity. 



All 

California Lutheran University 

Students 




.y^ms^j- 



MANUSCRIPTS AKL NOW L1LINC ACCEPTLI ) FOR THE 
2U(M MARK VAN DOIUZN POETRY PRI/L 

Eligibility: Ml types an, Usui poetry .ue.... ■ i" il '■ 

I'ueim mini be i\pnl Oul »ti | pet page. 

Ileitis must lie itjpled it: up] i 



Number ofPoe 



iiiic and HO No inn I ippi u o h poemalu 

nil tli, ivord flu Mark Van II l"o II I'n 



I I.. Mi, i, 5 2UIM 



I 1 Ledbeller 
Engti.h Depart 

HUM 212 



io 



The Echo. 



SPORTS 



February 11, 2004 



Kingsm en back in four-way tie 



By Tawny Ingwaldson 
Sports Editor 

Closing out the week with one win 
and one loss, the California Lutheran 
men's basketball team is once again 
involved in a four-way tie for first place 
in the SCIAC. 

The Kingsmen traveled to Occidental 
College (13-6, 6-2), Wednesday, Feb. 4, 
only to come home defeated. 62-57. 

The Kingsmen 's foul trouble gave 
Occidental a good lead as they made 20 of 
their 26 free throw attempts. CLU made 
1 1 of their 1 7 attempts at the line. 

The victory for Occidental was det- 
rimental to the Kingsmens' lead in the 
SCIAC. "We'd be alone at first place if we 
hadn't have lost" said junior Ron Russ. 

"We went (to Occidental) with low . 
energy. We were coming off an up week, 
and 1 think that was a key factor in our 
loss," said Head Coach Rich Rider. "We 
are a team that has to play with a high 



energy level to be sucessful.' 

Senior Zareh Avedian was CLU's top 
scorer with 15 points, nine rebounds. Russ 
followed closely with 14 points. Junior 
Ryan Hodges had 1 1 points, six rebounds. 
The high scoring game against University 
of the Redlands (11-8, 3-5). Saturday, Feb. 
7, kept the Kingsmen 's home game win- 
ning streak at 11-0. 

"We worked on getting our bench 
involved again," said Rider. "We are going 
to take advantage of our depth." 

Avedian had a season high, 48 points, 
to land CLU their 115-107 win over the 
Bulldogs. He pulled down 15 rebounds, 
giving him a double double. 

Avedian 's previous game high was 
31 points against University of Mary 
earlier this season. He now holds the 
teams'season high scoring record, passing 
Ryan Hodges's 43 points. 

Junior Matt McCann also posted 
a double double with 17 points and ten 
rebounds. Russ scored 20 points. 



The loss against Occidental and 
victory over the Redlands has puts the 
Kingsmen among three other first place 
hopefuls. 

Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, Pomona- 
Pitzer, Occidental and CLU are all start- 
ing the week off with a 6-2 record. The 
Kingsmen host league opponent La Verne, 
Wednesday, Feb. 1 1 .. and need die win to 
keep diem in die running. 

"Against La Veme. we need to be 
mentally prepared and fired up with no 
holding back," Avedian said. 

"They are excellent shooters. I think 
it will come down to our energy level 
again," Rider said. 

Although the Leopards are not fight- 
ing for first, they still pose a threat to CLU. 
In the match-up between La Veme and 
front-runner Pomona-Pitzer, the Leopards 
slipped by with a 90-84 win. 

"They showed they can be a number 
one team," Russ said. "Every game is 
important from here on out." 




Photograph by Marybel Lopez 
Zareh Avedian looks down court for open 
teammates before passing the ball. 



Regals win three straight games 




ByAnf Hasan 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Dan Norton 

Senior Julie Cichon talks with teammate about how to get the ball 
down court during last week's basketball game. 



I Interested in 
mountain biking? 

Come join the 

Knights Cycling 

Team 



contact 
ehudson(5)clunet.edu 



The Regals basketball team defeated 
Caltech on Friday, Feb.6, 82-13, and has 
won three straight. Sophomore forward Katy 
Svennunesen contributed a double double 
leading the Regals in Friday's win scoring 1 1 
points and grabbing 10 rebounds. 

On Thursday, Feb. 5, the Regals took 
revenge, defeating UC Santa Cruz 84-70. 

"They beat us in double overtime Dec. 
2, so for us, this was a big game," said senior 
forward Julie Cichon. 

Junior guard Valerie Pina distributed 10 
assists and scored 1 8 points, leading the Regals 
against the Slugs. 

"We played a little bit more zone defense 
in this game, but I think our team focus and 
intensity got us through this game," Cichon 
said. 

"One of our goals this year was to not 
lose to the same team twice, so we were all 
focused for this one," said Head Coach Kristy 
Hopkins. 



"I think our team focus 
and intensity got us 
through this game." 



Julie Cichon 
Senior 

The 70-68 win over the Whittier Poets 
Wednesday, Feb. 4, was a close but important 
conference victory for the Regals. 

"Some of us were tired from last week, so 
it was important for us to keep our focus," said 
sophomore guard Alex Mallen. 

Sophomore Lauren Stroot led the Regals 
in scoring with 28 points, while Mallen had 14 
points of her own. 

With these three wins, the Regals improve 
to 9-10 overall and 5-3 in conference, placing 
them third in SCIAC. The Regals will face 
the first place Claremont Stags (16-3, 7-1) 
Tuesday, Feb. 10, at home. 



m 



Remember to 
register to uote! 



Two 

hearts 

captured forever.. .on 

film 

The 

Valentine 

Package 

Schedule an outdoor portaiture session for 

$100 and receive 36 proofs, a gift 

of two 5"x7" portraits of your 

favorite photograph and your negatives. 

For information or to schedule your session, please contact: 

Kristen Thebaud Portraiture 

'p. 805.276.6500 

e. kthebaud@earthlink.net 



®3HW 3E(H3J(6 



February 11, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 11 



Regals tennis beats former champs 



"it is too soon to be cel- 
ebrating since we just 
finished our first week of 
a hard 12 weeks ahead of 
us." 

Nancy Garrison 
Head Coach 





Senior Becca Hunau rushes across court to r eturn the volley. Hunau won both her singles and 

Number one doubles Becca Hunau and 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



Photograph courtesy of Kyle I aubath 

Junior Jen Hansen hopes for no return as 
she puts all her strength into her serve. 



The California Lutheran Regals tennis 
team began the season hosting and upsetting 
the Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (O-I, O-l) who 
are the current no. 7 team in the country. 

The Regals (2-0. l-O) came short of win- 
ning the SCIAC championship last year to the 
Sagehens by a small edge, but the 7-2 victory 
was a change in the plans for the Sagehens. 
Also, the Regals played die Westmont College 
Warriors, I -2 overall, on Feb. 7. and were 
triumphant by defeating the NAIA team by a 
score of 8- 1 . 

Number one singles, Becca Hunau, 
defeated her opponent 3-6, 7-6, 7-6. 



Jen Hansen defeated their opponents. 8-5. 

The only win for tile Warriors was against 
No. two singles Hansen. 

"I thought we did very well together as 
a team. Tennis is an individual sport, but we 
brought the team feeling to the matches. I am 
very happy for the team and also I am excited 
about our first and second consecutive win," 
senior Stephanie Perkins said. 

Another player for the Regals who had an 
enthusiastic outlook about the way the season 
is.going so far is junior Lisa Novajowsky. 

"We have a lot of depth this year and it 
is a definite possibility that we will take the 
SCIAC championship this year. We need 
to keep playing like we are at the moment 



Photograph courtesy ol Todd kugler 

doubles matches against Westmont College. 
and keep training to stay at this level," 
Novajowsky said. 

Head Coach Nancy Garrison was 
impressed with the matches that were played 
this last weekend. 

"I am very excited for the team this year. I 
honestly think that this is the best prepared ten- 
nis team that CLU has had in the last 1 years. 
This definitely showed against Pomona and 
Westmont, but it is too soon to be celebrating 
since we just finished our first week of a hard 
1 2 weeks ahead of us," Garrison said. 

The Regals will be playing away againsl 
the University of Redlands Bulldogs on 
Saturday, Feb. 1 4, for the second match of 
SCIAC conference. 



Baseball leaves with a 
win at Menlo Tourney 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen baseball team kicked off 
the season with a 2- 1 loss. 

Despite the loss, it was an exciting 
weekend for the baseball team as they trav- 
eled to their first tournament at Menlo in 
Adierton. Calif. 

The MenJo Tournament is an annual 
event The Kingsmen had some tough com- 
petition during the three days of the competi- 
tion. Their first game was on Friday, Feb. 6 
against Willamette, previously 1-0. 

The Kingsmen were neck-and-neck 
until the Bearcats scored a run in the ninth 
inning, beating the Kingsmen 3-2. This was 
the first game of the season for both teams. 
Junior catcher Mike Ceida smashed his first 
career home ntn. 

Junior pitcher Juan Vargas went 42 
scoreless innings and scattered five hits. 
Junior pitcher Doug Cametr pitched four 
relief innings and gave up the winning three 
runs. 

The Kingsmen played Westmont, then 
1-5, on Saturday. Feb. 7. 

It was a close game until the seventh 






inning, when the Kingsmen took off on a 
scoring spree, ending the game 12-3. 

Junior shortstop Clay Alarcon had four 
hits and a pair of RBIs. Junior second base- 
man Danny Chapparo went wo for four with 
four runs batted in. Junior pitcher Dominick 
Marci threw six innings, gave up only three 
runs on seven hits and struck out four to seal 
the win. 

The Kingsmen then took on the host of 
the tournament, Menlo, on Sunday, Feb. 8. 

The Kingsmen, now 1-2, and the Oaks, 
1-2, were close throughout the game, but 
Menlo came out with the win, beating the 
Kingsmen 5-4. 

Sophomore pitcher Matt Hirsh pitched 
6. 1 innings, gave up ten hits and the five win- 
ning runs. Chapparo and junior Chris Gosney 
each had doubles. Senior first baseman Mike 
Kaczowka had two lues and an RBI. 

"The team played well fliis weekend It 
was a good experience for all of us. We found 
what we need to work on and got the losses 
out of the way because we don't plan on los- 
ing again,'* Marci said. 

The Kingsmen will be traveling to 
Arizona this weekend to take part in the 
Arizona Desert Classic. 



Kingsmen tennis 
wins league opener 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



Visit the Echo online 
at www.clunet.edu/echo 



For the start of SClAG confer- 
ence play, the no. 12-ranked California 
Lutheran Kingsmen tennis team (1-1. 
1-0) faced the Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens 
(0-1, 0-1) on Friday, Feb. 6. 

The Kingsmen, coming from a 
loss last weekend to Cal Poly San Luis 
Obispo, were able to obtain their first win 
with a score of 5-2. 

California Lutheran University won 
die No. 2 and 3 doubles matches to win 
the doubles point. 

The only two losses for the team were 
no. 1 and 2 singles. 

"This was a really important game 
for us as a team, and we really came up 
strong. Everybody played to their full 
potential and we can be proud of our- 
selves. It's only our first SCIAC game 
and we need to maintain our level of 
play to win the SCIAC championship this 
year." sophomore Karlo Arapovich said. 

Arapovich. the No. 5 singles on the 
roster, was a starting freshman last year 
for the Kingsmen in their top nationally 
ranked team. 

Other players on the team also had a 
view on how things are going so far for 
the Kingsmen. 



"Everybody played to 
their full potential and 
we can be proud of our- 
selves." 



Karlo Arapovich 
Sophomore 

"Pomona is a good team, but we 
still have to face two bigger teams in 
tliis conference. Redlands (1-2. 1-0) and 
Claremont (1-2. 1-0), which can give us 
trouble in for the SCIAC championship." 
junior co-captain Qtiinn Caldaron said. 

Caldaron. who is a nationally ranked 
player, has significantly helped the 
Kingsmen tennis team in past seasons. 

Coach Mike Gennette was impressed 
by tile team's camaraderie. 

"The cohesion in the team is the 
best I've seen in my 10 years coaching 
at CLU. These guys are working u ith die 
team mentality and that is a terrific atti- 
tude. Bonding is a primary key in a teams 
success," Gennette said. 

The next game for CLU is against 
die Westmont College Warriors, who will 
host the Kingsmen on Wednesday, Feb. 
1 1, in Montecito, Calif. 



12 



The Echo- 



Sports Round-up 



SPORTS 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



Lacrosse 

The newly formed California Lutheran 
University lacrosse team made university his- 
tory last week when it took to the field to face 
off against Occidental. 

The Knights lost 16-1 to Occidental. The 
landslide victory was due in part to early inju- 
ries. Junior Chris Brumble was unconscious 
for 15 seconds and left the field in an ambu- 
lance. Doctors later said that Brumble suffered 
from a mild concussion. Senior RJ Key pulled 
his shoulder and was forced to leave the game 
early. Key and Brumble will both be returning 
to the field for the next game. 

"Our main goals for the season is to 
improve individually and to increase people's 
interest on the CLU campus," co-captain 
Bumble said. 

Freshman Steven Page scored the team's 
only point. 

Rugby 

It was a huge upset for the California 
Lutheran University's rugby team, which- 
played against Claremont on Saturday, Feb. 7. 



They fought long and hard, but were 
blown out by the Stags 41-0. 

"We hope as the season progresses that 
we begin to understand the game even more. 
We need to condition and work hard. We also 
hope that more people will come out and sup- 
port us," said Nate Fall, an ARC and CLU 
alumnus. 

Great effort was put forth by senior 
Jeremy Soiland, junior Micah Hamilton and 
freshman Ryan Smith. 

All of the players played extremely hard 
against Claremont and demonstrated great 
leadership skills. 

Track and Field 

Track and field had an open meet 
on Saturday, Feb. 7, at Cal State 
Northridge. 

An open meet means that any ath- 
lete can come out and compete in his or 
herspecialized events. The only athletes 
from CLU were the throwers. All the 
throwers improved their distances from 
last season. Each one increased in dis- 
tance by at least two yards. 

"This year we really want to step it 
up, especially for the seniors," sopho- 
more Adrian Cruz said. 



Kingsmen golf places 
third at tournament 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
golf team placed third out of six teams at the 
Redlands Best Ball tournament. 

First place went to the University of 
Redlands, second place went to the University 
of La Veme, Pomona-Pitzer finished fourth 
and Claremont College finished fifth. 

According to Head Coach Jeff Lindgren, 
each team at the Best Ball tournament consists 
of six players who are divided into pairs. The 
pairs are awarded the best (lowest) score for 
each hole, meaning that if one player gets the 
ball in the hole in five strokes and the other in 
four, the four is recorded instead of the five. 

The exception was Occidental, which did 
not have the six players to get a team score. 

The tournament does not count in CLU's 
standings, as it is a non-conference tourna- 
ment. 

"It's not really a pressure tournament," 
Lindgren said. "They can go out there and 
enjoy the course." 

CLU's three pairs consisted of senior 
Jordan Silvertrust and sophomore Peder 
Nyhus, junior Jason Poyser and freshman 
Christian Colunga, and freshman Nick Vemer 
and Brian Stanley. Silvertrust and Nyhus fin- 
ished the 72-par PGA of Southern California 
course at 70. Poyser and Colunga scored 73 
and Vemer and Stanley scored 74. 



"It seemed there's a lot 
of new talent. It should 
be a pretty competitive 
league this year." 



Jeff Lindgren 
Head Coach 

The course is located in Beaumont, 
Calif, which is situated between Redlands 
and Palm Springs. 

"I had a good time," Vemer said. "It was 
a good preseason tournament. It was good 
keeping in there with Redlands and La Veme. 
I'm just excited to get started and get into the 
conference matches." 

"It was a really good way to start the sea- 
son," Colunga said. "It was a little breezy, so 
the wind was kind of a factor, but it was nice. 
I did okay and my partners did well." 

Colunga said that the wind blew at 15-20 
mph. 

"It was a great start for our team," 
Lindgren said. "A lot of teams played their 
new members so they can get experience," 
he said. "It seemed there's a lot of new talent. 
It should be a pretty competitive league this 
year, I think. As far as new talent, I think we 
are pretty good; we have a great balance of 
kids who are returning and are new." 



Fox Sports 
with Jimmy Fox 

Wed. (31 10:30 



This week's guests: 
CLU Cheeiieading Team! 




Photograph by Kyle Peterson 

Nate tall molds being tackled as he attempts to dodge the next opponent in sight. 



This Week In Sports 



Today 

7:30 p.m. 

Hen's Basketball vs. La Veme 

Men's Tennis @Westment 

Tbursilav 
12:30 p.m. 

Mil's Bill vs. Wblttler 
(©Sterling Hills) 

Baseball ©George Fix 

Friday 
1:30 mt. 

Sittball vs. Vanguard (OH) 

Baseball @ ArUeoa Tournament 
Women's Basketball @ Redlands 
Saturday 

0:30 ML 

Hens Tennis vs. Redlands 



Mil's Basketball @ Ciltech 

Women's tennis @ Redlands 

Baseball @ Arizona Teurnament 

Sunday 

1p.m. 

lacrisse vs. Havward 

12:30 p.m. 

Women sTennls vs. UC Santa Cruz 

Baseball @ Arizona Tournament 

Mudiy 
Ho Sports 

Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. 
Women's Basketball vs. Occidental 



Hot Nights? Cool Trips? 
Killer Deals? 

This ain't tjour parents' travel agency... it's yours. 




California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 15 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


February 18, 2004 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Kingsmen basketball wins two, 
takes over first place. 


Career Center prepares to offer students tips 
on interviewing. 


Sexual Responsibility Week 
comes to CLU. 


See story page 7 


See story page 5 


See story page 3 



Students issue statements of candidacy 




I, Valerie VaNejos, am running for the 
position of Programs Board director. I have 
been in ASCLU-G and Programs Board for 
one year. I have gained a great deal of knowl- 
edge about how Programs Board should be 
handled as a result. I plan on continuing those 
Club Lu programs that have been a success in 
the past as well as working with the rest of 
Programs Board to implement new programs. 
I want to give students that are not in Programs 
Board the opportunity to share and give ideas 
about the events that they would enjoy going 



Valerie Vallejos 




Few people derive joy from a rousing 
Senate meeting. I do! Because of that enthu- 
siasm, along with my dedication and skills, 
I am confident that 1 can lead Senate to an 
excellent year. My experience has allowed me 
to master the workings of ASCLU Senate, and 
1 hope to use that knowledge and expand on 
it so as to benefit incoming senators and the 
greater student body. Senate is a very dynamic 
board, requiring a dynamic leader - — I am that 
leader. In life some things are black and white 
... make this decision Gray\ Vote Sarah Gray 
for Senate director. 



Sarah Gray 




I'm a sophomore at the Lu, 

Already I've seen it grow — 

I've seen wrestling at Club Lu (Red vs. Blue), 

I've seen the water polo team go. 

I've supported the Capital Campaign; 

With students, I've served the homeless; 

I've experienced academic gain; 

I've seen a smashed car, I confess. 

I've witnessed the naming of Mogen Hall, 

I've gone to frosh orientation twice. 

I've been on the winning east-side for dodge 

ball; 

I've seen the students — they're oh-so-nice. 

To help us continue to grow, as PB director I'll 

do my part, 

So vote for me — have a heart (a sweetheart)! 



Jason Soyster 



My name is lason Soyster and I want 
nothing else than to be your next ASCLU 
president But why should you vote for me? 
Aren't 1 just another self-serving, resume 
building, Student Life insider? No. In addi- 
tion to my involvement with ASCLU, I also 
dedicate huge amounts of time supporting 
North Campus, the drama department, and 
Residence Life. Still not convinced? Let my 
work speak for itself: 

• '02-'03 Sophomore senator 

• '03-'04 Senate director 

• "Now is the Tune" campaign speaker 

• Featured in six drama productions 

• Ambassador's Circle member 

• Omicron Delta Kappa member 
On Feb. 18 and 19 vote Soyster for RiflcJlClT't 

president 




Rachel Pensack- 




When you elect me to the position of 
Senate director, you can count on an ambi- 
tious, determined person who sincerely cares 
about making a difference. By inspiring 
senators to find the things about which they 
are passionate and encouraging them to be 
a catalyst for change, I feel I'll bring a fresh, 
invigorating attitude to the Executive Cabinet. 

Having served on Senate, I have a solid 
working knowledge of ASCLU. Additionally, 
I'm serving my third year as president of the 
GSA, where I've been charged with leading 
meetings and being a point of contact and 
reference for the club's members. 




I am running for president because after 
being involved in ASCLU-G for two years, I 
have found that I enjoy representing you and 
working with other students to make decisions 
that benefit you and the university. If elected, 
1 would encourage you to feel comfortable 
approaching me to express your concerns so 
that they are heard, which is my main goal, 
along with working to enhance school pride 
and recognizing student involvement. Know 
that I would work hard to support and repre- 
sent ASCLU-G, you and CLU in a positive 
way and commit myself to the responsibilities 
of the position. 



Nick Gordon 



Courtney Parks 




Election time: A time when you choose 
what candidate you want in office. Every year 
it is the same candidates with the same ideas 
and issues. This year, though, will be differ- 
ent because a candidate known as Jon, aka 
Jdogg, will be running. He may not have all 
the flashy ideas or all the promise that the other 
candidates have, because Jdogg believes in a 
campaign where he doesn't have to win off the 
voters with flashy promises or a campaign that 
isn't for the people. This is Jdogg's promise 
because he likes to run his program old school 
and keep it real 



Jon Riley 




Jen Ledesma 



To me, CLU's campuswide events are ; 
large part of what makes us such a family. The 
community shared here through campuswide 
programming is one of my favorite aspect! 
of CLU. I am running for Programs Boarc 
director because I am creative, responsible 
and determined; all things I trust other direc- 
tors to be. With over a year of programming 
experience, I am confident in my ability tr. 
take over the role of PB director. My promise 
is to motivate next year's programmers tc 
creatively program events that will enrich out 
CLU community. 



Photographs by Kyle Laubach and Kyle Petersor 



The Echo 



Calendar 



February 18, 2004 




today 

february 18 

College Democrats -Activism Week 

Worship 

Chapel 
10:10a.m. 

Kingsmen Basketball vs. ff | a f 
Whiltier College __J0'-£aS 
Gym (fiFl Elf 

7:30 p.m. 

Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chape] Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 



Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 





a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



thursday 



february 19 



Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Mogen Hall Lounge 

6 p.m. 

College Democrats Meeting 

Nygreen 2 

7 p.m. 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

Intramural Softball - Mandatory 
Captains Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
7 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 



friday 

february 20 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Club LU: Club Night 

City Nights in Camarillo 
9 p.m. 

Sunday 

february 22 



Intramural Softball 

Varsity Softball Field 
10 a.m. 







Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 





Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 

9 p.m. 



monday © 

february 23 



Black Student Union Meeting 

Mogen Hall Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCL U-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen I 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 






CALL FOR SENIOR COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 

The Student Life Committee is looking for Seniors to submit a commencement speech of two pages or four min- 
utes of speaking time with the idea of highlighting what makes the CLU experience worthwhile and unique. 
All submissions must be submitted to Leah Herner at herner@clunet.edu by March I st . 
Selected submissions will perform for the Student Life Committee and the committee will decide the speaker. 




om for Rent: In Moorpark. M/F. non-smoker, 
al plan and DSL available (extra) $o00/month 
If interested, page: 
(805) 378-6092 



Tutors Needed: S15-$18/hr. lo slarl. Teach onc-on-onc, in-home 
SAT I Malh and/or Verbal & Academic subjects in your area of 
expertise. Paid (raining. Flexible hours. Reliable transportation 
required Mail, fax, or email cover leuer and resume Include 
standardized lesl scores (SAT I/II, ORE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information (o: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; Los Angeles, C'A 90035 

or fax resume to: (310)282-6424 

or email resume to: instructorhiring6@aceeducatiou.com 



Homework Help: For high school student in Ox 
i week. S20/hr 

II interested, contact Cruz at 
(805)493-3219 



lrd : 



. Ono 



p Sale: A Se 



, 52" Sc 



en TV. In excellenl condiiion. Asking 



Parakeets Asking 

leres(ed, conlac( Carolline 

(805) 987-3453 



Classified 

ads can be 

aced on the 



page 



P I 

Calenda 

for a flat rate 
regardless of 
word count. 
Discount 
available for 
multiple-issue 
orders. Ads 
are subject 
to editing' for 
content and 
clarity. 

Call: 



French Club LACMA Excursion 



CS/DANC 

EXHIBITION CELEBRATES CREATIVE EXPLOSION IN 

EARLY 2 0TH-CENTURY THEATER 

Exhibition presents extremely rare costumes with many accompanying drawings by Erie as 

welt as costumes by artists Henri Matisse. Sonia Delaunay and others 

Join us Sunday. Feb. 22 nd , 

TO SEE THIS ACCLAIMED EXHIBITION 
MEET ON CAMPUS AT 1 1 AM, (CARPOOLING $5 W/ CLU ID) 

Contact Rachel for more info: 
428-3789 rhelfan@clunet.edu 



DISTRIBUTE BROCHURES 

Earn $375 to $560 a monlh working only 22 hours a month! Pref- 
erably Monday through Friday. Must be available after 2 p.m. 
For more Information, call: 
(866) 7 TUTORS 



Resume Writing 

Today. February 24. 2004 at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

This workshop will cover types of resumes and uses, resume format, con- 
tent, newest trends, using action verbs, presenting internship and volunteer 
experiences, and skills employers are looking for. We will touch on cover, 
reference, recommendation, and thank you letters. We will also be avail- 
able to answer questions on your resume. Bring what you have and join us. 



FREE SUPPORT 



GROUP 

for Eating Disorder Recoverers 

Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. in 
the F-Building 



Sponsored by the CLU 
Counseling Center and 
Marriage, Family Child 
Center, in conjunction with 
the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and 
Associated Disorders (ANAD). 

For more information, please feel 

free to call or email me or log onto 

hnp7/www.alrme net/sit e/ 

anarlwe h/ 

ANAD - National Association of 

Anorexia Nervosa and Associated 

Disorders 

Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW 
Ext: 3390 ccollett@clunet.edu 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800 -$3500+ for the sun- 
nier working with children outdoors! 

Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



Proactive Job Search 

Thursday. February 19. 2004 
at 5:30 p.m. (Nelson Room) 

Did you know that applying for jobs 
from newspaper ads and web listing 
is the most ineffective method for 
the job search? Develop tactics for 
apporaching employers and a strat- 
egy that will generate interviews. 
This workshop will cover a num- 
ber of proactive methods that will 
help you find the right job for you! 



**.., 



No appointment Netci tary ! 

CLU Itudcnt (upport fcrvUei 

OuettUmTT (SOS) 49S-U15 



f0 



r c Fill out tfio FAFSA 
with th& holf> of SSS/ 

tit FflFlft Worbihopi bealn Friday, January 10th 2004 and 

continue «wery Monday * Friday In February. 
All worbihop. arc from lOiOOam-tliOOam m Library Dm. T 



1 



Dont wait until the March 2nd deadline' 
The earlier you fill out your FAFSA the better chance you have o 
at much money o> you can for financial aid. 






CLU SEMESTER at 
RIMBACH, GERMANY 




Applications are now being 
received for a semester of study 
abroad atrhe Martin Luther Schule 
in Rimbach, Germany. This CLU 
program allows you to enroll at 
CLU, keep your financial aid, and 
spend a tiill semester as a student 
and teaching assistant at this 
distinguished German academy. 

Application forms are available 
from Drs. Walter Stewart and 
Paula Egnatchik in the German 
department or from Randy Toland, 
Humanities Secretary. The dead- 
line to apply for fall semester, 
2004 is Friday, March 12, 2004. 

for more information, please see Dr. 

Egnatcriik., Dr. Walter Stewart, or 

Dr. Herbert Goocri, 

Director of Study Abroad. 



Hjns jama© 



February 18, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 



Security making changes at CLU 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



"Security Alert!" seems to be a common 
term around campus these days. Every time 
a crime occurs. Department of Safety and 
Security sends out an e-mail to all students and 
faculty, notifying them of what happened and 
who to contact if they have any information 
on the situation. However. California Lutheran 
University students weren't always receiving 
these e-mails prior to this year. 

In years past. Security was not following 
the regulations of the "Clery Disclosure Act" 
that requires universities to make the records 
of campus and community crime available to 
anyone. 

This year, the campus has a new manager 
of campus safety, Klay Peterson. 

Peterson realized, when he came to CLU 
10 months ago, that the standards were not 
high enough. He has worked all year to make 
sure that all of the "Clery Disclosure Act" is 
being followed. Peterson said that the require- 
ments, which can. be viewed«on the Security 



Web site, are not hard to follow and that the 
fastest way to get information out to the stu- 
dent body is through e-mail. 

"The more information we can get 
out to the community, the safer we will be. 
Knowledge is power." Peterson said. 

This increase in notification about 
campus crime has caused some students and 
faculty members to worry that the university 
has higher crime rates. According to Peterson, 
many students have inquired about the fre- 
quency of the on-campus crime reports. 

According to CLU's daily security log, 
which can be viewed by anyone who wishes 
to see it, most of the crime rates are normal in 
comparison to last year. The only rate that is 
higher this year is burglary. Peterson said this 
is higher because of one student who was able 
to repeat his crime several times before he was 
apprehended. 

To Security, the important thing now is 
to get CLU standards of safety information 
higher, and then keep them high through the 
security alerts. 

Security has taken several steps to 
improve campus security. Some of these 



include taking a residence hall safety survey 
on campus, going on night walks to evaluate 
campus lighting and publishing crime preven- 
tion brochures. The brochures are free to CLU 
students. They can be picked up in the Student 
Union Building, Health and Counseling 
Services, the Residence Life office and the 
Womens Resource Center. 

Security has also started an on-campus 
escort system. There are several patrol cars 
around campus from 9 p.m.-l a.m., Monday 
through Friday, at ext. 3911. In addition, 
Peterson is working with the Residence Life 
office to put on safety and self-defense semi- 
nars. Lastly, the parking permit enforcement 
has helped security to identify cars and notice 
intruders. 

However, some students are not aware of 
the lengths the security office has gone to keep 
the campus safe. 

"CLU is a safe place, but I feel Security 
needs to step it up and report crimes to the 
cops," sophomore David Zacks said, unaware 
that the office must report all crimes on cam- 
pus to the police. 

Peterson said that soon the daily crime log 



will be available on the Web site. 

"I don't think the students are really told 
what Security does to keep us safe. It would 
be nice to know the measures they take. I 
think that would make more people feel safe," 
senior Gretchen Handloser said. 

Peterson agrees. 

"[Security] hasn't done enough to notify 
students of all that we are doing to increase 
safety and security on campus." Peterson said. 

There are some students who are starting 
to notice the changes being made. 

"I feel safe and i feel informed about 
safety measures. The e-mails they send about 
things that happen are very informative," 
sophomore Meggie Graves said. 

Many students, for the most part, seem 
to agree. 

"I feel very safe on campus no matter 
what time it is. I like that Security now puts 
out alerts and notification when something 
happens," junior Jason Soyster said. 

Students who would like more informa- 
tion on what is being done to make CLU safer 
may contact Peterson at the Department of 
Campus Safety and Security at ext. 3960. 



Boston's "On Point" coming live to KCLU 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



As KCLU's newest programming addi- 
tion in January 2005, WBUR's "On Point" 
news show, a live talk program and news- 
magazine, discusses national and international 
events, bringing further balance to local public 
radio in a different and provocative format. 

"KCLU is one of only two California 
stations carrying [On Point]," said KCLU 
Program Director Jim Rondeau. "Because the 
show is done live, it is more spontaneous than 
our other shows and offers a different feel than 
other things we run." 

'"On Point's' main selling point is that 
it is the only public radio program live in 
the evening. Others are news-oriented, but 
not live," said WBUR Manager of National 



Program Marketing Daron Manoogian. 

"They take a story that has been in the 
news and dissect it with experts. Listeners are 
encouraged to call in and give opinions and 
talk to the guests, or people can log on to the 
website and discuss issues in the web forum," 
Rondeau said. 

The program, which is distributed by 
WBUR. Boston's premiere news station, 
began after the September 1 1 crisis. 

"NPR approached WBUR to help pro- 
vide live coverage to their station because of 
the overwhelming demand for news during 
that time," Manoogian said. "It was supposed 
to last for two weeks, but WBUR decided that 
there was still a demand. Sept. 1 1 was not the 
end of international and world news events." 

The program's host, Tom Ashbrook, pro- 
vides an eclectic and interesting perspective 



for live talk radio. 

"[Ashbrook] has lots of experience and is 
well-traveled," Manoogian said. "His style is 
different than the usual public radio host. He 
really takes command of the show and focuses 
the conversations more than other hosts." 

According to the "On Point" Web site, 
Ashbrook, an award-winning journalist, spent 
ten years as a foreign correspondent in Asia 
and served as deputy managing editor of the 
Boston Globe. He has also worked as a dyna- 
miter in Alaska's oil fields and founded an 
Internet company. 

"Tom really tries hard to get all of the 
view points on air. His No. one goal is to pres- 
ent the widest range of opinions," Manoogian 
said. 

The 2-hour show, which covers the day's 
biggest news stories by mixing cultural topics 



and the latest news developments, encour- 
ages spirited discussion and debate of relevant 
national and world issues. 

"We decided to carry it because the show 
is similar to our local morning program 'Cross 
Talk.' It's a good balance for us. The morn- 
ing programming covers local issues and the 
evening covers the national and international." 
Rondeau said. 

'"On Point' is a very good program, "said 
KCLU General Manager Mary Olson. "It fits 
in with our mission, and it fits in with the qual- 
ity of programming that we bring to our listen- 
ers. It's a great addition" 

"On Point" airs on KCLU's 88.3 FM 
from II p.m.-l a.m. PST Students who 
are interested in more information may 
contact Jim Rondeau at ext. 3473 or visit 
www.onpointradio.com. 



Sexual Responsibility Week heightens awareness 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



The Residence Hall Association and 
Student Life helped California Lutheran 
University students learn ways to be sexu- 
ally responsible during their annual Sexual 
Responsibility Week, entitled "Love Lines." 
Events were held throughout the week of Feb. 
9-13. 

The main focus was to show students 
how the decisions that they make can affect 
their future. RHA planned a number of differ- 
ent events throughout the week focusing on a 
number of different issues related to sexual 
responsibility. 

"It definitely made an impact on people 
considering every time you turned around, 
there was some poster or picture up in rela- 
tion to sexual responsibility. Although some 
people were making jokes about it, 1 bet 
everyone benefited from it," freshman Lizzy 
Cullip said. 

On Tuesday, latex gloves with facts about 
sex were spread through various places around 
campus. 

"The latex glove [idea] was clever, but 
also distracting. It brought up more jokes than 
actual people finding it informative," sopho- 
more Katrina Wong said. 



CLU Director of the dept. of safety and 
security Klay Peterson met with students on 
Tuesday in the Humanities lobby for a discus- 
sion called "Sex Lines." He talked with stu- 
dents about the ways in which one represents 
themself and how it helps people define their 
sexual choices and, as a result, helps reduce 
the possible risk of being the victim of sexual 
assault 

The following day, students went to the 
plounge and Mogen Hall lounge for "Sex in 
the Lounge." Students had their questions on 
sex and relationships answered by the depart- 
ment of Health and Counseling Services as 
well as Campus Ministries. 

"1 thought the promotion of abstinence 
was a good message, but the way they went 
about it was not the best. I think that saying 
that one's peers are being abstinent is smart, 
but where did they get their facts? There is no 
real way for us to know that it isn't completely 
made up because the people I know are not 
practicing abstinence," Wong said. 

The big events of the week were "Battle 
of the Sexes" and "The Dating Game" at 
The Need. The audience was treated to free 
cheesecake from The Cheesecake Factory as 
they watched the games. 

In the "Battle of the Sexes," three teams 
of women and three teams of men competed 




Dating Game contestants take questions from the mystery bachelor. 



for a grand prize of $500. Each team had to 
answer questions about sex and were elimi- 
nated if they answered incorrectly. In-between 
rounds of "Battle of the Sexes," senior Jimmy 
Fox hosted "The Dating Game." 



"I found it very entertaining. There was a 
lot of uncalled for audience participation that 
added to the fun. I got to hear constant sexual 
innuendo while eating free cheesecake," junior 
Tony Chiaramonte said. 



The Echo 



FEATURES 



February 18, 2004 



What do you think about campus dining? 




Chris Mazza, biology. 2004 



Deanna Dean, marketing, 2004 



Johanna McDonald, sociology/religion, 2004 Matt Kugler, communication, 2004 



"I've never seen so many nice Latinas in "I like trying to guess who is walking "If you have special nutrition needs, "If you don't have a meal plan, it's easy 

one place at one time." down the stairs into the Caf by the shape of Martin is willing to work it out with you." to sneak through the back door." 

their legs." 




Billy Proctor, communication. 2004 



Mady Stacy, psychology, 2005 



Colin Cassuto, liberal studies, 2004 



Carly Sandell, liberal studies, 2005 



"I like Coke better than Pepsi, and they " tt has "" abundance of pre-made food." .^ Centmm is quick wi e asy between "I really like the breakfast. The omelets 

have that." classes." and Belgian waffles are yummy " 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography by Bell Lopez. 



Game 'FFX-2' is time consuming but suprisingly good 



By Matthew Berner 
Stai-t Writer 



Few will ever forget the majestic 
moment in an RPG (role-playing game) 
that turned their video-gaming experi- 
ence into something unique. Whether it 
was Zidane's miraculous return to Garnet 
after he had been presumed dead or Aeries' 
willingness to give up her life after you had 
almost taken hers, such tragic and joyful 
anecdotes have been the means by which 
the Final Fantasy franchise has become 
what it is today. While some things have 
remained consistent throughout the games, 
never before have any two Final Fantasies 
taken place in the same world. This added 
element has given the game a certain 
versatility and freedom that other Final 
Fantasy's are hard-pressed to match. 

For those who never got around to 
playing the original FFX, here is your 
chance to understand what's going 
on. Pending the deliverance of Spira 
and the Defeat of the notorious monster 
known as Sin. Tidus would cease to exist. 
Hence the reason for a sequel. After find- 
ing a short movie sphere of what appears 
to be Tidus shouting for help, Yuna and 
her friends begin their joumey. It's been 
two years since the destruction of Sin and 
the disappearance of Tidus, yet Yuna has 
refused to give up hope and her memory 
of him. Journeying as High Summoner, the 
player. Yuna and her party, consisting of 
her former guardian Rikku and new friend 
Pain, venture out in hopes of finding 
excitement, treasure and a chance to see 
Yuna's true love once more. 

With entirely revamped battle, class 
and leveling systems, FFX-2 blows away 



its competition as well as the hopeless- 
to-complete sphere leveling found in 
FFX. While FFX-2 returns to the clas- 
sic experience-based leveling, the actual 
stat manipulation is applied through the 
assignment of "Dress Spheres" (a.k.a. 
Classes). Whether carrying a colossal 
sword as a samurai, casting status ail- 
ments in the form of song as a songstress 
or equipping twin daggers and stealing 
from your foes as a thief, the most effec- 
tive party results from intentional use of 
their abilities. Fortunately, for those who 
put forth the effort in assigning compli- 
mentary classes, the game's revised ATB 
(Active Time Battle) system allows for 
well-timed attacks to interrupt their foes. 
Actions also increase damage through the 
use of combos. 

Considering the astonishing success 
rate of independent and completely linear 
Final Fantasies, the numerous changes 
found throughout the game surprise even 
me. However, based upon the decisions 
you make and side quests you complete, 
FFX-2 branches off from the conventional 
story structure, allowing the player to 
determine any of five different endings. 
After completing the game, a new game 
can be started, allowing you to keep abili- 
ties and items using the new-game plus 
mode (a God-send of an installment to the 
Final Fantasy Series). 

Most surprising of all is the general 
tone of the game. All seriousness put aside, 
FFX-2 features mostly pop-style music as 
well as some interesting voice actors. The 
voice acting found throughout the game 
puts most others to shame, with exception 
of brother, assuredly the most eccentric 
and annoying character in existence. Yet, 
throughout the game, Yuna, Rikku and 



Pain act their roles quite differently from 
what one would come to expect from the 
destroyers of the monster Sin. As playful 
as can be, the FFX-2 girls are quite often 
found discussing the next sphere hunt or 
emulating stances and routines that would 
be expected in a "Charlie's Angels" film. 

Has the Final Fantasy franchise 
reached a point where the games are able 
to ride on the title alone? Most assuredly 
they could; however, never have I seen 
the Final Fantasy title on an undeserving 
game. Any who are willing to devote the 
40 hours necessary to conquer an RPG will 
admit that the Final Fantasy series, includ- 
ing FFX-2, continues to raise the bar as to 
what the genre is capable of doing. 



Visit the Echo 

online at: 

www.clunet.edu/ 

echo 



<A "Beautiful Look 

Pull-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805)492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

J 1 1 n Avenue dc Los Arbnlcs in Thousand Oaks 
Near Rile Aid anil Whole Foods 



Wm ?cp® 



February 18, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 



Resources for the sexually responsible CLU student 



By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writer 



The old admonishment, "don't do it; and 
if you do, don't get caught," is something of 
the past when it comes to sexual responsibility. 
One issue in, the past was pregnancy preven- 
tion or family planning. Today students have 
an array of support services focusing on sexual 
health and sexual responsibility. 

California Lutheran University's Health 
and Counseling Services offers students a wide 
range of sexual health services and contracep- 
tives. Confidential HIV and pregnancy tests 
are offered at low prices, Durex and Trojan 
condoms can be purchased at six for $1, and 
birth control pills and the morning-after pill 



BSU celebrates 
Black History 
Month 



By Yuri Perez 
Staff Writer 

This semester, the Black Student Union 
has several events planned in honor of Black 
History Month. Each week, fliers will be 
posted on the doors of residence halls in trib- 
ute to individuals who have made a difference 
in the African community. The information on 
the fliers will be part of the black history super 
quiz that will take place today at 6 p.m. in the 
SUB. 

The event will host two student teams 
going head-to-head. The winning team will 
then move on to compete with participating 
faculty and administration on Feb. 24 in the 
SUB. Professor Freeland, head of the politi- 
cal science department, will be one of faculty 
members supporting the black history super 
quiz. Other upcoming events include guest 
speaker Ron Paris, who will be giving a lec- 
ture on civil rights and music on Feb. 19 in the 
Nelson Room at 10 a.m. 

A workshop titled, "I'm Black, I'm Proud, 
but I'm Still Angry" will be held on Feb. 25 
in Mogen Hall at 5:15 p.m. The workshop is 
designed to help students deal with angry feel- 
ings. Also, Rhythm 101 dance lessons will be 
scheduled on Feb. 26 at the flag pole. The time 
is yet to be announced. 

"[BSU offers CLU students] a chance 
to get together and to present their culture on 
campus ... to support each other [in] culturally 
specific fun," said Juanita Pryor Hall, adviser 
to the BSU and head of Multicultural and 
International Programs. 

Approximately 35 members are in the 
Black Student Union, with meetings showing 
an average turnout of about 15-22 students. 

Marcus Green, the newly elected presi- 
dent of the Black Student Union, said that 
being president is a lot of work and a challeng- 
ingjob, but has been good so far. 

"[BSU is] a place to gain cultural aware- 
ness ... a place where students can get together. 
It offers an opportunity to discover different 
aspects of campus and helps people to not 
be as sheltered as before they came to CLU," 
Green said. 

Other BSU officers include Derek 
Rogers, vice president; Janet Meeks, secretary 
and Mike Alexander, treasurer. 

"[You get to] know other people in school 
who share the same views; it provides a sense 
of comfort [and] you learn new things about 
different people." Rogers said. 

Meetings take place Mondays at 5:15 
p.m. in the Mogen Hall lounge. For more 
information, contact Pryor Hall at xJ95 1 . 



are also distributed. If students want to discuss 
sexual issues, CLU's Health and Counseling 
Services can supply the answers. 

"All conversations we have with students 
are completely confidential," said Nurse 
Lucille Ballard. 

According to the American College 
Health Association, "roughly 8 out of 10 sexu- 
ally active college students report that either 
they or their partner used contraception (birth 
control pills, condoms, withdrawal, or some 
other method) to prevent pregnancy the last 
time they had intercourse." 

CLU's Sexual Responsibility Week was 
held Feb. 9-13 and offered many programs, 
including information on the prevention of 
sexually transmitted diseases, appropriate rela- 
tionship behavior and protection against sexual 



assault A part of CLU's Sexual Responsibility 
week was "Sex in the Lounge." In this open 
forum, students were invited to ask questions 
about sex and relationships of an expert from 
Health and Counseling Services and Campus 
Ministries. 

"This event hopes to support some of the 
values of a sexually responsible college stu- 
dent," said Director of Health and Counseling 
Services Kristin McRae. 

Past teachings about student sexual 
responsibility often didn't go any further than 
recommending celibacy. 

Dr. Beverly Merrill Kelley lectures on 
sexual identity as part of her interpersonal 
communication course. 

"In my day we didn't have co-ed living 
halls. We didn't even have a boy in our room," 



she said. 

Sexual expression on college campuses 
"is becoming more open," according to the 
National College Health Assessment. "Not 
only do students appear more open in their atti- 
tudes, their behaviors are more openly varied 
then they once ware, encompassing celibacy 
as well as heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, 
and transsexual relationships." 

Those who choose to be sexually active 
face the challenge of protecting themselves 
from unwanted pregnancy and sexually 
transmitted diseases. Events such as Sexual 
Responsibility Week and services such as the 
Health and Counseling Services are on cam- 
pus to help. 



Interview and job tips for CLU students 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



With summer four months away and 
a graduating class leaving sooner than 
that, now is a good time to brush up on 
job interview skills. The first thing to 
consider is the first impression one makes 
at the interview. 

For interview clothes. Director of 
Career Services Cindy Lewis recom- 
mends Sears, Penny's, Ross or KOHLS 
for students on a budget. 

"A dark suit, collared shirt, pants or a 
skirt. Nice closed shoes and not too much 
make-up, cologne or perfume," she said. 
"No crazy jewelry. Take out piercings, 
and no loud scarfs or socks." 

Other interviewing recommendations 
include bringing a pen. 

"I can't stand it when applicants ask 
for a pen," said Cathryn Marchesano, 
assistant manager in charge of hiring at 
Hot Topic in the Oaks Mall. "It shows 
that they are completely unprepared and 
not really interested in the job." 

Employees need to convince the 
interviewer that they are a good catch, 
advised Ron Fry in his book, "101 Great 
Answers to the Toughest Interview 
Questions." Fry recommends finding out 
about the company and the position to 
which one is applying. He also advises 




lotographs by Bell Lopez. 
Student Angela Fentiman pos,es in casual CL Li attire and clothes that are suitable for a 



job interview. 

prospective employees to demonstrate 
experience, humility and confidence. Fry 
recommends that job applicants avoid 
defensiveness, negativity toward former 
employers and lying on one's resume. He 
also recommends not asking the wrong 
questions and not losing focus or eye 
contact. 

For more information, students can 



attend "Interviewing for Offers," an hour- 
and-a-half long presentation in Overton 
Hall. The workshop will prepare students 
for interviews by focusing on how to 
handle questions and how to sell them- 
selves. The event will also include mock 
interviews, career portfolios and how to 
close the interview. The workshop will be 
held Tuesday, March 2, at 5:30 p.m. 



Dakona's "Perfect Change" is a perfect hit 



By Kristina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



An album full of future modem rock hits 
seems to be the destiny of Dakona's first U.S. 
recording, "Perfect Change." The Vancouver- 
based band has already shown Canada it has 
what it takes in the music biz. Last year, the 
Canadian-based music magazine "Access" 
named Dakona fourth on the list of top 10 
Canadian artists to watch and described it as 
a "melodic rock band with strong songs and a 
charismatic lead singer." 

The up-and-coming band came together 
six years ago, beginning with cousins Ryan 
McAllister (lead vocals, guitars and key- 
boards) and John Biondolillo (drums and 
percussion). They teamed up with friends 
Shane Dueck (bass, vocals and keyboard) and 
Brook Winstanley (guitar). Over the next few 
years the foursome worked in a bam-turned- 
rehearsal space, where they eventually found 
a sound unique to them. After releasing two 
albums independently to rave reviews and 
much popularity, they began to gamer a lot 
of interest from record companies Eventually 



they chose Maverick Recording Company. 
The band found magic with the help of 
Grammy winning producer Rob Cavallo and, 
after just 18 days in the studio, they nailed 
"Perfect Change." 

Every one of the 13 songs was written or 
co-written by lead singer McAllister, and all 
are worthwhile to listen to. The only flaw is 
that some have the same sound and are hard 
to differentiate from each other. It is true that 
an album needs to fit into a category, but there 
could have been more variety. 

A few tracks stand out more than the 
others, beginning with the song "Revelation." 
The song deals with asking for guidance 
about deciding between what one wants and 
what one should do. In the chorus. McAllister 
croons, "Gonna give it up, I think I've had 
enough. I'm praying for a revelation. Could 
you set me free, 'cause this is killing me, I'm 
begging for a revelation." The words are deep 
and meaningful, and the mix of the guitar, 
drums and electric guitar meshes well. 

"Good (I've Got A Lot To Learn,)" the 
first single off "Perfect Change;" is one of 
the most upbeat tracks on the album. It is a 



plea from a man to a woman to teach him 
what he doesn't know about love. This song 
is more pop-rock than the other songs on the 
album and is very catchy and rhythmical. 
"The Richest Man" and "In God's Name" 
both address flaws in society; economic and 
religious. Both successfully show Dakona's 
talent to combine free speech with music. 
"Beautiful Thing" is a softer track that dis- 
plays McAllister's vocal skills in a harmoni- 
ous blend with the drums and the guitar. The 
title track "Perfect Change" closes out the 
album with a slower song about not taking for 
granted "a beautiful place, this beautiful space, 
your beautiful face." The electric guitar is 
emphasized in this radio-friendly song, along 
with most of the other tracks on the album. 

Overall, Dakona makes a great impres- 
sion with "Perfect Change." Along with good 
vocal skills and talented musicians, it has 
strong writing. Not only that, but many of 
their songs are actually meaningful, which is 
not so common these days. With a loyal fol- 
lowing in Canada and Seattle already, Dakona 
has great prospects for continued success in 
the near future. 



ai3SE tiCHol 



The Echo 



OPINION 



February 18, 2004 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 



Gov't can be improved 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



' 7 belie\>e that all government is evil, and 
that Dying to imp/we it is largely a waste of 
lime. " 

-H.L. Mencken 

The most exciting event this year is 
likely to be the 2004 Presidential election. 
From here, it looks like John Kerry will take 
on incumbent-President George W. Bush. It's 
too bad we don't have a third-party candidate 



running this year to heighten the drama. But, 
these are strange times and anything could 
happen. Both Republicans and Democrats can 
feel the fear. Republicans know that if Bush 
is re-elected, Hillary Clinton will probably run 
in 2008. 

Last week I talked to a dedicated 
Republican who recently donated to the Kerry 
campaign, because of the "brain-paralyz- 
ing prospect of Hillary Clinton in the White 
House." Let us explore the gnm scenario 
of Hillary becoming the Leader of the Free 
World. If she were elected, it would mean 
that Slick Willie would become the First 
Gentleman of the nation. 

That fact alone is enough to bring tears 
to the eyes of most Republicans, but it just 
makes me laugh. And I'm sure James Carville 
would descend into throes of delirium marked 
by fits of hyena-like cackling at the thought of 
Billy whooping it up with a whole new crew 
of White House interns. The Lincoln Bedroom 
would never be the same after that. 



Democrats are womed that the nch-kid 
from Texas will have four more years to bank- 
rupt the nation, brutalize criminals and ruin 
the environment. I'm worried that one day I'll 
begin to take Mencken seriously. But, for now. 
I'm young and naive and idealistic: I believe 
that my vote counts. 

Enough about national politics, I've 
exhausted myself on such affairs for this 
week. Let me lake this opportunity to encour- 
age every CLU student to vote in the ASCLU 
executive cabinet elections today and tomor- 
row. I urge you to make your vole an informed 
one. 

Don't let a poster or a piece of candy 
sway your vole. Vole for the candidate you 
think will do the most to improve our school. If 
a candidate knocks on your door with a piece 
of candy, ask questions! Find out how they 
voted on past issues of importance and how 
ihey plan to make CLU a better place for you. 

Questions or comments? E-mail me at 
echo(a>c lunet.edu. 



New details about King of Pop 




By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



The March 2004 issue of Vanity Fair, 
available on newsstands now, contains sev- 
eral radical revelations published in relation 
to the current molestation case against singer 
Michael Jackson. 

One of lhe*biggest bombshells concerns 
Jackson's alcohol consumption. According to 
the article, Jackson routinely drank wine and 
alcohol out of soda cans. The singer report- 
edly called the drink "Jesus Juice" and "Jesus 
Blood" to correlate with white wine and red 
wine. 

Jackson's accuser claims that Jackson had 
given him wine to drink several times, includ- 
ing once during a flight from Florida to Los 
Angeles, right in front of the child's unsuspect- 
ing mother. 

Jackson's former business adviser, 
Myung-Ho Lee, is quoted as saying all the 
children around Jackson knew about Jesus 
Juice. Jackson reportedly told them, "Jesus 



drank it, so it must be good." 

Maureen Orth, the article's author, 
brought to light several more claims against 
the King of Pop, including reports that the 
police were given drawings of Jackson's 
genitalia by his accuser and that the boy's 
younger brother witnessed some of the sexual 
abuse. The two were reportedly given Jesus 
Juice and antihistamine pills to relax them 
and shown pornography from the Internet and 
magazines. Along these lines, in an interview 
for "Court TV," Bill Dwaren, an investigator 
from the 1993 case, revealed that he found a 
book containing photographs of naked boys in 
Jackson's bedroom. 

"That in itself is not illegal," Gwaren said. 
"But we do know that many limes pedophiles 
use this type of material to lower the inhibi- 
tions of the child." 

Orth also claimed in the article that 
Jackson's ex-wife Debbie Rowe is the surro- 
gate, not biological, mother of Pnnce Michael 
I and Paris. 

Compare this to earlier unconfirmed 
reports that Rowe was artificially insemi- 
nated and that the children are not Jackson's 
biological children, but rather the products 
of an anonymous sperm donor. Lee said that 
Rowe threatened to go to the press and expose 
Jackson's secrets unless she was paid at least 
S8 million. 

Rowe has yet to comment on that, and her 
silence seems to be fueling more speculation. 
Did Michael father those kids'? Personally, I 



find it hard to believe that a black man fathered 
two blond-haired, blue-eyed children. 

Orth's story cites anonymous sources, 
and in some cases makes claims with no attri- 
bution at all. But the magazine issued a brief 
statement of support: "Vanity Fair stands by 
Maureen Orth's Michael Jackson story. The 
article underwent rigorous fact-checking and 
legal vetting, as do all Vanity Fair articles prior 
to publication." 

In contrast, Jackson family spokesman 
Firpo Carr told journalists outside the Jackson 
clan's home in Los Angeles that the allegations 
in March issue were "outrageous, inaccurate 
and baseless." 

"The family is outraged and justifiably 
so," he said. "We find it cunous that this 
article appears when Michael's legal team 
cannot, because of a gag order, respond to this 
irresponsible yellow journalism." 

While his legal team may not be able to 
respond to the new allegations, I find it cunous 
that more personal friends and family are not 
speaking out publicly in defense of Jackson. 
Although brother Jerome, sister LaToya and 
several other immediate family members have 
vehemently said these accusations are untrue, 
Michael's sister Janet, who recently was thrust 
into her own scandal, has remained mum on 
the issue. 

Jackson's supporters in Hollywood appear 
to be dwindling, as does his once-supreme fan 
base. For the most part, the silence in this case 
is deafening. 



jjjggjt ffiqiffC® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yyette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Hom 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand 
Oaks. CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



February 18, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Week of winning puts Kingsmen 
on top of the league once again 





Photograph courtesy of Dan Norton 
Senior Zareh Avedian jumps over his defenders, add- 
ing two more points to the scoreboard. 
By Tawny Ingwaldson 
Sports Editor 



Another week of winning puts the 
California Lutheran University Kingsmen ( 1 7- 



Lookingjor help, junior Ron Russ waits to find an open 
win against the La Verne Leopards. Wednesday, Feb. II 
4, 8-2) back on top of the league, leaving the 
other three contenders to battle for second. 

With two more wins against the La Verne 
Leopards {11-10, 3-7) and the Caltech Beavers 
(0-20, 0-10) under their belts, the men's bas- 
ketball team is proving a force to be reckoned 
with. 

The Kingsmen hosted La Verne 
Wednesday, Feb. 11, in the CLU gymnasium. 
Although the Leopards were not in the running 



Photograph courtesy of Dan Norton 
player down court. Russ added II points to the 76-70 

for first, they still posed a threat to the team. 
They had previously defeated Pomona-Pitzer 
(14-7, 7-3), who was involved in the four-way 
tie for first. 

"Everyone is fighting for their place 
in the conference," said Assistant Coach 
Brendan Garrett. "Everyone is trying to knock 
somebody off the top." 

The Kingsmen had a comfortable lead in 
the last few minutes of play and were not wor- 



ned when one of La Verne's players hit a shot 
at the buzzer ending the game 76-70. 

The Kingsmen 's six-point lead (38-32) 
at the half led to their victory as both teams 
scored 38 points in the second half. 

The Kingsmen always anticipate a close 
game. "Any team is beatable on any given 
night," Garrett said. 

Senior Zareh Avedian, SCIAC Athlete 
of the Week due to high scoring and com- 
ing in clutch against the Redlands, scored a 
game-high 29 points with four boards. Junior 
Matt McCann followed with 13 points, five 
rebounds. Junior Ron Russ had 1 1 points, and 
sophomore Alex Minney had a game-high 
nine rebounds and added nine points to the 
board. 

Avedian made 1 1 of his 20 field goal 
attempts and he went six of eight from the 
free-throw line. Both McCann and Minney 
were five of seven at the line, and McCann 
was a perfect 4-4 from the floor. 

Saturday, Feb. 14, was a blow-out game 
for the Kingsmen as they demolished the 
Caltech Beavers on their own turf, 92-47. 

Although the Kingsmen's next oppo- 
nent's, the Whittier Poets', record (11-10, 
4-6) does not seem to pose a threat, the team 
remains focused. 

"We have a lot more riding on this season 
than they do," said senior Logan Sleinhauer. 
"They will spoil our season if they beat us." 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff " 
To work less than 10 minutes from CLU! 
Spend the most rewarding summer of your 
life outdoors working with children! 

You can earn $2800-$3500 + 
Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 




You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 



Bum 

Cheap Fares? Budget Hotels? 
Advisors Who Get It? 



This ain't your parents' travel agency... it's yours. 




BOOK IT BEFORE THE THRILL IS GONE. 



TRAVEL 



CSUN 
7280 Melrose Ave. Macador BooksCore Complex 

(323) 934 8722 mi " Nordopp st. 

(818) 882.4692 



' | www.statravel.com" 



on THE PHOnE 



on cnmpu/ 



On THE /TREE 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ B.A. I iberal Studies for paracducators 

■ M. I d. leachcr Preparation 

■ M.S. Spe< i.il I ducation 

■ M. V i in i ii uliini & Instruction 

■ M.A. I du< arional Adn stration 

■ M.s. i ounseling and Gukl mi i 

■ Pupil Personnel Si 

■ ( allege Student Personnel 

■ F.d.D.l ilui itional I - idership 



* 






. ■ n 



You are invited 

Grad 




Hillil-HIU 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



Congratulations Zareh Avedian 

SCIAC 

Plaver of the Week 



. information 

. | 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angeles 
clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/Graduate 



vii^ajt jimflw 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



February 18, 2004 



Regals Softball leaves Vanguard with 
a win and loss in double-header 




Photograph courtesy of Kyle Peterson 
Sophomore outfielder Monica Schallert is safe at home, sliding past the Vanguard Lions 'catcher. 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The Regals Softball team improved to 
1-5 overall with a win and a loss versus the 
Vanguard Lions. 

The Regals won the first game of 
Friday's double-header at home, 3-2. Senior 
and outfielder Carrie Mitchell had two hits 
and one RBI. 

"The win is a huge step in the right 
direction for us," said Debbie Day, head 
coach and assistant athletics director. 
"We're playing against teams that are not 
Division III, and to be able to compete and 
defeat them is [a boost] to the morale of our 
team. I think we came out ready; our nerves 
were always on the edge in the first game, 
and that's what kept us more focused." 

"I was really happy that we won at 
least one of our games," junior Kellie 
Kocher said. "Any win over an NAIA team 
is a great win." 

The Regals lost the second game to the 
Lions, 3-5, despite a comeback in the later 



innings. 

"We were down quite a few runs in 
that game and we scored," Day said. "We 
had some people come back and hit a few 
runs. We just started hitting the ball better. 
We had very good base running, and that 
helped put us in scoring position." 

"It's kind of like a domino 
effect; when someone 
starts a rally, it's a lot 
easier for the rest of us 
to get going ... " 

Kellie Kocher 
Junior 

"We didn't like what was going on in 
the game and we got pumped up," Kocher 
said. "It's kind of like a domino effect; 
when someone starts a rally, it's a lot easier 
for the rest of us to get going with that." 

"In the first game, we came together 




Safe at second'. A Regal dives headfirst to beat the throw, 
against Vanguard Friday, Feb. li. 
and played really well," said freshman 
outfielder Monica Schallert. "We were out 
there [and] we had nothing to lose. But in 
the second game, I think we got ourselves 
into a hole. We had an awesome comeback 
in the last two innings, and we showed 
some personality as a ball club. We finally 
realized that we needed to step it up. On 
the whole of the day, we stepped it up and 
really showed some promise for this ball 
club." 

According to Day and Kocher, the 
Lions belong to the National Association 
of Intercollegiate Athletes, some of whose 
members offer athletic scholarships. 

Day and Kocher said that the experi- 
ence from the first six games this season 



Photograph courtesy of Kyle Peterson 

The Regals softball team went 1-1 in the double header 

will help the team when it faces the confer- 
ence teams. 

"Any time your team can come 
from behind and score runs, it shows a 
sense of spirit and a sense of fight," Day 
said. "We're going to need that down the 
road." 

The team plays its first conference 
game of the season at home this Saturday 
against the University of Redlands, which, 
according to Day, has a good program. 

"The last six games that we played 
and the two games we played today were 
against some of the hardest teams we'll 
play all season," Kocher said. "It helps 
bring us to a higher level of competition 
[against] the other conference teams." 



Action-packed weekend 
for Regals tennis team 



Kingsmen baseball finishes 
2-3 in Arizona Tournament 




Photograph courtesy of Slephanic Shaker 
Sophomore Blair Murphy warms up during practice 

for the match against UC Santa Cruz. 

By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 

Last weekend, the Regals tennis team 
faced a tough segment of its 12-week 
schedule. On February 14, they faced 



the University of Redlands Bulldogs 
away, and on February 15, they faced 
the University of California Santa Cruz 
Banana Slugs in Thousand Oaks. 

"We fought hard, but it was disap- 
pointing that they beat us. Redlands is a 
SCIAC team, and we want to do well in 
the conference this year. We know that we 
have a good chance to win conference," 
said Lisa Novajosky, who is the No. 3 
singles player in the roster of the Regals 
this year, commenting on the 4-5 loss 
against the Bulldogs. 

The next day, playing against the 
Slugs, the Regals were in control of the 
situation for the majority of the time. The 
Regals won two of the three doubles to 
put them ahead 2-1. The added wins by 
Novajosky, Blair Murphy and Stephanie 
Perkins gave the Regals an assured win 
against the Slugs. 

"We are doing well so far, but we 
are still not playing our best, which is 
exciting, because when we peak, we will 
bulldoze teams," said Murphy, the No. 4 
player for the Regals. 

The final score ended 5-4 in favor 
of the Regals. 

Head Coach Nancy Garrison was 
impressed with the performance of the 
girls this weekend. "We are a great team, 
but we will be an even greater team by 
the end of the season," Garrison said. 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen had a tough weekend as 
they went 2-3 in the Arizona Desert Classic in 
Chandler, Ariz. 

The competition was difficult during 
the four-day tournament. The Kingsmen's 
first game was on Thursday, Feb. 12, against 
George Fox, 3-0. 

The Kingsmen and the Bruins were close 
until four CLU errors led to five unearned 
runs. Three of these were scored in the fourth 
inning. 

Freshmen Johnnie Machado had an 
RBI triple and scored a run. Junior pitcher 
Dominick Macri took the loss for the 
Kingsmen, giving up four runs on five hits 
within three innings. 

"We had mental lapses. A lot of stuff 
happened that should have never happened. I 
believe that if we eliminate those mistakes, we 
will be fine," junior Roy Riley said. 

The Kingsmen then had a double header 
on Friday, Feb. 13, against the Whitman 
Missionaries (3-2) and the Whitworth Pirates. 
The Kingsmen split the two games, losing to 
Whitman but beating Whitworth. 

It was a close game between the 
Kingsmen and the Missionaries until the 
Missionaries won with a walk on two outs and 
bases loaded. CLU battled back in the seventh 



inning, but it was too late. The Kingsmen lost 
10-9. 

Junior Danny Chaparro hit in the lead-off 
spot and reached base five times. He was five 
for five for the day, with a walk and a hit by 
the pitcher. Freshman Nathan Cusick took the . 
loss for the Kingsmen. 

The team later that day played Whitworth. 
The Pirates took a beating, 10-0, at the hands 
of the Kingsmen. 

The Kingsmen had six hits, eight walks 
and two hit batters. Junior pitcher Juan Vargas 
scattered five hits and struck out 12 batters to 
get the win in a five-inning game. 

"We hit the ball really well and made 
good adjustments against the slow pitching. 
Our defense also played really well," said 
Macri. 

The Kingsmen then took on Pacific 
University (5-4) on Saturday, Feb. 14. The 
Kingsmen crushed Pacific, beating them 1 1 - 1 . 
The game was shortened to only five innings 
due to the 1 0-run rule. 

The Kingsmen, now 3-5 overall, took on 
Whitworth, Sunday, Feb. 15. The Kingsmen 
were in the lead, but in the end, they 
couldn't come though. The Kingsmen lost to 
Whitworth, 9-8. 

"We hit the ball really well today; the 
hitters came though," junior Jon Calmes said. 
"We still have things to work on, but it's still 
early in the season. There is time for us to 
improve, and we will." 



California Lutheran University 

Wat lEctm 



Volume 44 No. 16 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


February 25, 2004 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Senior Becky Sehenuk tallies 10 
service aces to break record. 


Second annual new music 
concert impresses. 


CLU changes GPA 
requirements. 


See story page 8 


See story page 6 


See story page 4 



Students elect 'o4-'os Executive Cabinet 



By Bretl Rowland 
Editor In Chief 



Junior Jason Soyster beat rival 
Courtney Parks to win the ASCLU-G 
presidency. Soyster won with a hefty 
margin over Parks in what Student Life 
officials are calling the largest voter turn- 
out in ASCLU history. Soyster received 
327 of the 546 total votes for ASCLU 
president, beating Parks by more than 100 
votes. 

The 546 votes account for only 28 
percent of the undergraduate population, 
which is far from a majority, but much 
higher than past years. Soyster will take 
office next Fall, but is already working 
with staff members to prepare. 

"The most important thing for the 
ASCLU president," Soyster said, "is to 
work behind the scenes with the Board of 
Regents to make student concerns heard, 
because [the Board of Regents] makes the 
big financial decisions." 



Soyster said he plans to focus next 
year's administration on important student 
issues such as the North Campus and new 
residence hall. He plans to continue his 
hard work to improve the cafeteria and 
campus dining services in general. 

Soyster said that he understands the 
importance of working closely with gov- 
ernment members as well as the student 
body at large. 

"I hope that I can keep being the pro- 
ductive listener I have been in the past," 
Soyster said. 

As the ASCLU-G president, Soyster 
will be working closely with Sarah Gray, 
the newly elected senate director Gray 
won with a solid margin over oppo- 
nent Nick Gordon, junior Gay-Straight 
Alliance president and At-Large Senator. 
Gray could not be reached for comment 
by press time. 

"IGray] packs a big punch and will 
be a great leader," said dance and social 
activities coordinator Katy Wilson 



"The most important 
thing ... is to work be- 
hind the scenes with the 
Board of Regents." 



Jason Soyster 
ASCLU President-elect 

In the highly contested race for 
Programs board director, no candidate 
was able to gather 50 percent of the vote 
needed for election on Thursday night. A 
run-off election between the top two can- 
didates, Rachel Pensack-Rinehart and Jen 
Ledesma, was held on Friday. Pensack- 
Rinehart narrowly beat Ledesma, 224 to 
173. 

"I want to make sure the voice and 
concerns of the student body as a whole 
are recognized," fensack-Rinehart said. 

All new executive cabincnt members 
will take office in Fall 2005. 




Photograph by Stephanie Shaker 
From top to bottom: Jason 
Soyster, Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 
and Sarah Gray 



Issue of same-sex marriage heating up 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



The ongoing debate in Massachusetts 
to allow same-sex marriages and the 
recent marriages in San Francisco of 
same-sex partners has drawn mixed emo-. 
tions from people all over the country. 

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial 
Court ruled nearly a month ago that cou- 
ples of the same sex had the same right 
as heterosexuals to get married, rather 
than permitting them only to form civil 
unions. 

Civil unions give couples a few of 
the rights to which married couples are 
entitled, but they do not provide fed- 
eral benefits such as Social Security. As a 
result of the ruling, Massachusetts could 
be the first state in the country to allow 
same-sex marriages. 

"As much as Massachusetts has 
always been a very liberal state, we've 
also always held a great deal of conserva- 
tive and puritanical ideals. A great deal of 
people in this state who think huge social 
programs are just dandy are recoiling at 
the idea of gays marrying," Massachusetts 
resident and Clark University sophomore 
Matt Holmes said. 

After the Massachusetts ruling, many 
same-sex couples around the country 
went to courthouses demanding to be 
maimed. They were turned away. 

"All people should be able to enjoy 
the rights given to all and those rights 
should not just be limited to some," CLU 



senior Saul Aguilar said. 

In a controversial move, San 
Francisco officials allowed same-sex 
couples to receive marriage licenses. To 
date, more. than 3,000 couples have been 
married in the San Francisco courthouse. 
It is the first city to openly support the 
marriages. 

"Same-sex marriages should be 
allowed in San Francisco. There is such 
a large gay community there that it just 

"I choose to support and 
love everyone while liv- 
ing love and loving life." 



Jared Clark 
Freshman 

makes sense. If two people are in love 
they should be able to get married regard- 
less of their sexual orientation. Marriage 
laws in this country are just not equally 
balanced," sophomore Lyssa Jacobsen 
said. 

Thirty-seven states have passed laws 
prohibiting gay marriages. 

"Most people are simply afraid of 
same-sex marriages. Being that it is a rel- 
atively new phenomenon, it can be com- 
pared to when interracial marriages were 
banned — people just were not ready 
for change. The gay rights movement 
appears to be the next civil rights move- 



ment for the gay community and those 
who feel they deserve the rights enjoyed 
by the rest of Americans," Aguilar said. 

According to Associated Press 
reports, in 1975 city clerks in Arizona and 
Colorado gave licenses to same-sex cou- 
ples that were later declared to be void. 

"I feel it should be called something 
different. In my mind, the marriage 
between a man and a woman is holy. 
However, I feel that if they are living 
together, they should have the same tax 
benefits that married couples can have," 
sophomore Rebecca Toll said. 

President Bush has openly declared 
that the recent ruling to allow same- 
sex marriages is "deeply troubling." 
Representative Carolyn Musgrave, a 
Republican from Colorado, is proposing 
a written amendment that would prohibit 
any state from recognizing same-sex mar- 
riages as legal. The amendment would 
only allow states to pass laws enabling 
civil unions and same-sex legal partner- 
ships. 

"I personally don't agree with same- 
sex marriages, but I also don't agree with 
decisions I make. Therefore, I choose to 
support and love everyone while living 
love and loving life because I know we 
are all God's loving children. I hope the 
U.S. can find peace in this whole issue 
of gay marriage," freshman Jared Clark 
said. 

As of press time, San Francisco 
officials said that the licenses they have 
issued are legally binding. According to 



the Associated Press, they have been 
revised to be "gender-neutral." It is still 
unclear as to whether or not the state 
will accept or void the mariages. 

As a result, the city of San 
Francisco filed a lawsuit against the 
State of California on Thursday, Feb. 
19. The suit is challenging the state's 
law that says that marriage is defined 
as being only between one man and one 
woman. 

The legislature will continue its 
debate of the proposed amendments to 
ban same-sex marriages on March 1 1 . 



Facts & Figures 



California law defines marriage 
as a union between man and 
woman. 

In the past 10 days, San Fran- 
cisco has issued marriage licens- 
es to 3,175 homosexual couples. 

Recent polls show that 50 per- 
cent of Califomians oppose gay 
marriage. 

Currently, 37 states have laws 
that prohibit gay marriage. 



3131? |iaJM® 



The Echo 



Calendar 



February 25, 2004 





today 

februarv 25 



Worship - Ash Wednesday 

Chapel 

10:10a.m. 

Student Recital Class 

Chapel 
6:30 p.m. 



Regals Basketball vs. Whittier College 

Gym 

7:30 p.m. ^-. 

T 

Rotaract Meeting _. 

Overton hall jf 

8 p.m. Jfc 

Common Ground ^ ^ ™ 

Chapel Narthex « * ™ 

9:11p.m. * * 



a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



thursday 

february 26 




Kingsmen Basketball vs. Occidental 

Gym 
7:30 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball Rosters Due 

SUB 

by 1 1 p.m. 

friday 

february 27 \>, 

Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 




Club LU: Mr. Kingsmen 

Forum 
9 p.m. 

Saturday 

february 28 

C5C Service Day 

SUB 

All Day 

Sunday 

february 29 



Intramural Softball 

Varsity Softball Field 
10 a.m. • 




Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 



Intramural Indoor Soccer 

Gym 



monday 

march 1 







o 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 



If 



CALL FOR SENIOR COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 

The Student Life Committee is looking for Seniors to submit a commencement speech of two pages or four min- 
utes of speaking time with the idea of highlighting what makes the CLU experience worthwhile and unique. 
All submissions must be submitted to Leah Herner at herner@clunet.edu by March I st . 
Selected submissions will perform for the Student Life Committee and the committee will decide the speaker. 




classifieds 

House for Rent: In Thousand Oaks 3 + 2. 
gardners included, $2)98 a month Short term 
okay. 

If interested, call: 
(805) 778-0867 or (805) 907-9701 

Room for Rent: In Moorpark. M/F, non-smok- 
er, students only, meal plan and DSL available 
(extra). S600/monlh 

If interested, page: 
(805) 378-6092 

Tutors Needed: $15-$I8/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise 
Paid training. Flexible hours Reliable transpor- 
tation required Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SAT l/II. GRE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information to; 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310) 282-6424 

or email resume to: 

instructorhiring6@aceeducation.com 

Homework Help: For high school student in 
Oxnard area. Once a week. $20/hr. 

If interested, contact Cruz at; 
(805)493-3219 

For Sale: A Sears 52" Screen TV. In excellent 
condition. Asking $500. 

If interested, contact Carolline at: 
(805) 987-3453 

For Sale: Parakeets. Asking $8 each. 

If interested, contact Carolline at: 

(805) 987-3453 



Classified ads can be placed 
on the Calendar paee for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are. subject to 
editing for content and clarity. 

Call: 
(805) -^b-^865 



Fit, February 27, 2004 

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
in front of the cafeteria 

There will be representatives from vari- 
ous brokers and programs (ISA. AIFS. 
Semester at Sea and others). 

Forfurther information, contact Dr. Cooch 
at i>oocii(rtcltinet,ctin or the Study Abroad 
offices at studmbmadQ clutinet.edu 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800- $3500+ for the sun- 
nier working with children outdoors! 

Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



["raveling on Holy Ground 



Ash Wednesday Chapel 

February 25, 2001 

10:10 a.m. 

Bishop Mu nay 
^m will he preaching 

W ^B and Holy Com- 

rW imiiiioii will he 
V^ served. Then 

^H we shall receive 
ashen crosses 

upon our hi'ows. 



CAREER EXPO 2004 



On Wed. March 10th 
from 10am to 2pm 



<C^J-^ In Quad area near 1 
flagpole along the 
planters. 



j5-v%^ In case of rain, the Expo will be moved to the 
^jjjgsg^ Huma 
^N^ under 



manities lobbies, Science lobby, and outside 
a tent between the two areas. 



All students must register 
in order to receive their required name badge. 

To requtcr.jtut email your name, phone number, email addr&u, major eJ grad date to. 

Cynthia Smith, Career Counselor/Recruitment Coordinator at 

csmith@clunet.edu 

The CLU Career Expo 2004 is"sponsored by Career Services. 
If any questions, they can be contacted at (805) 493-3196. 



Proactive Job Search 

Thursday. Februarv 19. 2004 



at 5:30 D.m. (Nelson Room) 



Did you know that applying for jobs 
from newspaper ads and web listing 
is the most ineffective method for 
the job search? Develop tactics for 
apporaching employers and a strat- 
egy that will generate interviews. 
This workshop will cover a num- 
ber of proactive methods that will 
help you find the right job for you! 



Interviewing for Oners 

Tuesday March 2. 2004 at 5: 



30 p.m. (Overton Hall) 

An interactive workshop that prepares 
you for interviewing with employers. 
Topics will include traditional and 
behavioral questions and how to han- 
dle panel interviews. Don't let tough 
questions throw you off, preparing 
and knowing how to sell your skills 
and uniqueness will be discussed. 
Tips on securing an offer and mock 
interviews can help you gain valu- 
able practice on handling interview 
questions. We will also cover career 
portfolios and how to close the inter- 
view. including the Thank You Letter. 



FREE SUPPORT CROUP for Eating Disorder Recoverers 



Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the F-Building 

Sponsored by the CLU Counseling Center and Marriage, Family 
Child Center, in conjunction with the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). 

For more information, please feel free to call or email me or log onto: 
hrtp y/www altnip npt/s itp/anariweb/ 

ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 
Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW Ext: 3390 ccollett(a>clunet.edu 



CLU SEMESTER at 
RIMBACH, GERMANY 




Applications are now being 
received for 11 semester :.f studv 
abroad at the Martin Luther Schule 
in Rimbach. Germany. This CLU 
program allows you to enroll at 
CLU, keep your financial aid. and 
spend a full semester as a student 
and teaching assistant at this 
distinguished German academy 

Application forms are available 
from Drs.Walter Stewart and 
Paula Egnatehik in the German 
department or from Randy Toland, 
Humanities Secretary. The dead- 
line to apply for fall semester. 
2004 is Friday, March 12, 2004. 

Tor more information, please see Dr. 

Egnatchilc, Dr. Walter Stewart, or 

Dr. Herbert Gooch, 

Director of Study Abroad. 



tHjHS ^(flSJffi 



February 25, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Political debate includes abortion, war 



By Devon Bostock 
News Editor 



A debate between the presidents of 
California Lutheran University's College 
Democrat and College Republican clubs 
lasted about an hour and a half each other last 
Wednesday, Feb. 1 7. 

The debate between senior Saul Aguilar 
of the College Democrat Club and junior 
Brian Roberts of the College Republican 
Club was attended by more than 30 students 
and covered a range of topics from weapons 
of mass destruction and the war in Iraq, to 
abortion and same-sex marriage. 

"It's great that we are getting together 
to discuss the issues," junior Curtis Harlow 
said. 

Dr. Herbert Gooch, chair of the political 
science department, moderated the event. 

Gooch opened the debate with a short dis- 
cussion of the Political Science Club's goal. 

"Our objective is to etch a distinction 
between the two parties," Gooch said. 

Each speaker was allowed to give a 
three-minute introduction of himself and why 
he picked his particular party. 

"I am a republican because I won't 
support the democrats as long as they are pro- 
abortion," Roberts said. 

Abortion was one of the most heavily 
debated issues of the evening. Both speakers 

"Youth participation in 
politics ... transcends 
party boundaries and 
Tdeologies." 



referred to it in their arguments 
on topics such as the death pen- 
alty and gun control. 

"1 am morally against abor- 
tion, but legally for it," Aguilar 
said. "The majority of legisla- 
tors are white men. and 1 don't 
think that they should decide 
what a woman should do with 
her body." 

"I am against abortion 
because of my morals," Roberts 
said. "Murder means [one has] 
an intent lo kill. To choose abor- 
tion is to choose murder." 

After the hour-long ques- 
tion session, the floor was 
opened to the audience so that 
members could ask each speak- 
er questions. Many of the ques- 
tions were directed at Aguilar *s 
pro-choice stance. 

"We can't impose our reli- Photograph By Jennifer Ma 

gious morals [regarding abor- &r. Herbert Gooch of the political science department introduces republican Brian 
tion] on others" Aguilar said. Roberts (right) and democrat Saul Aguilar (left). 

To close the session, each 




Saul Aguilar 
College Democrat Club 



speaker was asked to present 

the three biggest problems facing the United 

States. Both agreed that weapons of mass 

destruction and terrorism and security issues 

were among the most important issues to 

address. 

Aguilar also felt that environmental 
issues were of prime importance, while 
Roberts felt that the liberal point of view itself 
was the biggest threat to the country. 

A majority of the issues, especially abor- 
tion, were heavily debated, but both speakers 
agreed that they would like to see more stu- 
dent participation in the clubs regardless of 
which they chose. 

"Join a club to be active [politically]," 
Roberts said. 

Roberts said that too many people are 



uninterested in politics because they haven't 
found an issue that is important to them. 

Aguilar agreed. 

"It is events such as the ones we hold 
that promote youth participation in politics 
and ultimately that is what transcends party 
boundaries and ideologies," he said. 

The general opinion of the audience was 
that both Roberts and Aguilar handled the 
debate well. 

"They both had a lot of facts and I 
thought they worked really well together," 
said senior Kelley Elias. 

During the course of the semester, both 
clubs are planning several events. According 
to Aguilar, a prime focus for his club during 
the semester will be helping get Barbara Boxer 
re-elected. He is also trying to schedule a talk 
by a member of Congress. 



"We have Jeff Gorell coming on Feb. 
24 to speak — he's running for the 37th 
State Assembly spot — and Andy Fox and 
Ben Shapiro have expressed interest in 
coming to speak. We do have a big name 
that we are trying to bring in, and it's 
almost set in stone, but until it is, I won't 
disclose who it is or when they are com- 
ing," Roberts said. 

Any student with questions regard- 
ing either club may contact Roberts and 
Aguilar at broberts@clunet.edu and 
saguilar@clunet.edu. 

Students are also encouraged to come 
to the next meeting of the Political Science 
Club on Mar. 1 1. The meeting will feature 
a guest speaker from the FBI. 



Service Day coining 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Students will volunteer their time at a 
number of organizations for the semiannual 
Service Day. 

Service Day is organized by the 
California Lutheran University Community 
Sen ice Center. It will take place on Saturday, 
Feb. 28. 

Tve never participated before, but I'm 
looking forward to being in it this semester." 

rphomore Chris Hargrave said. 
Service Day's purpose is to make stu- 
dents closer to the community around them 
through helping those in need. In the past 
students have volunteered their time build- 
ing houses for Habitat for Humanity, made 
blankets for those in need and helped clean 
up local beaches. Many of the projects will 
be held off campus, but there are also projects 
that will be done on campus. 

This year, there is a new project for 
students to take part in. They will be able to 
help participants in the Special Olympics Ice 
Skating Tournament that will be held at the 
Oxnard Skating Center. 

Those students who are volunteering 
will be assisting with event set-up and prac- 
tice. They will also be judging the competi- 
!uoiis from 9 am to 4 p.m. 
"I think if people knew how fun it really 
was, they would do it Most people go into it 



"I think if people knew 
how fun it really was, 
they would do it." 



Pledge gets 401 signatures 
to promote respect, civility 



Rosa Corral 
Sophomore 



thinking it will be a lot of work, but it's actu- 
ally fun," sophomore Rosa Corral said. 

Some of the other projects in which 
students can participate include playing 
bingo and giving manicures at the Thousand 
Oaks Health Care Center, as well as paint- 
ing a mural at the Gull Wings Children's 
Museum. 

International Blankets for children is 
also seeking students to volunteer by making 
blankets for children in Africa, Mexico and 
Thailand The various on-campus projects 
will include working at the residence halls 
for campus beauuficauon and landscaping. 

"I think it's been a success because 
students really like getting out there and 
doing things. It helps giving them options," 
said Area Residence Coordinator Angela 
Rowley. 

Interested students should contact the 




Photograph courtesy of Multicultural Office 



Pledge drive workers collect signatures to promote respect. 



By Elodie Khavarani 
Special to The Echo 



Conmunity Service Center. 



In response to the racist acts that 
occurred on campus on Dec. 18, 2003, 
a total of 401 students, faculty and staff 
signed the "Pledge of Civility" at California 
Lutheran University.The pledge promises, 
"I pledge to act in a way that is both civil 
and respectful of those on campus who may 



differ from me by race, ethnicity, gender, 
religion, sexual orientation or political ideol- 
ogy and to personally challenge anyone who 
engages in acts of hatred." 

The Office of Multicultural and 
International Programs asked the campus 
community to sign the pledge from Feb. 9 
to 13 at a booth first installed at the flag- 
pole and then in front of the Student Union 
Building. 



®20£ ftOMOf) 



The Echo 



NEWS 



February 25, 2004 



CLU changing GPA req.'s for honors 



By Valerie Vallejo 
Staff Writer 



Beginning Fall 2004. incoming freshmen 
to California Lutheran University will face 
a tenth of a percent increase in grade point 
average requirements for Dean's List status 
and graduation with honors. These stricter 
standards, which have CLU professors and 
students alike debating the motivation behind 
the changes, once again brings up the topic of 
grade inflation. 

Central to the debate are the questions: are 
the increases due to CLU's ongoing attempt to 
align iLself with its peer institutions and raise 
the bar of academic standards/achievement'* 
Has grading at CLU and other universities 
across the nation simply become too easy? Or 
is it a little of both? 

"The change in the standards will make 
it a little harder for new students to graduate 
with honors. But these changes, which looked 
at the average or percentage of students on the 
Dean's List and graduating with honors, bnngs 
us more in alignment with other institutions, 
and thai is where we think we shQuld be," said 
Registrar Maria Kohnke. 

Graduating cum laude will require a 
GPA increase from 3.4 to 3.5; magna cum 
laude from 3.6 to 3.7; and summa cum laude 
from 3.7 to 3.8 respectively. Dean's List GPA 
requirements will also increase from 3.5 to 
3.6. 

"The changes are not about grade infla- 
tion; it's about reevaluating the standard. . 
Under the current standard, it is possible for 
a student to graduate with honors and never 
have made the Dean's List. That seems incon- 
gruous to me," said Dr. Beverly Kelley, profes- 
sor of communication. 



"It used to be truly an honor to graduate 
with honors," Kelley said. "We should have 
only one or two students graduating summa 
cum laude. Today we have about 30." 

Dr. Michaela Reaves, a professor of his- 
tory and the adviser to the Scholastic Honor 
Society, was the only faculty member who 
voted against the GPA changes. 

"[The changes] will drastically cut down 
the. number of 'summas' and keep really 
fine students from graduating with honors," 
Reaves said. "It saddens me that deserving 

"It is possible for a 
student to graduate with 
honors and have never 
made the Dean's List. 
That seems incongrous 
to me." 

Dr. Beverly Kelley 
Professor of Communication 

students won't be able to graduate with honors 
under the new requirements." 

"Do I think there is grade inflation ... 
yes," Reaves said. "Some majors grade easier 
than others. But it seems to me that we took 
the easy way out by adjusting the numbers 
instead of examining the real root issues." 

The American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences defines grade inflation as "an upward 
shift in the grade-point average without a cor- 
responding increase in student achievement." 

In 2002, the AAAS resumed the discus- 
sion about grade inflation when it disclosed 
a report that eight out of 10 Harvard students 
graduated with honors and nearly half of all 



grades awarded were A or an A minus, accord- 
ing to a report in USA Today, Feb. 7, 2002. 

Professor of history Dr. Paul Hanson said 
he believes the reevaluation to be a step in the 
right direction. 

"The research looked at the number or 
percentage of students on the Dean's List or 
receiving honors at other institutions, and our 
adjustments were made to put us in compli- 
ance or agreement with our peer institutions," 
Hanson said. "That is not to say that CLU is 
exempt from grade inflation. It has affected 
the entire nation from grade school to under- 
graduate grading. Both are motivations for 
evaluation." 

"Faculty members are to blame for grade 
inflation at every level. Tenure promotion 
and fear of punishment if standards are too 
rigorous are realities for some," he said. "The 
reevaluation is a useful first step and bnngs 
attention to an important issue." 

The concern on the part of some univer- 
sity professors is that they will be passed over 
for tenure or promotion if they receive too 
many bad student evaluations, and therefore 
they may lighten their grading requirements as 
an incentive for students to give them positive 
evaluations. 

"Research shows that there is no cor- 
respondence between tougher grading and 
low reviews. If we set the bar high enough, 
students will come up to it," Reaves said. "I 
believe most students are willing to learn and 
try hard. They want to be challenged." 

"I think that most students are aware that 
these are separate issues," Hanson said. "And 
I don't know if students respect an easy A. I 
mean, do you really want an honor that is so 
easily achieved that it is not necessarily an 
achievement?" 



Kim Allen, who is a junior communica- 
tion and sociology double major, said. "If I 
thought others who received A's got them too 
freely, it would change the integrity of what 
an A means to me. I want to feel as though I 
really earned it." 

"Sometimes I feel like professors don't 
grade -the overall content of an assignment. 
Instead they focus too much on quantity of 
work and not quality," Allen added. "So 
sometimes 1 feel like an A at CLU isn't neces- 
sarily an A in content. In that way I think the 
changes in the standards are good. Maybe it 
will force an overall change in the curricu- 
lum." 

"1 think the changes in the GPA standards 
are strictly a public relations tactic," said CLU 
alumnus Jeff Young. 

Young received his master of arts in edu- 
cation from CLU in 2003. 

"Just because the academic standards 
will now appear higher, it does not necessar- 
ily mean they are higher. Instead, I believe 
we need to evaluate our motivation for the 
changes, as an institution and as educators," 
he said. 

"If our motivation for presenting grades 
is based on what other universities are doing 
or a professor's tenure track, then our focus is 
off and there is a problem," Young said. "But 
if the reason for giving higher grades is based 
on student achievement or faculty preparation, 
then we are on the right track. I believe the 
focus should always be on the quality of edu- 
cation, never on the statistics." 

Students who want to learn more about 
the changes in the GPA requirements can 
contact Maria Kohnke at the Office of the 
Registrar, 493-3105, or Provost and Dean of 
Faculty Dr. Pamela Jolicoeur at 493-3145. 




ISSY's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



Sharing your computer account (e.g., e- 
mail, desktop login, Datalel) passwords with 
another person violates CLU's computer use 
policy. 

As account owners and users of uni- 
versity computing resources, employees 
and students alike are held responsible for 
any actions that occur if their accounts are 
accessed by anyone else. 

The Computer Use Policy specifi- 
cally states, "users are assigned one account 
for individual use. Shanng an individual 
computer account with other persons is 
prohibited. Passwords should be protected 
from discovery or use by others. If account 
holders knowingly or carelessly make their 
password available to others, they may still 
be held accountable for any actions that may 
anse from use of their account by another 
individual. 

Windows login password: 

1 . Login to your desktop. Press Ctrl, Alt 
and Delete. 

2. Choose the "change password" button. 

Mac login password: 

1. Contact the Help Desk for instruc- 



E-mail password: 

1 . In Web Mail: Go to the CLU Web 
mail site at http://www.clunet.edu/mail. 

2. Click on the "change password" 
option and then follow the directions on the 
screen. (This feature will not work if you are 
changing a password for the very first time.) 

Eudora password: 

1. Select the Special menu and click on 
the Change Password option. 

WebAdvisor password: 

1 . Login to WebAdvisor. 

2. Choose the appropriate screen:Web 
Advisor for Students, Faculty or Employees. 

3. Find the User Account Section and 
Choose the Change password option. 

Preventive steps to avoid misuse of your 
CLU accounts include: 

1. Locking the computer when leaving 
your work station. 

2. Never divulge your account password 
to anyone else. 

3. Select a password that is difficult for 
others to decipher, i.e., don't use common 
words, instead use a combination of alpha 
and numenc characters. 

4. Change your password on a regular 
basis (ISSy recommends every six months). 

For the complete CLU Computer Use 
policy, go to the following Web site: http: 
//www.clunet.edu/ISS/aboutiss/policies.php 

If you have any questions regarding 
account security, including changing pass- 
words, contact the Help Desk (x3698 or 
help@clunet.edu) for assistance. 



L 



$!t0tt tip ^Xcij0 
tmlixtt at 



'A 'Beautifuf Look 

full-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805)492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

4II E Avcmii: de Lck Artuilc* in MmuKinil Oaks 
Ncai Rile Aid and Wiuik- Funds 



February 25, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



What do you think needs to improve on campus? 




A:,- 


*v ^ 


?A 




\ vl 




^"ifrk "*li ^ 


i*v 


? A 


' / 




Adrianna Sildes, criminal justice, 2004 Jennifer Endres, history, 2004 Allison Fredericksen. women studies, social Pamela Kawano, criminal justice, 2004 

science, religion, 2006 
"They need to do something about those "The wa " s are t0 ° m > n m me dorms and "The drama department needs an actual "The Centrum needs to be open on the 

smelly trees." J™ can near people." theater." weekends." 




V ^ 


^J 




mM 


Wl *v 




W 








>«/ 


t- 






3 










Charlie Brown, sports medicine, 2006 



"David Zacks, political science, 2006 



Zubi Olin, geology, 2006 



Jenny Pauley, business, 2006 
"The visiting hours." • 



"Lunch hours in the Caf. They stop serv- "Our campus policy on alcohol. Weneed "We could use a bigger library." 

ing hot food at 12:30 and 1 don't get out of to be more accepting of society's norms." 
class until 1:30." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography by Bell Lopez. 



This week's crossword puzzle 



puzz142 


























ACROSS 50 Highest point 20 Eg|_ 
1 Baglike structure 51 -Bra** , eam member 

4 Attacking to capture 53Contorm r 
9 Period of lime 55 Stemmed glass S^L™?* 
,2 Frozen water 58 NY Indian 27 Conscious 

13 Alphabetical resource 61 My gal _ 28 Kest 

14 Kettle lop ' 62 Unsure "™™"** 
'5 "cation o, 64 Over.poe.ic, *0«n 

JSS*" SESrf 36Chns.,an,o»e 

21 Water faucet 67 Direction (abbr , «1 Agfc ^ 

22 Sulk .,. Phft ,_„ 

24 Small child DOWN S?nSkef,sh 
26 S uss,anru, r ,,ar, J SSSd" un^ Kk 

5 Carrie « 52 Sparta queen 
,1 c , i. 4 Place 54 Poker stake 

33 Female sheep 4 riace 

34 Midwest state (abbr.) 5 Inactive Sri 

35 Male sheep 6 Edwards nickname 56 Gam 
37 Brewed dnnk 7 Obtain STCtothe 

39 Southern state (abb,, 1^''°^ 60 Plural of is 

40Males initaiKh 63 Old Testament city 

42 Girl (slang) 10 Abolish 

44 Greek marketplace 1 < Summer drink 

46 Great lake 16 Fur mammal 

48 Green vegetable ' 8 Rodent 


i 


2 


' 




' 


s 


6 


7 


■ m 


10 


11 




12 






■ 








■ 






15 






IB 




m I? 




IB 








a 








* ■ 




■ 


22 


23 






■ 




' 


■- 




27 


2a 


20 








. 




" 




■ 




" 






34 






" 




36 




" 




M 




■ 




40 






■ ' 




43 




- 




45 






46 






47 




" 




4a 




SO 










51 




a I 


" 




54 








68 


M 








1 iV u 








59 


80 


61 








" 




63 








" 






65 






" 










" 






The Community Service Center is sponsoring this year's Spring Semester 
Service day on Saturday, Feb. 28. There are artistic, social and athletic projects 
that are on and off campus. Project sign up sheets are on the Service day table 

in the SUB. Questions? Contact the Community Service Center at x 3981. 



The Echo 



FEATURES 



February 25, 2004 



Best Buddies brings happiness to all who participate 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



Best Buddies, which strives lo enhance 
the lives of individuals with intellectual disabil- 
ities by providing opportunities for one-on-one 
friendships and integrated employment, may 
not exist much longer at California Lutheran 
University. Lack of student interest may cause 
the club, which operates in conjunction with 
the Community Service Center, to fold. 

Head of the Community Service Center 
Angela Rowley is the faculty adviser in charge 
of the CLU's Best Buddies chapter. 

Students who want to participate in this 
one-on-one friendship must make a year-long 
commitment. 



CLU participants in Best Buddies 
required to make a phone call to their buddy 
at least once a week and meet with their buddy 
twice a month. Group activities can also be 
planned; past events have included going out 
bowling or to the movies. 

Freshman Dawn Redman, who has been 
involved in the program since her sophomore 
year in high school, is now co-president of the 
organization, along with sophomore Karis 
Rower. 

"Getting to know adults with disabilities 
[is my favorite part of the club] because in my 
everyday life you don't get to know that many 
people with disabilities. It's kind of fun being 
around a relaxed, easy-going person," 1 said 
Rower. 



"In my everyday life you 
don't get to know that 
many people with disabili- 
ties. It's kind of fun being 
around a relaxed, easy-go- 
ing person." 

Dawn Redman 
Freshman 

Best Buddies gives students an opportu- 
nity to be more aware about individuals with 
intellectual disabilities. However, the chapter 
on campus may not exist much longer. 

"[The] program might be discontinued 
due to [the] lack of interest." said Rower. 
"People don't know about the program [or 



they're] not interested right now." 

Anthony K. Shriver founded the organiza- 
tion in 1989 and is still its president and chair. 

Best Buddies is an international club, 
existing in countries such as Egypt, Greece, 
Colombia and Canada. Participants usually 
include but are not limited to middle school, 
high school and college students. 

Students who would like to learn more 
about the Best Buddies organization and 
the chapter on campus can attend one of 
the meetings in Overton Hall, held the first 
Sunday of every month at 8 p.m. For addi- 
tional information, contact Angela Rowley 
at extension 3680. Students can also visit 
the Best Buddies International website at 
www.bestbuddies.ore,. 



"Take Back the Night" planned during Sexual Assault Awareness Month 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



In observance of Sexual Assault 
Awareness Month, California Lutheran 
University will be holding "Take Back the 
Night" on April 28, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

""Take Back the Night' is a candlelight 
vigil held for the purposes of speaking out 
against sexual assault and domestic violence," 
said Michelle Taylor, CLU student and major 
proponent of this year's event. 

Initially formed in England, "Take Back 



the Night" was created in response to raise 
awareness for sexual assault. The event moved 
to the United States in 1978 and has been 
spreading rapidly, both at home and abroad, 
since its inception. 

"Take Back the Night" has been held 
once before at CLU in 2000. Former student 
Lindsey Heitmann, who will help again this 
year, organized the previous "Take Back the 
Night." 

The first hour of the event will be held 
in Kingsmen Park and will include informa- 
tion tables run by Planned Parenthood, the 
Coalition and other service-oriented organi- 



Second annual "New 
Music Concert" impresses 



zations within the community. The following 
hour and a half will include poetry readings 
and a march around CLU. 

"This is a community event; everyone is 
welcome and encouraged to come " Taylor said. 

Other events have been planned to coin- 
cide with Sexual Assualt Awareness Month. 
On April 14, a class called "Assertiveness and 
Self-Defense" will be held free of charge. Sign 
ups for the event will begin on March 24 at the 
Women's Resource Center. 

April 21 will be "Denim Day" in Ventura 
County. The event, inspired by a universally 
unpopular rape trial verdict, encourages sup- 



porters to wear denim to spread awareness of 
sexual assault. 

National statistics on rape show that 98 
percent of all sexual assault survivors will 
never see their attacker caught, tried and 
imprisoned. One out of every three women 
will be the victim of sexual assault during her 
lifetime. 

For more information on "Take Back 
the Night" or any of the other events planned 
for Sexual Assault Awareness Month, contact 
Kateri Alexander, x3345 or Michelle Taylor at 
807-0793. 



Don't Drink and Drive 



By Farima Nojoumi 
Staff Writfr 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writfr 



California Lutheran University 
celebrated the second annual "New 
Music Concert." Titled "13 Themes for 
a Triskaidekaphobic." it included per- 
formances by students, faculty members 
and community members. 

This year, composer, trumpet play- 
er, conductor and private music instruc- 
tor Jeff Kiaser was the guest of honor. 
The theme of the concert was dedicated 
to Kaiser's mentors. Arnold Schoenberg 
and Laurence Sterne. 

According to the program, "the 
score is set-up in thirteen different 
modules. Each of these modules has 
one ore more sections that are assigned 
to one of four instruments (strings, 
woodwinds, brass, percussion) and can 
be played individually, in combination 
with the sections in that module, or even 
in combination with other modules and 
sections. This allows for quite a bit of 
variety." 

The first half of the concert featured 
student and teacher performances. The 
second half featured improvised perfor- 
mances. 

According to the program, "individ- 
uals will be called upon to create solos 
on the spot. These solos (and duets, 
trios, quartets) act as transitions to other 
modules, and also influences the deci- 
sion as to what module the conductor 
chooses by deciding on compliment- 
ing or contrasting the improvised solo 
material." 

Many of the performers enjoyed th 




Photograph by Claire Hillard 



Jim Connolly plays the Acoustic Bass dur- 
ing the performance. 

spontaneity of the concert. 

"The concert was really out there 
and may have seemed wired but it was 
a great experience," said junior Jon 
Oakman. 

Not only did the performers seem 
to enjoy the concert, the audience did 
as well. 

"1 wasn't going to go, but I am 
glad I came, because I got to hear how 
creative this University really is," said 
freshman Megan Green. 



If you've been drinking during an 
evening with your friends, call Safe Rides 
to get home safely. Safe Rides is a pro- 
gram that provides free, safe, and confi- 
dential rides home for students. They run 
on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights 
from 1 1 :00 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. They provide 
rides from Agoura Hills, Westlake Village, 
Newbury Park and Thousand Oaks. Safe 
Rides are only $1 with a CLU ID. Call 
805-495-3500. 

Punishment fora first DUI offense can 
inclue one hour in handcuffs, four hours in 
jail, three hours getting one's car back, 
two days at the DMV, two days picking 
up highway trash, two nights attending 
a DUI Victim Impact Panel, 15 weeks of 
DUI class, four months without a driver's 
license, three years on probation, seven 
years with two points on one's driving 
record and $5,294 in assessment, fees, and 
fines. 

According to statistics: 

• Accidents caused by drinking and 
driving are a leading cause of death. 

• Traffic crashes are the greatest sin- 
gle cause of death for every age from six 
through 28. Almost half of these crashes 



are alcohol-related. (National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration. 1995) 

• Approximately 240,000 to 360,000 
of the nation's 12 million current under- 
graduates will ultimately die from alcohol- 
related causes — more than the number 
that will get MAs or PhDs combined. 
(Eigen, 1991) 

• It is estimated that the 2.2 million 
drunk driving crashes each year victim- 
ize 1.3 million innocent people who are 
injured or have Iheir vehicles damaged. 

HOW TO STOP SOMEONE FROM 
DRIVING DRUNK 

• Try reasoning with the person. Tell 
him or her about the consequences of driv- 
ing drunk. 

• Make other arrangements. See if a 
sober friend or a taxi will take the person 
to his or her destination. 

• Stand firm. Don't be swayed by the 
drunken person's mistaken belief that he or 
she can drive. 

• Take the drunk person's keys away. 
If that is not possible, call the police. 

Remember, to do doing the right thing 
as a friend. 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 10 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn $2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamn.com 



Gome see CLU's finest males compete for the coveted first-ever 
Mr. Kingsmen title on Feb. 27 in the Forum at 9 p.m. 



@to tCHiO 



February 25, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 7 



Students find relaxation at yoga classes 



By Tina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



At the end of a long day, full of stress- 
ful classes, tedious work or gaieling home- 
work, many students look for some form of 
relaxation. Working out watching television, 
hanging out with friends or sleeping have 
been die usual options that California Lutheran 
University students have had in the past. This 
spring semester, however, students can add 
yoga that to that list. CLU senior Etienne 
Emanuel teaches the class, which is offered 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. 
in Nygreen I . 

Emanuel's mother taught and practiced 
yoga while he gTew up. At the age of 19 he got 
a job at the Ojai Valley Inn doing one-on-one 
instruction. After doing yoga instruction for an 
R.A. program at CLU, Nate Fall suggested a 
yoga class taught to all students. Emanuel hap- 
pily agreed to the idea and is impressed with 
the feedback he has received so far. 

"The classes are going really well," 
Emanuel said. "I'm impressed by the turnout 
and people seem to be coming back and enjoy- 
ing themselves. 1 think it's a good match for 
my teaching abilities thus far and the level of 
the students here at CLU. I think a lot of people 
have never even taken yoga classes before 
this, so I'm happy to be a part of people's new 
experience." 

Emanuel has been teaching Hatha Yoga 
at the classes, which is a mixture of breath- 



, techniques, body poses and meditation. 
One of the exercises is a balancing technique 
called "half moon." It combines balancing 
on one leg, leaning to the side with one arm 
in the air and grasping an ankle with the 
other hand. 

"It increases strength definitely, and it 
helps your balance, coordination and flexibil- 
ity in your hamstrings," Emanuel said. 

Senior Luke Patten has been attending the 
yoga classes for the past three weeks. 

"They allow me to take stock of the day 
and kind of figure out where I'm at. I can 
center myself and relax," said Patten. "I would 
strongly recommend it. I think it's a good thing 
for everyone to be involved in." 

Aside from improving overall health, 
the classes can also increase one's flexibil- 
ity. Emanuel, who is also a member of the 
Kingsmen basketball team, thinks that both 
students and athletes can benefit from these 
techniques. 

"1 think being flexible is definitely an 
advantage and really a vital part of any sports 
program. It also helps your strength and 
the more flexible your are the longer your 
muscles are and the harder the contractions 
are that you get for your strength and power," 
Emanuel said. 

The number of students attending classes 
has increased as more people find them out. 
About 20 students have attended the last few 
sessions. 




Photograph courtesy of Todd Ki 
Micah Narou stretches during the yoga class. The 
classes are every Tuesday and Thursday at 7 p.m. 



"1 think they need to find a bigger space 
because it seems more and more people are 
coming," said sophomore Lauren Heim. "I 
think it's a really good relaxation technique for 
students getting stressed out with school and a 
great way to relax." 

At the end of the session, Emanuel has 
class members He down, close their eyes and 
reflect on the day. He feels that this is essential, 
especially for students and contributes to the 
personal growth of those who attend the class. 



"When they come in here, all their prob- 
lems and everyday issues go away, and they're 
just in class learning about them selves," 
Emanuel said. 

The yoga classes are free and are open to 
all students. For more information about the 
yoga classes, students can contact Nate Fall 
at x3523. 



Harmony Week hosted by Gay-Straight Alliance 



By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writfr 



What do drag queens, ice cream, a 
gay men's chorus and art work all have in 
common? They'll all be included in Harmony 
Week, hosted by California Lutheran 
University's Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA). 

The third annual Harmony Week will 
take place this March 1-5. The weekJong 
event takes place each year to promote diver- 
sity and awareness on campus and in the 
community. Harmony Week will feature new 
events and also bring back some old Harmony 



Week traditions. 

Events start with a gay, lesbian, bisex- 
ual and transgender (GLBT) art walk at the 
flagpole. Senior Sarah Mendivel is the curator 
for the event. 

"This show is very exciting because it is 
groundbreaking for the university. There will 
be over 30 artists in all different mediums 
expressing their talents," Mendivel said. 

Tuesday, March 2, will be the "Day of 
Silence." The silence represents all the voices 
that haven't been heard throughout the GLBT 
community and those who have been victims 
of hate crime. 



Cheap Fares? Budget Hotels? 
Advisors Who Get It? 



This ain't your parents' travel agency., it's yours. 



"[Participants don't speak] for 12 hours 
out of the day. When someone talks to you, 
you hand them a card that explains why you're 
silent," GSA club president Nick Gordon 
said. 

Another event that commemorates vic- 
tims of a hate crime will be "Jeans Day." Blue 
jeans will be strung along Memorial Parkway 
with the names of victims who have died along 
with their story. 

"Purple Haze Mardi Gras Masquerade 
Ball" is planned for Thursday, March 4. The 
GSA will award prizes to professors, staff 
and students for costumes, enthusiasm and 

Movie "Barbershop 2 
doesn't make the cut 



advocacy. 

To finish off the week there will be a 
"Bi-Scream social' 1 and concert featuring Los 
Angeles "Gay Men's Chorus." 

"We hope everyone comes out and sup- 
ports the awareness week. It's just about 
understanding and teaching tolerance. We're 
trying to heal the hale," club member Sky 
Mendez said. 

All of the events during Harmony Week 
are free and all of CLU is welcome to partici- 
pate. 



59 




By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 



The crazy employees of a barbershop 
run by Calvin (rapper Ice Cube) are back to 
deliver more laughs to the audience in the 
sequel of the original 2002 "Barbershop." 

Gina (rapper and actress Queen Latifah), 
the stylist next door, tries to expand her own 
business by attracting new customers as well 
as Calvin's customers. In the meantime, 
Calvin must preserve his father's shop, this 
time against brand-name chains. 

Although the film provides a strong 
sense of community and many laughs to go 
along with its subject matter, sequels seem 
to never capture the magic of the first film. 
"Barbershop 2" is no different. One hour 
and 56 minutes seemed to be too little time 
to develop the characters and investigate 
the situations they face while working at the 
barbershop. 

The audience gets to meet Calvin's wife 



and newborn child, as well as watch Calvin 
struggle to provide for his family while try- 
ing to honor his father and his dream. 

The audience, however, is left wonder- 
ing about Ricky's past and if he is still getting 
caught up. Also, the viewer never finds out 
why the white guy in the front chair wasn't 
permitted to cut anybody's hair or enough 
about his conflict with Jimmy, the prissy man 
who liked his coffee specific. Furthermore, 
the film doesn't show ifterri left her cheating 
boyfriend for good, the movie shouldn't have 
left so many unanswered questions. 

"Barbershop 2" shows that community 
is just as important as family. The audience 
sees that in the end. we need both commu- 
nity and family, which often overlap. The 
barbershop provides a certain outlet for the 
community. 

Enjoying this film is not a problem; in 
fact, you might even find it in your parents' 
DVD collection. And it's still true that you 
can say anything in the barbershop. 



Have you taken a great photo lately? Drop it off at the Echo office with a one line 
caption that includes names and location. It could run as a Featre photo! 

Questions? Call the Echo at x3465 __ 



W.&B lEaa® 



8 



The Echo 



OPINION 



February 25, 2004 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 



The two-time loser tries again 




By Brett C. Rowland 
Editor In Chief 



Now, here comes the reclusive Ralph 
Nader, announcing his candidacy for president of 
the United States. Nader's is a two-time loser. He 
lost big in 1 996 and 2000, unable to get 5 percent 
of the vote in either contest He's no Ross Perot, 
but in 2000 he was able to claim 2.7 percent of 
the vote spending less money during his entire 
campaign than other candidates squander on 
lunch. AI Gore supporters still haven't forgiven 
Nader for stealing those precious votes that may 
have cost Gore the win. 

Nader is a necessary evil, especially when 
one considers public schooling. We learn in 
■ school that the only way to change the govern- 
ment in times of trouble is to pick a Republican 
or Democratic candidate to save the country. 
From kindergarten to high school we are taught 
that a single great leader has (and will) always 



solved our nation's problems. We learn that 
Lincoln freed the slaves and Roosevelt lifted the 
country out of the Depression, but we hear little 
about how ordinary citizens have joined together 
peacefully to bring about change. Absent from 
curriculum are lessons about the power of the 
people and the value of informed dissent. 

Nader embodies the power of the people; 
the power of the lone citizen. In his many years 
as a consumer advocate, Nader has fought hard 
against General Motors and improved the qual- 
ity of seat belts, and as a result, probably saved 
many lives. Furthermore, his book, "Unsafe at 
Any Speed," sent a powerful message to big 
corporations. Nader made it clear that consumers 
and citizens will not stand for shoddy products 
made by corporations that care more about profit 
than the safety of their products. 

In addition to improving the quality of seat 
belts, Nader has formed dozens of public inter- 
est groups. This loser of a politician has made 
improvements that affect the lives of all consum- 
ers. For example, we have Nader to thank when 
we get free hotel stays and free airline tickets after 
being bumped from a flight. Nader was once 
bumped from a flight and was so offended that 
he fought to change airline policies for all con- 
sumers. All this seems to prove H. L. Mencken's 
point that 'The government consists of a gang of 
men exactly like you and me. They have, taking 
one with another, no special talent for the busi- 
ness of government; they have only a talent for 



getting and holding office." Nader docs not have 
a special talent for getting and holding office. His 
talent is in consumer advocacy. Nader knows that 
he won't be moving into the White House next 
year, but he's running anyway. It takes a real man 
to run for president twice, lose twice and still be 
able to raise money for a third run. 

Nader's entrance into the race scares 
Democrats and Republicans, but they have little 
to fear. Political junkies are predicting that Nader 
will do worse this year than he has in past. Some 
claim that he won't be able to get more than 1 
percent of the vote this time. Democrats, weary 
of Gore's loss in 2000, are unlikely to vote for 
Nader. Most Republicans don't have money 
or votes to waste on a loser; besides, given the 
stark contrasts between Bush and Nader, it is 
unlikely that registered Republicans will switch 
their votes. 

These are dark times and Nader knows it. 
He brings hope to thousands of independents 
and Greens and diversifies the landscape of 
American political thought Diversity is rare, 
but much needed in today's political climate. 
Nader's campaign is sure to exploit the fact that 
Republicans and Democrats have been squeezed 
so far to center. 

If we are lucky, Nader will be invited to join 
in debates with Bush and Kerry this fall. But we 
are not lucky, Nader won't debate, and instead, 
we will be treated to the same tired rhetoric and 
rancor we heard in 2000. 



Bush unable to locate WMDs in Iraq 



By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



Former U.S. weapons inspector David Kay 
has advised President Bush to acknowledge that 
he was wrong about hidden weapons in Iraq 
and "move ahead with overhauling the intel- 
ligence process." Many Americans, including 
myself, have been patiently waiting for Bush to 
provide some sort of evidence to back his claim 
of these supposed "weapons of mass destruc- 
tion." However, over a year later, the President 
has come up empty-handed once again. In an 
interview with the Associated Press, Kay said 
the "serious burden of evidence" suggests that 
Saddam Hussein did not have chemical, biologi- 
cal and nuclear weapons at the beginning of the 
war in Iraq, but instead was seriously engaged in 
developing missiles. 

"You are better off if you acknowledge 
the error and say we have learned from it and 
move ahead," Kay said "I'm afraid if you don't 
acknowledge the error, and everybody knows 
why you are afraid to acknowledge the error, 
your political opponents will seize on it, the 
press will seize on it and no one will give your 
credit." 

Credit for what? Since the beginning. Bush 
has said he had expected to find weapons in Iraq. 
However, U.N. and U.S. searched have failed to 



find these weapons. 

Since resigning in January, Kay has said 
that U.S. intelligence was wrong in claiming that 
Saddam has "stockpiles of chemical and bio- 
logical weapons and advanced nuclear weapons 
programs." 

So did Bush mislead the American public? 
After all, it was these programs that were the 
main justification for the war in Iraq. As a result 
of his claim, we engaged in a war where many 
lives, both Americans and Iraqis, were lost, pos- 
sibly needlessly. 

However, Bush will not back down from 
his stance and insists that weapons could still be 
discovered. In an interview with NBC's "Meet 
the Press," Bush said, "They could be hidden. 
They could have been transported to another 
country." Or they could have been buried in that 
rat hole with Saddam Hussein. Give me a break. 

At least other people are finally seeing the 
light Secretary of State Colin Powell said he was 
surprised that no weapons were found in Iraq. 

"We presented what we believed the truth to 
be at the time," Powell said. 

"My only serious regret about the contin- 
ued holding on to these hopes that eventually 
we will find [weapons] is it allows us to avoid 
the hard steps necessary to reform the process," 
Kay said. 

Despite the lack of weapons of mass 



destruction, Kay said, "Iraq had an aggressive 
program to develop missiles assisted by foreign 
technology and scientists." 

Another issue was the discovery of thou- 
sands of high-strength aluminum tubes, which 
Bush administration officials said were meant to 
be used to make nuclear bomb fuel out of ura- 
nium. Kay said analysts have concluded Iraq had 
"no active nuclear program" and that the tubes 
were to be used for artillery rockets. 

Asked whether analysts believed their 
findings had been distorted, Kay said, "Were 
some people uncomfortable about some of the 
rhetoric? I think the fair answer to that is 'yes.'" 
Politicians choose the best possible argument that 
will support the course of action they've decided 
on regardless of whether it's foreign policy or 
not. Is that cherry picking? That's the nature of 
the political process." 

Though under attack over the U.S.-led cam- 
paign in Iraq, Bush proposed tighter international 
regulation of nuclear equipment that could be 
used for atomic weapons. 

"We are using every means of diplomacy 
to confront the regimes that develop deadly 
weapons," Bush said. "And we have shown our 
willingness to use force when force is required." 
There's no doubt about that, Mr. President. 
Now if only you could find Osama bin Laden. 
Maybe then America can breathe a bit easier. 



gjgg ya®&® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
. ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSfNESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



tH-HJi ^fflM© 



February 25, 2004 



OPINION 



Low-carb diets are examined 



The Echo 9 



By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



It's virtually impossible to walk down a 
grocery aisle nowadays without some sort of 
specialized Atkins brand product staring you 
in the face. It's no wonder that the low-carbo- 
hydrate food has become a S 1 5 billion a year 
industry. 

Not to be left out, several fast food 
restaurants including In-and-Out Burger, 
McDonald's and Jack-in-lhe-Box are now 
catenng to low-carb eaters by offering their 
hamburgers "without the bun." Instead, they 
stick the meat between two large pieces of let- 
tuce. A true Atkins dieter would be proud. 

As bread sales have steadily declined, 
the meat industry is now booming in the low- 
carb, high-protein phenomenon sweeping the 
country. 

However, in the midst of an Atkins- 
crazed, low-carbohydrate revolution, a new 
study that appeared in the "Archives of 
Internal Medicine" suggests that a diet consist- 
ing of a lot of carbohydrates and less fat can 
lead to weight loss without exercise or cutting 
calories. 

The study consisted of 34 overweight 
adults who were divided into one of three dif- 
ferent 1 2-week programs: those who only ate 
the recommended diet for three months; those 
who ate the recommended diet and exercised 
regularly; and finally, those who maintained 
their normal eating habits. 

All participants had meals prepared for 
them and were told to eat as much as they 
wanted. They were also told to return any 
uneaten food, which researched said enabled 



Dear Echo, 

As a double major in French and inter- 
national studies, I am always interested in 
internationally related events on campus. 
Naturally, when I saw a flyer titled "Living 
with the Consequences of U.S. Foreign 
Policy" I was immediately interested. The pre- 
sentation took place on January 30, and was 
about the effects of U.S. policy in Nicaragua. 
It consisted of a slide show documentation of 
human rights violations given by Paul Dix 
and Pam Fitzpatrick. The husband and wife 
team traveled through Nicaragua during the 
1980s and photographed Nicaraguans who 
were victims of the Contra War. Last year Paul 
and Pam relumed to Nicaragua and traced the 
same people they photographed in the 1980s. 

I was particularly interested in the pre- 
sentation since I had taken a class about the 
history and politics of Latin America last 
semester. I was interested in seeing what I 
learned in the classroom carry over in a real 
way. I was not prepared for how much the pre- 
sentation would affect me personally. I knew 
that the Contra War, which was a U.S.-backed 
effort by the Nicaraguan military to overthrow 
the Sandinista regime and the guerrilla fight- 
ers, had lead to the deaths of thousands of 
Nicaraguans. Reading about what happened 
on page in comparison to seeing slides of 
people who lost limbs and family members 
because of U.S. actions as well as hearing 
their personal testimonies was a wake-up call 
for me. 

Knowing that people have to live on three 
dollars a day and that many of them are doing 
so without an arm, leg or even an eye because 
they were shot in a Contra attack supported by 
the United States is unreal for us as Americans 
to imagine. Many of the Nicaraguans had 
been young children when during the Contra 
War and despite the loss of a limb, were still 
living. 

Paul and Pam read some of the testimo- 



them to calculate calorie intake. 

Participants on the recommended diet 
lost about 7 pounds without cutting calories 
and without exercise, and those who exercised 
a few times a week lost approximately 11 
pounds. The control group who maintained 
their regular eating habits lost no weight. 

Foods on the successful diets included 
high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili, whole- 
wheat spaghetti, many fruits and vegetables, 
and skim milk. Daily calories totaled about 
2,400, similar to participants' usual consump- 
tion. 

The high-carb eaters also lost a higher 
percentage of body fat than people who fol- 
lowed a diet that was lower in carbohydrates 
and higher in fat. 

"If you just simply reduce fat in the diet, 
and allow people to eat as much carbohydrates 
as they want, they lose weight," Dr. William 
J. Evans of the University of Arkansas for 
Medical Sciences said. 

These findings appear at a time when the 
low-carb diets like Atkins and South Beach 
are more popular than ever. However, some 
researchers and health professionals remain 
skeptical of low-carb diets, especially the 
Atkins diet, which has been criticized for 
pushing the consumption of highly saturated 
fat foods linked with increased cholesterol and 
heart disease. 

One main criticism of the Atkins diet is 
that the dieter is not required to exercise in 
order to see the weight loss results. 

"The whole idea that you could lose 
weight without reducing energy intake 
(calories) flies in the face of 100 years of 
data," said Gary Foster, clinical director of 



the University of Pennsylvania's Weight and 
Eating Disorders Program. Foster says that 
while he recommends a low-fat, high-carb diet 
to patients, without calorie reduction it would 
be "a public health disaster." 

And although high-carb eaters shed 
pounds without exercise and without counting 
calones, Katherine Tallmadge, a spokesperson 
for the American Dietetic Association, pointed 
out that the best way to lose weight is to eat 
a healthy amount and to try to bum off food 
with exercise. 

"In the end, (overeating and avoiding 
exercise) is doomed to fail," Tallmadge said. 

To appreciate how low-carb diets work, it 
is important to understand the logistics behind 
the plan. When you ingest carbohydrates, they 
break down into sugar in the digestive track. 
The sugars stimulate the pancreas to produce 
insulin. The more sugar that is present, the 
more insulin gets reduced, causing an excess 
storage of fat. 

However, not all carbs are bad. Vegetables, 
high fiber beans, lentils and squashes are all 
good sources of carbohydrates. 

Now, coming on the heels of this study 
is a new revelation regarding the glorified diet 
doctor himself. 

A recent report states that Dr. Robert 
Atkins, whose popular diet stresses protein 
over carbohydrates, weighed 258 pounds at 
his death and had a history of heart disease. 
He died last April after being injured in a fall 
on an icy street. 

The Wall Street Journal reported that 
Atkins suffered a heart attack, congestive heart 
failure and hypertension. 

According to the Centers for Disease 



Letters to the Editor 



nies about the experiences of the Nicaraguans 
they photographed. It was amazing that these 
people possessed the strength to keep on 
living, and it was equally devastating to see 
what they had lost. One woman's testimony 
especially stuck in my mind. She said that she 
thought it was terrible that American children 
did not know what their own country was 
doing in other parts of the world. 

That really stood out me because it is 
true; how many children, let alone college 
students, know about U.S. intervention in 
places like Nicaragua and what kinds of 
events occur as a result? How many of us 
ever take a moment during to the day to 
wonder what people in other parts of the 
world are experienc'ing? I believe that is the 
reason people in countries like Nicaragua see 
Americans as ignorant and selfish- If I had not 
taken a class about Latin America, I would be 
unaware of what has happened in other parts 
of the world because of our government's 
actions. 

I believe that Americans need to be made 
more aware what is happening in other parts 
of the world so that we can help prevent 
situations like the Contra War from happen- 
ing again. One way to inform people is to 
encourage information sessions and presen- 
tations on topics like third-world countries, 
world hunger, poverty, and other international 
concerns. More internationally related events 
on our own campus would certainly open 
the eyes of many students at Cal Lutheran 
to the world beyond the classroom. I would 
like to commend the religion department and 
the Global Peace and Justice Committee for 
making an event like this possible. It certainly 
opened my eyes and made what I learned in 
the classroom real. 

Clarice Hammett 

Sophomore 

French and international studies 



Dear Echo, 

This is in response to Brett Rowland's 
editorial in the Feb. 1 1 issue of the Echo. He 
wrote about how important it is for each and 
every one of us to register to vote, and then 
actually go and vote on Election Day. For once 
I thought he had written a decent editorial; that 
is until I got about halfway through the second 
to last paragraph. Mr. Rowland stated "putting 
an American flag slicker on your SUV is not 
being patriotic." 

Well, Mr. Rowland, I have an Amencan 
flag sticker on my SUV, and I feel that it's very 
patriotic. 

Anytime someone displays an Amencan 
flag in a respectful way. it's being patriotic. 
Just look at what happened in the weeks fol- 
lowing 9/11. 

Mr. Rowland went on to say "yellow nb- 
bons do not help the troops in Afghanistan or 
Iraq." Again, I must disagree, and for one very 
simple reason: personal experience (some- 
thing Mr. Rowland lacks). I served my coun- 
try for four and a half years in the Navy, and 
spent two different six-month deployments in 
the North Arabian Gulf during time of conflict 
with Saddam Hussein. Supporting our troops 



Control and Prevention. Atkins would have 
qualified as obese at his 6-foot-tall frame. 

This revelation has caused an uproar in 
the weight-loss and health community, forcing 
many Atkins followers to take a second look at 
their glorified diet plan. 

Atkins' widow, Veronica, released her 
own statement thereafter, citing that her hus- 
band had suffered from heart disease for years 
but said it had nothing to do with the diet he 
supported. 

Even in his death, Atkins is still sur- 
rounded by controversy. The results of Evans' 
report have brought to light some interesting 
questions. 

Is it possible to eat as much as you want, 
sans carbs, and still lose weight? Or better yet, 
lose weight in a manner that won't be detri- 
mental to your health later on? 

Atkins supporters maintain their stance 
by pointing to several short-term studies that 
show no short-temi increase in heart disease 
risks. Then again, studies on long-tenn effects 
are currently underway. 

Although these diets may seem like 
weight-loss miracles initially, the guide to 
maintaining a fit physique is far more com- 
mon sense. Forget the diets. Toss the weight- 
loss pills. The answer lies in eating smaller 
portions of healthier foods and exercising a 
few times a week. Control the food instead of 
letting it control you. To lose weight, change 
your lifestyle. 

However, in a society where people have 
become far too lazy to put in the effort, these 
low-carb diets are here to slay - at least until the 
next weight-loss phenomenon rolls around. 



by displaying flags and nbbons is the nghl 
thing to do. It's because of those troops thai 
our nation has the many freedoms it does, and 
Brett has the freedom to be ignorant. 

Mr. Rowland probably doesn't remem- 
ber (because he was in grade school) back in 
1991, during the original Gulf War, any troop 
that was ever interviewed expressed their 
appreciation for the Amencan public showing 
support for them with yellow nbbons. That is 
Mr. Rowland's major downfall; he speaks of 
things he knows nothing about. 

Here's my suggestion to Mr. Rowland 
and others who share his opinion about it not 
being necessary to support our troops: join 
the military, and see for yourself that it really 
does make a difference when someone puts an 
American flag sticker on their car. Because 
spending one dollar on a sticker and taking 
the five seconds to place it on your window 
shows that you love your country and support 
your troops. 

Cory Hughes 
Veleran 
Senior 
English 



Visit the Echo online at 



www.clunet.edu/echo 



tnjtf ^oi-h© 



10 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



February 25, 2004- 



Race to the play-offs is nail-biter 
for Kingsmen basketball team 




Photograph by Kyle Pcicrson 
Freshman Brandon Bush breaks away with the ball 
and lays it in to score another two points for the team. 
By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
Kingsmen basketball team defeated the 
Whittier Poets but lost to Claremonl in 
league play last week. 

On Wednesday, Feb. 18, the Kingsmen 



defeated the Poets 76-73, improving lo 18- 
4 overall and 9-2 in the league. 

The Kingsmen pulled away early and 
led 43-27 at halftime. CLU had a 20-point 
lead with lf> minutes lo go. Whittier cut 
the deficit to one point, 69-68, as one of 
the Poets drained a three-pointer, with only 
a couple minutes remaining in the game. 

The last time Whittier was to score 
was -with another three-point shot at 18 
seconds, which put the score at 74-73. 
Junior Matt Adame eventually sealed the 
win, nailing both his free throws lo give 
the Kingsmen a three-point lead with a few 
desperate seconds left. 

The Poets made one last unsuccessful 
attempt lo tie the game with a three, but the 
game ended without a last minute basket, 
76-73. 

"We just got away from what we were 
doing in the First half, but we were able 
to maintain and finish with a win," said 
junior Matt McCann. 

Senior Zareh Avedian led the 
Kingsmen with 23 points, five rebounds 
and three steals. Avedian is now ranked 
ninth in the nation in scoring. 

"Our focus was on stopping Chris 
Wighl, and we succeeded," Avedian said. 

McCann had ten points and seven 
rebounds, which was a team high. 

The learn is still undefeated at home 
(13-0). 

The Kingsmen's four-game winning 
streak was broken Saturday, Feb. 21, 
against Claremont-Mudd-Scripps despite 




An excited senior Zareh Avedian e 



Photograph by Kyle Pcicrson 
helped up off the floor. Avedian led the Kingsmen with 25 points. 

four players scoring in double figures. 

The Kingsmen traveled to Claremont, 
where they were defeated with a score of 
63-73. CLU is now 18-5 overall and 9-3 



in the league. 

"We weren't aggressive enough, and 
our rebounding wasn't there," Adame 
said. 

Claremont out-rebounded the 
Kingsmen 40-33, and had 14 offensive 
rebounds compared to CLU*s eight. 



"We didn't play with much emotion. 
Mentally we weren't there," Avedian 
said. 

Sophomore Alex Minney led the 
Kingsmen with 1 5 points and eight 
rebounds. Avedian had 12 points and three 
blocks. Adame also had 12 points, and 
freshman Brandon Bush had 1 1 points. 

Stats were not available at press time 
for the Pomona-Pitzer game on Monday, 
Feb. 23. 



Regals add two more conference wins 



By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's basketball learn advanced to 12- 
1 1 overall, and 8-4 in league after defeat- 
ing Occidental antl La Verne in two league 
games last week. 

On Tuesday. Feb. 1 7, the Regals 
defeated ihe Occidental Tigers (11-12. 5- 
7) 70-54. 

Senior Julie Cichon had a double- 
double with 15 points and 12 rebounds. 

"Julie has been really steady through- 
out the whole season. She has hit big shots 
in all the games at key moments.'* coach 
Kristy Hopkins said. 

Sophomore Lauren Slrool also had 
a double-double with 25 points and 1 1 
rebounds. Sophomore Alex Mallen had 
five assists in the victory. . 

"The team is playing with deterniina- 




Phoiograph by Kyle Pcicrson 
Junior Barbara Levale passes the ball around her defender to find open player sophomore Katy Svennungsen. 

tion. They kept their focus throughout the eled to La Verne (14-9. 7-5) and defeated 
game," Hopkins said. the Leopards 70-60, dropping them to 

On Friday, Feb. 20, the Regals trav- fourth place in the league. 



La Verne trailed by 20 points toward 
the end of the first half. 38-18, but they 
made a comeback to tie the game 52-52 
with eight minutes left in play. Strool 
scored eight points in an 11-4 run to put 
the game away for the Regals. 

The Regals have now won six of their 
last seven games. 

"We finally learned how lo win and found 
out what it lakes to win." said Hopkins. 

Stroot was the top scorer for the 
Regals with 17 points. Sophomore Katy 
Svennungsen was second, scoring 15 
points and grabbing six rebounds. 

The Regals shot 44 percent for the 
game, while La Verne only shot 42 per- 
cent. 

"We knew that they were a second 
half learn, so we knew we had to come out 
and play hard in the second half." Cichon 
said. "We just ran everything smoothly." 

"We executed our plays really well. 
We also rebounded well." Stroot said. 



Men's tennis dominates the Poets 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



On Friday, Feb. 20, the Whittier 
College Poets (0-6, 0-4) visited Thousand 
Oaks to play against the No. 12 nation- 
ally ranked California Lutheran University 
Kingsmen tennis team (3-2, 2-1 ). 

The Kingsmen did not drop more than 
one game in singles and did not drop a sin- 
gle game in doubles to the Poets, finishing 
with a score of 7-0. 

Sophomore Karlo Arapovic, who 
played No. 6 for the Kingsmen, was one 



of the players who did not drop one game 
to the Poets in singles and doubles. "We 
knew that we were going to dominate, and 
we did," Arapovic said. 

No. 1 singles Quinn Calderon (No. 
38 nationally) defeated David Navasolov, 
6-1, 6-0. No. 2 singles James Vallejos 
defeated Brian McSorley, 6-0, 6-0 and No. 
3 singles Shara Surabi defeated Nick Zehr, 
6-1,6-0. 

In doubles play, No. T Calderon 
and Ryan Felix defeated Navasolov 
and McSorley, 8-0. No. 2 Vallejos and 
Arapovic defeated Zehr and Choi, 8-0 and 



No. 3 Ben Staley and Joel Wetherholm 
defeated Hiranandani and Le Ylane, 8-0. 

The Kingsmen, who were sched- 
uled to play a doubleheader against the 
Occidental College Tigers and also the 
Chapman University Panthers at home on 
Saturday, Feb. 21, were unable to play due 
to rain. 

Some of the Kingsmen knew it was 
going to rain this weekend, so after the 
match against the Poets, they played 
among themselves to practice for the 
tough weekend ahead. They will play 
away against the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 



Staggs on Saturday, Feb. 28. 

"Whittier didn't really give us a big 
problem and I think that playing against 
teammates is a much better idea to get ready 
for the match on Saturday," Calderon said. 
Head coach Mike Gennette was the one 
that put them to play right after the Whittier 
match was over since the match was done in 
less than two hours. "We will definitely be 
working hard for the first part of the week, 
and then we will focus on winning the match 
against Claremont. Claremont won SCIAC 
last year and we definitely don't want to see 
that happen again," Gennette said. 



■aijTE ^lOjJJffi 



February 25, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo H 



Baseball plays through rain to 
defeat the Whittier Poets, 13-11 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Junior pitcher Lionel Carrizales brings the heat 
againt the Poets, Saturday, Feb. 21. 



Photograph by Dan Norton 
Sophomore pitcher Matt Hirsh and coach are deep in thought during the game against the Whittier Poets. 

half of the ninth, the Poets tallied four runs 
to make the score 11-10. Then at the bot- 
tom of the ninth, sophomore third basemen 
Christian Hariot smashed a three-run homer 
to bring in the win for the Kingsmen. 

"Even though we were down, we never 
felt that we were out. We picked it up a notch 
and we were able to pull out a victory," junior 
Roy Riley said. 

Hariot finished two for four with five 



The Kingsmen baseball team (4-5, 1-0) 
won the first game of a doubleheader with a 
three-run homer at the bottom of the ninth 
inning on Saturday, Feb. 21, against the 
Whittier Poets (1-5, 0-1). 

Despite the rain, the teams battled it out. 
The Kingsmen were victorious, beating the 
Poets 13-11. 

The Kingsmen lead 10-7, but in the first 



RBI's. Riley also had a three-run home 
run. Junior infielder Clay Alarcon had three 



RBI's. Starting pitcher sophomore Matt 
Hirsh went 6.2 innings and gave up two runs 
on six hits, but struck out 10. He struck out 
six between the second and third innings. 
Freshmen pitcher Nathan Cusick took the 
win for the Kingsmen. 

"As a team, we always believe we can 
win. No matter who is up to bat, we know 
something great is going to happen. These 
guys came through for us and we got that 
win we know we should have. It was a 
perfect example of Cal Lu baseball; we may 
be down but we are never out," junior Nick 
Bjork said. 

The second game of the doubleheader 
was called because of darkness, but the 
Kingsmen were leading 16-5 after five 
innings. The game will be made up later. 

The Kingsmen also had a game against 
Whittier on Fnday, Feb. 20, but it was post- 
poned due to darkness. 

"The bull pen wasn't as strong as we 
expected it to be (against the Poets), but 
our defense picked it up and our offense 
got the runs back. This was our first 
weekend of SCIAC play and we did pret- 
ty well. We are optimistic about the rest of 
the season," junior Jon Calmes said. 



Coach Rich Rider celebrates 300th win 




SCIAC title in 2001 and has finished second 
in the league six times. He has led the squad 
to an impressive 94-42 (.691) record vs. con- 
ference opponents. In 2001, Rider became the 
program's all-time winningest coach. During 
the 1996-97 season, he reached the 50-win 
plateau faster than any of the nine coaches 
before him. 



Photograph by Kyle Peterson 

Coach Rich Rider keeps his team focused at half time. His 300th win came after beating Caltech, 92-43. 

opponent Caltech. 

Now in his 1 9th season as a head coach, 
Rider has amassed a 300-186 overall record, 
good for a .6 1 7 winning percentage. He is cur- 
rently in his tenth season at Cal Lutheran and 
spent nine years at Chapman in Orange, Calif, 
prior to taking over the Kingsmen program. 



By Scott Flanders 

Sports information director 

Cal Lutheran men's basketball head coach 
Rich Rider reached a milestone February 
14 as he collected his 300th career victory 
with a 92-43 win over Southern California 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) 



Under Rider's tutelage, CLU won the 



Rich Rider Year-by-Year 




1973-74 


Chapman, 


11-15 


1974-75 


Chapman, 


16-10 


1975-76 


Chapman, 


16-12 


1976-77 


Chapman, 


17-10 


1977-78 


Chapman, 


19-10 


1978-79 


Chapman, 


15-11 


1979-80 


Chapman, 


9-16 


1980-81 


Chapman, 


18-9 


1981-82 


Chapman, 


15-11 


1994-95 


Cal Lutheran, 


17-8 


1995-96 


Cal Lutheran, 


19-6 


1996-97 


Cal Lutheran, 


17-8 


1997-98 


Cal Lutheran, 


15-10 


1998-99 


Cal Lutheran, 


10-15 


1999-00 


Cal Lutheran, 


14-10 


2000-01 


Cal Lutheran, 


19-7 


2001-02 


Cal Lutheran, 


20-5 


2002-03 


Cal Lutheran, 


16-9 


2003-04 


Cal Lutheran, 


17-4 




Coach Rich Rider enjoys his celebration t 
fans and some of the CLU cheerleaders. 



Intramural soccer 



February 29 

Game#l (8p.m.) 
Soul Glow vs. Gallinas 
Beardo Express (Bye) 

Game #2 (9p.m.) 

Vons Strikers vs. Kwamura 
Hakuna Matatah (Bye) 

Game #3 (10 p.m.) 
Winner game #1 vs. 
Beardo Express 



Game#4(]lp.m.) 
Winner game #2 vs. 
Hakuna Matatah 

March 3 

Championship 

Game 

(10p.m.) 
Winner game #3 vs. 
Winner game #4 




'I 



Get the Best Dates and find the person you Deserve with the Right Photo! 
It's Easy! We'll replace your existing Online Photo with a Professorial Portrait that 
will Guarantee your Pcture will go from Meek to Sleek! If you don't have a picture yet, IX ' 
call us for your new Online Portrait. First impressions are everything! A Picture is worth a 1000 words! 
Package includes: 
• Half Hour Portrait Session • 20-25 Online Photo proofs 
• 2 final Photos lormatted & retouched for your online service emailed to you 
• Free Cuslom 8 x 10" • Available in Color and Black & White. ONLY $125 Reg. S299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

you're going to find a dale on Ihe Web, you better have a really good picture"-The New York Times 

HEADSHOT HIGHWAY mm A 

Portraits for Online Dating ... I I '•' 



Gta JKDM® 



12 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



February 25, 2004 



Regal softball team 
defeated by the rain 




Starling pitcher freshman Ashley Calendo tries to keep ht 
gals phnvii ihn>it«h the ruin on Sutunlav \ doiihlehead cr 
By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 

The Regals softball team opened its 
season with one loss and a tie against the 
University of Redlands Bulldogs. The 
team now ranks 1-6 overall and 0-1 in 
the conference. 

The second game of Saturday's 
doubleheader at home resulted in a 4-4 
tie. which ended due to darkness, after 
11 innings. Sophomore pitcher Gianna 
Regal pitched the entire game and posted 
eight strikeouts. Senior infielder Emily 
Otineru posted three hits and two runs. 
The game will continue at a later date, as 
there are no ties in SCIAC competition, 
according to Head Coach and Assistant 
Athletics Director Debbie Day. 

The first game ended in a 10-6 loss 
for the Regals. Senior outfielder Shannon 
Teverbaugh hit two RBI's and one run. 

"I think in the first game we did not 
play to the best of our abilities," Day 
said. "We left a lot of base runners. We 
had a lot of defensive miscues. I was 
very impressed that they were able to 
turn that around in the second game." 

"The first game wasn't our best 
game," Regal said. "We struggled offen- 
sively. But in the second game, we really 
came back; we really showed some heart. 



Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
grip on the ball as she pitches to the batter. The Re- 
against Redlands 
we really impressed ourselves as a team. 
We got our defense and offense together 
and it was exciting to have something 
to fight for. We were tied pretty much 
the entire game. Overall, it was a really 
good day." 

"We had a lot of errors that were 
unnecessary," junior catcher Meagan 
Loesche said of the first game. "We 
came back and answered with six runs, 
but they weren't enough. We just weren't 
putting the ball in play. 

"To go 11 innings was a long game. 
There were crucial plays that we needed 
to execute but didn't," Loesche said. 
"Our pitcher Gianna and our catcher 
Katy both were outstanding." 

Rainy weather forced Friday's away 
game against the Bulldogs into cancel- 
lation after three innings, but it will 
resume at a later date. 

"We know the things we need to 
work on," Loesche said. "Redlands is 
one of the teams we're going to have 
to finish the two games with and finish 
strong. We're looking forward -to our 
next series." 

The Regals stay at home to face the 
University of La Verne Leopards on Feb. 
27 before leaving to face the Leopards in 
a doubleheader on Saturday Feb. 28. 



Regal tennis defeats 
Whittier Poets, 9-0 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



The No. 18 nationally ranked California 
Lutheran University Regals tennis team (4- 
1,2-1) played on Friday, Feb. 20, against the 
Whittier College Poets (0-4,0-4), defeating 
them by a score of 9-0. After having a tough 
weekend last week, the Regals were successful 
in defeating the Poets without dropping more 
than three games in every match. 

Sophomore Blair Murphy, who played 
No. 3 singles for the Regals and No. 2 doubles, 
only dropped one game in singles and only 
three games collectively with partner junior 
Lisa Novajosky in doubles play. "I'm really 
proud of the team because we were ready to 
play and we took care of business," Murphy 
said. 

The weather was a big factor this last 
weekend since the rain prevented the Regals 
from playing away against the Occidental 
College Tigers on Saturday. Feb. 2 1 . 



Coach Nancy Garrison was pleased to get 
at least one match in this weekend. 

"Myself and the Whittier coach were 
happy to get this match done with, since it is 
difficult to reschedule matches with a lot of 
matches scheduled," Garrison said. 

No. 1 singles Jen Hansen (No. 22 nation- 
ally) defeated Vika Soshina 6-0, 6-2. No. 
2 singles Lisa Novajosky defeated Kristin 
Fnedersdorf 6-1, 6-1. No. 3 singles Blair 
Murphy defeated Hanna Hilligoss 6-0, 6- 1 . 

In doubles play. No. 1 doubles Hansen 
and Rebecca Hunau defeated Friedersdorf 
and Soshina 8-2. No. 2 doubles Novajosky 
and Murphy defeated Hilligoss and Crandall 
8-3, and No. 3 doubles Perkins and Smalling 
defeated Komomua and Tsuda 8-2. 

Thanks to the weather, the Regals got a 
little time off that was good for some of the 
players. Novajosky enjoyed the idea of a day 
off. " I definitely needed to catch up on home- 
work and hang out watching TV and doing 
random stuff, " Novajosky said. 



Sports Blotter 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



Lacrosse 

The Lacrosse team took on Hayward 
on Sunday, Feb. 15. The Hayward 
Pioneers beat the California Lutheran 
Knights 17-4. 

There was another injury to the 
team. Junior RJ Key had to leave the 
game early do to re-injurytng the same 
shoulder that he previously hurt in the 
first game. 

"This time around we made a lot of 
improvements, however there are still more 
improvements to be made. We hope that by the 
end of the season we will be a top contender." 
junior Mike Cabral said. 

The goals were scored by junior 
Aaron Collins, junior Chris Bumble, 
freshman Steve Page and freshman John 
Rische. 

Track 

The track team had their first meet 
of the season on Saturday, Feb. 21, at 
Pomona-Pitzer. 

Sophomore Adrian Cruz had three 
personal bests: 40 feet, nine inches in the 
shot put, along with 1 14 feet iri the discus 
and 128 feet, five inches in the hammer. 
Junior Michael Alexander completed the 
100 meter race in 11.0 seconds and com- 
pleted the 200 meter race in 22.3 seconds. 
Senior Dereem McKinney had a personal 
record of 27 feet, four inches in the shot 
put. Sophomore Heather Worden finished 



the 3000 meter race in ten minutes, 55 
seconds. 

"We had ten personal bests this week- 
end. It was our first meet of the season and 
the conditions weren't that great, but we 
are still off to a great start," Coach Scott 
Fickerson said. 

Diving 

The diving team competed in ihe 
finals on Feb. 19-20. Junior Ashleigh 
Poulin was the only diver competing. 

Poulin competed in the one meter 
and three meter diving events. She took 
first in the one meter diving event, win- 
ning by 17 points. 

Poulin also took first in the three 
meter diving event, winning by two 
points. 

"It was very hard to be the only 
[CLU] diver competing in the finals, 
but 1 knew 1 had the team behind me Ihe 
whole time, and in the end it paid off," 
Poulin said. 

Rugby 

The California Lutheran University 
rugby team took on Westmont Saturday, 
Feb. 21, at Westmont College. 

It was a tough game for the CLU 
rugby team as they lost to Westmont, 
23-17. 

The goals were scored by junior 
Micah Hamilton, freshman Joey Stien 
and freshman Kyle Laubach. 

"We could have beaten them, but we 
just had some mental errors that really 
cost us the game," junior Shawn Daniels 
said. 




You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ B.A, I iberal Studies lor paraeducators 

■ M. Id. readier Preparation 

■ M.S.Special I ducation 

■ M. A. Curriculum & Instruction 

■ M.A. Educational Administration 

■ M.S. Counseling and Guidance 

■ Pupil Personnel Services 

■ College Student Personnel 

■ I d.D. Educational I eadership 



5 



Program in - tedilci '. WASC 



„ A a n 



You are invited 




Grad 



njii:MKin 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



Call Jot more information 
Seating >■ limited and resi rvaiioni art re am I I 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angeles 
clugrad@clunet.edu ■ www.clunet.edu/Graduate 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 17 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



March 3, 2004 



Sports 

CLU basketball says goodbye 
to seniors with a win. 



See story page 7 



Features 

Cal Lutheran students take part in Ash Wednesday 
Concert to commemorate beginning of Lent. 



See story page 5 



News 

Security Alert! 

Five car burglaries on campus 

in one day. 

See story page 3 



CLU holds Service Day 2004 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



Students, faculty and staff participated 
in California Lutheran University's biannual 
Service Day on Saturday, Feb. 28. 

"The time we spent [at 
the teen center] assured 
me that we were keeping 
teens off the street..." 



Casey Overby 
Freshman 

Volunteers took part in a variety of 
activities, including painting murals at the 
Gull Wings Children's Museum, visiting a 
transitional home for the homeless, making 
blankets for orphans in Thailand and Mexico 
and helping out with a Special Olympics ice- 
skating tournament. 

Volunteers also participated in the beau- 
tification and landscaping of residence halls 
on campus. 

"The goal of Service Day is to foster a 
sense of civic responsibility and self-pride 
among participants while helping people in 
need," according to the CLU Web site. 

"I knew my time was well-spent when 



some of the residents thanked us for what we 
were doing and one offered to help us out," 
said freshman Kari Uthus, who volunteered to 
plant flowers on campus. "Even though all I 
did was plant flowers, I think the residents will 
appreciate what we did. and that is all the justi- 
fication I need for what 1 did for them." 

Freshman Ashley Hubbard volunteered 
at a transitional home, where she and other 
volunteers prepared lunches for homeless 
families. Volunteers also gave some of the 
female residents manicures and played with 
the children staying in the home. 

"Even though we were only there for 
a few hours, I think that interacting with the 
homeless by talking to them and doing activi- 
ties with them really proved to them that some- 
one cared," Hubbard said. 

Freshman Casey Overby volunteered at a 
center for teens. 

"The time we spent there assured me that 
wc were keeping teens off the streets and giv- 
ing them something to do," Overby said^ 

In an activity new to the Service Day 
lineup, volunteers assisted participants in a 
Special Olympics ice-skating tournament. 

The tournament, which took place at the 
Oxnard Skating Center, gave volunteers an 
opportunity to interact with people suffering 
from mental disabilities. 

Volunteers helped set up the tournament; 
they also coached participants and judged 




Pholi>j;i',ipli t>v .li'imittT M;iin 

Cal Lutheran volunteers take time out from painting with some new 
friends. 



competitions. 

The activities took place throughout the 
day, and in most cases volunteers were pro- 
vided with refreshments. 



Volunteers received a complimentary T- 
shirt commemorating Service Day 2004 and 
the satisfaction of knowing that they helped to 
better the community. 



Presidential Scholars visit Cal Lutheran 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



Seventy-five prospective students arrived 
at California Lutheran University's annual 
Presidential Scholarship Competition on 
Sunday, Feb. 29. High school seniors from 
across the country and world traveled to CLU 
to compete for scholarships. 

Students this year came from as close as 
three miles away, in Thousand Oaks, Calif, 
to as far as Nepal, Vietnam, El Salvador and 
Guatemala. 

Presidential Scholar Weekend has been a 
scholarship opportunity each year for incom- 
ing freshmen. 

According to the Admissions office, 65 
percent of the scholarship candidates end up 
attending CLU the following year. 

"I think the scholarship is beneficial for 
CLU because it encourages top tier students to 
come here. This will, in turn, raise both class 
quality and test scores," 2002 Presidential 
Scholarship winner Kacey Backney said. 

The weekend started off with a welcome 
dinner at which all of the CLU Admissions 
counselors were introduced and the weekend's 
itinerary was reviewed. After the dinner, the 
scholars attended the Lord of Life worship 
service. This year, the students were also 
invited to attend New West's hall program. 




Photograph hy Stephanie Shaker 



Several Presidential Scholar students begin the process of checking into 
CLU for the weekend. 



"Progressive Desserts," and to watch the 
Academy Awards. 

Scholars had their competition interviews 
March 1 . Each scholar was interviewed twice, 
first by a member of CLU 's faculty, and then 
by a CLU administrator and a CLU student. 
Responses are scored on a point system and 
the students are ranked. 



The top two scholars, based on interview 
points received, are awarded full tuition to 
CLU. The next four scholars in rank are 
awarded three-quarter tuition scholarships. 
The rest are awarded individually with differ- 
ent amounts; however, no scholar walks away 
with less than $10,000 in scholarships. 

The weekend ended with a trip to 



Universal Citywalk to dine at Buca di Beppo, 
an Italian restaurant. Scholars were then 
allowed to explore Citywalk for an hour. 

A lot goes into planning Presidential 
Scholar Weekend. CLU's Admission office 
plans the weekend from start to finish. 
Counselor Allison Pilmer heads up the team 
and makes sure everything runs smoothly. The 
Admission interns help by doing everything 
from helping pick up scholars at the airport 
and checking them in to taking them on tours 
of the campus. 

"The most rewarding part of this event for 
me is coming back the following year and see- 
ing them as CLU students," Admission intern 
Beckie Lewis said. 

The Admission interns were also in 
charge of housing the students. This year, 39 
rooms on the east side of campus volunteered 
to open their doors to the scholars. Many 
rooms housed more than one student. 

"We volunteered to host Pres. Scholars 
because we like meeting new people, and 
since we all really like CLU, we wanted to 
make sure they got a good perception of the 
school," freshman Michelle SekyTa said. 

The scholars returned home March 2, and 
they will be notified of the results by the end 
of the month. 



®3S5 "finiM® 



The Echo 



Calendar 



MARCH 3, 2004 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

march 3 




Worship - Ash Wednesday 

Chape! 
10:10a.m. 

Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 

march 4 

Matthews Leadership Forum 

Gym 
5 p.m. 




Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Mogen Hall Lounge 

6 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball - Mandatory 
Captains Meeting 

Nygreen I 

7 p.m. 

Intramural Indoor Soccer 
Championship Game 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 

friday 

march 5 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 






Club LU: Lip Sync 

Forum 
9 p.m. 

Saturday 

march 6 



Creative Options - A Day for Women 

Gym 



Sunday 

march 7 

Intramural Softball ~ r~\ 
Varsity Softball Field \^f 
10 a.m. 



University Symphony 

Scherr Forum Theater 
3 p.m. 



Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym t^^ 

9 p.m. 



monday 

march 8 







ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 



CLU Athletics to host Nutrition Speaker 
Friday, March 5 @ 10 a.m. in the Chapel Lounge 



-ia — &- 



Leslie Bond, the Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, will speak on the issues of athletic performance, eating disorders, weight management, and supple- 
ments. Bond's visit is part of an eight-campus tour of CLU's athletic conference and is being made possible by an NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Speakers Grant program. 



classifieds 

Employment Needed: Kelly Kurtz & Mollie 

Ruble, iwo Cal Lu students are looking for a 

house sitting job over the summer. Kelly will be 

a senior, and is majoring in biology. She works 

at an Optometry office & will be taking the 

Kaplan course for the MCAT over the summer. 

Mollie will also be a senior, and is majoring in 

Criminal Justice. She is a waitress in Westlake 

Village, and will be taking summer school at Cal 

Lutheran University over the summer. 

II interested, call or email: 

(805) 241-2365 

knikurtz@clunel.edu and/or 

mkruble@clunet.edu 

House for Rent: In Thousand Oaks. 3+2, gar- 
deners included, S2I98 a month. Short term 
okay. 

If interested, call 
(805) 778-0867 or (805) 907-9701 

For rent: Studio apt in TO. Full bathroom, 

new fridge, new microwave, non-smoker and 

no pets allowed. S 1 ,000/month. 

If interested, call: 

(805) 857-0503 

Tutors Needed: $15-S18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one. in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required. Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SATI/1I.GRE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310)282-6424 

or email resume to: 

instructorhiring6@acceducation.com 

Homework Help: For high school student in 
Oxnard area. Once a week. S20/hr. 

If interested, contact Cruz at: 
(805)493-3219 

For Sale: A Sears 52" Screen TV. In excellent 
condition. Asking $500. 

If interested, contact Carolline at: 
(805)987-3453 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES' 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800- $3500+ for the sun- 
nier working with children outdoors ! 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



Where are YOU going? 

Come find our more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 or x3750 

srudyabroad@c/unef.edu 

Open Mon - Fri., 77:30-7:20 



For 



Sale: Parakeets Asking 
If interested, comae! Carollin 
(805) 987-J453 



Salary Negotiations 

Thursday. March 4. 2004 at 



HfcliroliilBiiMr TvTTa^oi'iiiu 



Do you know what you're worth? 
Do you even know how to find out? 
Well, you're not alone. Learn some- 
thing new and increase your value! 
Research your worth and know how 
to respond to salary requests without 
losing your negotiating power. You 
can research this topic all you want, 
but practice is essential-so come 
join us! Topics will include how to 
conduct salary research, references 
for employer/applicant discussions, 
and diversion/postponement tac- 
tics. Additional topics covered will 
include how to give an employer 
a salary range, salary history 
(BEWARE), and alternate forms of 
compensation (i.e., medical ben- 
efits, time off, stock options, etc.) 



CAREER EXPO 2004 



On Wed. March 10th 
trom 10am to 2pm 



<Z^Z^ In Quad area near the 
flagpole along the 
planters. 



jJ"^N^ In case of rain, the Expo 
>s£33S£^ Huma 
^||& under 



be moved to the 
umanities lobbies, Science lobby, and outside 
a tent between the two areas. 



All students must register 
in order to receive their required name badge. 

To register, jiuit email your name, phone number, email addrej.i, major e3 grad date to: 

Cynthia Smith, Career Counselor/Recruitment Coordinator at 

csmith@clunet.edu 

The CLU Career Expo 2004 is sponsored by Career Services. 
If any questions, they can be contacted at (805) 493-3196. 



BOO, you've )ust been WAIED 

If you want to find out what that is and other intriguing aspects of 
Thailand come on over for Thai Night on 

March 10th in Nygreen 1 between 6-8 pm 
for Thailand snacks and a night of fun! 



Asian Club and Friends 



Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and FRIENDS 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori, president 

(818) 590-7625 



Classified ads can be placed 
on trie Calendar page for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and clarity. 
Call: 
(8Q5) -W-5565 



FREE SUPPORT CROUP for Eating Disorder Recoverers 



Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the F-Building 

Sponsored by the CLU Counseling Center and Marriage, Family 
Child Center, in conjunction with the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). 

For more information, please feel free to call or email me or log onto: 
http;/^w.ww.altnje.net/site/anAdw£b/ 

ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 
Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW , Ext: 3390 ccollettgiclunet.edu 



CLU SEMESTER at 
RIMBACH, GERMANY 

Applications are now being 
received for a semester of study 
abn >ad at the Martin I .uthcr Schulc 
in Rirnbach. Germany. This CI. I' 
program allows you to enroll at 
CLU. keep your financial aid, and 
spend a full semester as a student 
and teaching assistant at this 
distinguished German academy. 

\pplieati:>n f:>rms arc available 
from Drs.YValter Stewart and 
Paula Kgnatchik in the German 
department or from Randy Toland. 
1 1 umanities Secretary. The dead- 
line to apply for fall semester. 
2004 is Friday, March 12. 2004. 

Tor more information, ple.i.se see Pr. 

Li»n.ircriilc, Dr. W.ilfer Sfew.irf . or 

Pr. Herbert Gooch, 

Director of Studu Abroad. 



SlHe T&ma® 



March 3, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Career Services holds resume workshop 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



Career Services hosted a resume-writ- 
ing workshop to help students and alumni 
improve their resumes. The workshop was 
held on Feb. 24 in the Nelson Room and 
was the second in a scries of career work- 
shops being offered by Career Services. 

Cynthia Smith, career counselor, said 
that the purpose of the workshop was "to 
provide students and alumni with tools to 
create a resume or improve their existing 
resume." 

Undergraduates, graduate students. 
ADEP students and alumni attended the 
workshop. 

Smith addressed topics such as "types 
of resumes and their uses, resume format 
and content, using action verbs and pre- 
senting internship and volunteer work," 
she said. 

In addition, she briefly discussed 
cover letters, references, recommenda- 
tions and thank-you letters. 

At the end of the workshop, stu- 
dents and alumni who had prepared 
resumes presented them to Smith for 
a critique. 

"[The] resume writing workshop 
is one that we offer every semester. We 
encourage students to put one together 
early so they can update it on an ongoing 
basis with the activities that help build 
their experience," Smith said. 

"With the Career Expo coming up 
and the printing of the resume books 




Photograph by kyle l.jub 

Career Counselor Cynthia Smith guides students 
and alumni through the process of making a 



that we offer to employers, having the Offers," will be 



workshop available allows students to 
get all the information at one time," 
Smith said. 

All workshops are available free of 
charge to students and alumni. The 
next workshop, "Interviewing for 



held on Tuesday, 
March 2, at 5:30 
p.m. in Overton 
Hall. 

Interested 



Attendees listen intently during the lecture. 

by emailing Smith at csmith(<i;clunct.edu 




You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ HA. I iberal Studies lor paraeducators 

■ M. Id. readier Preparation 

■ M.S.Special Fiducation 

■ M.A. Curriculum & Instruction 

■ M.A. Educational Administration 

■ M.S. ( )ounselinj» and Guidance 

■ Pupil Personnel Services 

■ College student Personnel 

■ Ed.D. I ducational Leadership 

\ ■:■:■■ 1 ' I 

1 1 1 : ■: r ■ 



You are invited 

Grad 




HJIIZHHUI 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



11 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angeles 
clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/Graduate 



students and alumni may register online or by calling Career Services at x3 1 96. 

Security Alert 



By Klay Peterson 
Security Release 



On Wednesday, Feb. 25, between the 
hours of midnight and 10 a.m., five vehicle 
burglaries occurred in the parking lot behind 
Janss and Afton Halls. In each case the sus- 
pects entered the vehicles by force, gaining 
entry through the driver's side window. 

The suspects walked onto campus via the 
hilly, undeveloped area behind the Janss/Afton 
Hall parking lots. A search of the hillside 
resulted in the location of some of the stolen 
equipment. An expanded search of the area 
also resulted in the location of the suspects' 
vehicle, which was parked on Momingstar St. 
just off of Olsen Road. Numerous items stolen 
from student vehicles were confiscated pursu- 
ant to a search of the vehicle. 



The suspects took stereo equipment, 
CDs, clothing, phone accessones, cash and 
credit cards. 

One of the possible suspects may have 
been wearing cowboy boots. 

Suspect No. 1 is a white male, approxi- 
amately 25 years old, 5' 8", 165-170 pounds, 
wearing while tennis shoes, black pants and a 
greyish-blue short sleeved shirt. This suspect 
has very short light brown hair, hazel or light 
brown eyes and a blondish colored goatee. No 
scars, marks or tattoos were noted. 

At press time, there is no description of 
suspect No. 2. 

The suspect vehicle is a mid 1980s, full- 
size Chevrolet pick-up. It has a California 
license plate and is bronze in color. 

Anyone with information should contact 
Campus Safety and Secunty at 493-3208. 




ISSY's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



Navigating Long Documents Is Easy 
Using Bookmarks 

Imagine you have created a long docu- 
ment in Word, and it is difficult to remember 
where certain information is located. The 
solution to this dilemma is hidden bookmarks. 
Hidden bookmarks allow you to quickly navi- 
gate to a specific spot in the document Hidden 
bookmarks are easy to add and easy to use. 



and you can put them anywhere you want 
To add a bookmark: 

1. In your document, click where you 
want to place a bookmark. 

2. On the Insert menu, click Bookmark 

3. When the Bookmark dialog box opens, 
name your bookmark. 

4. Then click Add. 

To find your bookmark: 

1 . Press F5 to open the Find and Replace 
dialog box. 

2. Click the Go To tab and select 
Bookmark from the Go to what field. 

3. Type the bookmark name in the Enter 
bookmark name field. 

4. Click the Go To button to get to the 
information you bookmarked 

For questions about bookmarks in Word, 
please contact the Help Desk, x3698 or 
help@clunetedu. 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



March 3, 2004 



Where is the best or worst place to go for a date? 




Rob Munguia, computer science, 2004 



Jennifer Fomadley. accounting 2007 



Samantha Fried, art, 2006 



"The best place to take a date is this little "The best is going to an amusement "Third Street in Santa Monica is perfect. 

Italian restaraunt called 'Buca de Beppo' in park." You can just walk and talk." 

Citywalk." 



Ryan Cecil, business, 2006 

"The best is taking a girl to a rodeo." 




Beth Kirschner. communication, 2007 



Ally Cunningham, communication, 2007 



Jon Riley, communication, 2005 



Joe Thomas, social science, 2006 



"The best would be to have dinner, then "Some snowboarding then a hot tub "The worst thing to do for a date would "The worst thing you can do for a date is 

go eat pie on the beach!" afterwards." be to just sit there looking at each other won- forgetting her name." 

dering, 'why am I here?"' 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Claire Hillard. 



Car of the Week 




Are you ready for life after College? 

Senior Disorientation is on March 9, from 

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Nelson Room. 

Sign up in the SUB before March 3. 

Questions? 

Call Margaret Miller at x3302 



L:*«l|»]=i;hl 



Hot Nights? Cool Trips? 
Killer Deals? 



This ain't your parencs' Gravel agenctj... it's ijours. 



Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peter! 

Senior Ryan Palmer stands next to his 1973 Nova. He's running a built 
350 small block with 470 horse power, a Ford 9 inch rear end Detroit 
locker. His best elapsed time in the quarter mile is 12.5 at 114 mph. 



Think your car could 

be named 
"Car of the Week"? 

Call Kyle at x2791. 




March 3, 2004 



EEATURES 



The Echo 5 



Blessings given at Ash Wednesday concert 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



Students, faculty and commu- 
nity members gathered in the chapel 
Wednesday, Feb. 25, to receive their 
blessings and have their foreheads 
marked with ashes in the shape of a cross. 
Ash Wednesday commemorates the first 
of the 40 days of Lent. The service fea- 
tured singing by the California Lutheran 
University Choir, readings and prayers. 

Bishop Murray Finck from the 
Pacific Synod preached at the service. In 
his sermon, he talked about the Southern 
California fires and that everything was 
reduced to ashes during the disaster. He 
advised everyone to remember that in the 
end they are all ashes. 

"You are dust, and to dust you shall 



return," was the reccurring message of 
the service. After Finck spoke, everyone 
sang the hymn "Alas! And Did My Savior 
Bleed." Lenten Exhortation followed the 
discussion about the depth of God's love 
through Jesus. More hymns were sung 
while each chapel row lined up to go to 
the stations to get their foreheads marked 
with ashes and receive bread and wine. 

Rev. Melissa M. Maxwell-Doherty 
was one of the presiding ministers and 
was pleased with Wednesday's service. 

"Whenever God's word is proclaimed 
and I can taste and even know that Jesus 
loves me [and] that my sin's forgiven, I'm 
happy," Maxwell-Doherty said. 

The CLU Choir sang two Latin 
songs: "Timor Et Tremor" and "Vinea 
Mea Electa," both of which have been 
practiced since September. CLU senior 
Katie Holze is a member of the choir and 



" I thought it was cool 
because music is always 
a good part of worship, 
and I think it's important 
that the choir is 
involved." 

Katie Holze 
Senior 

enjoyed the service. 

"As long as I've been in choir, we 
haven't sang in an Ash Wednesday ser- 
vice. I like it because it tends to be one of 
the bigger ones on campus," Holze said. 
"I thought it was cool because music is 
always a good part of worship, and I think 
it's important that the choir is involved." 

"I loved hearing the CLU Choir," 



said Danielle Mier, a CLU junior. "I've 
never heard them before, but it sounded 
really pretty." 

During the season of Lent, it is com- 
mon for people to give up or abstain from 
something. There are also other ways to 
show respect. 

"I decided to add something instead 
of take away something," Holze said. "So 
this year, every day I look at a new Bible 
verse that I like, and I write it down in my 
journal, so that I can become more famil- 
iar with the Bible." 

In addition to opening the season of 
Lent, the CLU Choir will also be closing 
it. 

"Since our Spring Break is over Holy 
Week, they decided to move Holy Week 
at CLU to the week before," Holze said. 

That service will take place on March 
31. 



Book "Touching From a Distance" provides insight into Joy Division 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



The band Joy Division's tale is a hard one 
to tell. Filled with bitter memories, financial 
woes, brilliant lyrics, pioneering, naivete and 
death, the band contained all the necessary 
attributes needed to secure its now mythologi- 
cal fate. That myth-making path was predeter- 
mined by its lead singer, Ian Curtis, and was 
forever solidified when he took his own life on 
May 18, 1980. Like Sylvia Plath, Nick Drake, 
Syd Barrett and the recently departed Elliot 
Smith, Curtis' work documented his descent 
into depression and inability to face personal 
demons. 

It took 15 years for someone to recover. 

Safe Rides 
provides rides 
for all 
students 

By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writer 

A dollar can't buy you very much 
these days. With the help of Safe 
Rides, though, you can get a ride to the 
California Lutheran University campus. 

Safe Rides offers to drive students to 
CLU from any location within a 15-mile 
radius for only $1. For almost 10 years, 
the Thousand Oaks Cab Company has 
run the service for students. 

"The deal is, for $1 we'll pick you up 
from Moorpark, Agoura Hills, Westlake, 
New-bury Park and of course Thousand 
Oaks," said vice-president Alan Reer. 

The cab services don't apply to 
Simi Valley or Camarillo. Still, 15-20 
students use Safe Rides as transportation 
each weekend. 

"I got tanked at a party in Westlake 
Village last weekend and couldn't drive 
home. 1 was sitting there looking at my 
keys and saw my Safe Rides key chain. I 
called them up, and they came and got 
me," said senior Tony Perez. 

The services are Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. for 
all CLU students with an I.D. 

"We encourage everyone to be 
safe," Reer said. 

To get a ride back to campus, call 
(805) 495-3500. 



stand up and help dispel some of the myths. 
That person was lan's wife, Deborah Curtis. 
Her 1995 book, "Touching From a Distance," 
helped break the silence hovering around Joy 
Division. 

Hoping to move on with their careers, 
the former members of Joy Division became 
New Order and tried in vain to forget their 
past. Unavailable for comment for many 
years, the band was understandably bitter and 
struggled to find its identity. Factory Records, 
the unorthodox independent label that signed 
Joy Division, propelled some profitable myths 
of its own. 

While there are some inevitable biases 
and omissions in Deborah Curtis' biography 
on her late husband, it is surprisingly (and 



thankfully) suppressed for someone in her 
position. Ostracized from the band, her hus- 
band (during his brief life and, obviously, by 
his death) and left alone to care for a daughter, 
this book could have been a fiasco (had it been 
written ten years earlier, it just might have). 

The passage of time, along with hindsight, 
has inevitably smoothed over some of the bit- 
terness surrounding those involved with Joy 
Division. Deborah Curtis even had the grace 
to include quotes from sources connected, in 
some way or another, to Joy Division. While 
she often overrides any opinions that contra- 
dict her own, the quotes succeed in allowing 
readers to discern what they want to believe 
(Ian Curtis winning yet again). 



Deborah thrives in taking the romance 
out of the myth. What the reader gets out of 
"Touching From a Distance" is not a super- 
nova, romantic story, but one of sorrow at 
such naivete and squandered talent. 

Deborah describes lan's early obsession 
with James Dean, Lou Reed and David Bowie: 
all individuals who flirted with death. She also 
discusses his epileptic fits and prescription 
pills, which acted as catalysts for destruction 
on an already fragile psyche. "Touching From 
a Distance" is a reminder that Curtis not only 
left behind two of rock's greatest albums, but 
a widow, a toddler, three band mates on the 
brink of success, a mistress and unfulfilled 
potential for a permanent solution. 



Best dressed at the 76th annual Academy Awards 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



Bright hues, creams and whites were 
the most apparent colors at the 76th annual 
Academy Awards. The male guests who 
attended the awards wore classic black tuxes, 
as usual. 

The best dressed this year, without a doubt, 
goes once again to the beautiful Julia Roberts. 
Roberts showed up at Sunday's event wearing 
a champagne-colored gown with a V-shaped 
neckline and sparking silver brooch below her 
bustline. The gown also exhibited a small train. 

Other best-dressed actresses and actors 
included Renee Zellwegger, Julianne Moore, 
Sean Penn, Angelina Jolie, Will Smith, Oprah 
Winfrey, Robbin Williams and Jennifer Gamer. 



Have you taken 
a great Feature 
photo? Send it 
to the Echo with 
names and a one 
line caption and 
it could become 



Sandra Bullock was also quite stunning. 
Her makeup and jewelry were very comple- 
mentary to her white, feather-bottomed gown. 
Simple yet sheer described Liv Tyler, who pre- 
sented an award. Tyler arrived wearing a long 
black backless dress. She pulled off the retro 
look with a great set of earrings and her fantastic 
retro-looking hair-do and glasses. 

Oscar-winning actress Charlize Theron 
looked flawless, wearing an elegant sparkling 
halter dress with a cris-cross back and a medium 
length train. The pastel yellow color accentuated 
her skin tone. 

Gamer's dress was probably the most 
extravagant gown at the awards show. The 
gown was a bright orange-red off the shoulder, 
with a long cape-like train that tied at the waist 
The dress was very bold yet attractive. 

Will Smith appeared with his beautiful 



wife Jada Pinkett Smith, looking very adorable. 
He was wearing a not-so-typical, all-black tux, 
black-tie combo. 

Susan Sarandon was escorted by her sons 
and Tim Robbins, who took home an Oscar. 
Sarandon wore a simple yet sheer, long, flowy 
black gown to the event. Once again, she man- 
aged to keep herself reserved but always styl- 
ish. 

Zellwegger dared to break the mold by 
wearing a white strapless dress with a huge gor- 
geous origami-like bow at the back. 

To complete this year's best dressed list is 
Nicole Kidman. She wore a silver form-fitting 
dress that was adorned with knitting at the bust- 
line and at the hem. 

Big bows and long trains were key to the 
most fabulous dresses this year at the Academy 
Awards. 



Questions? 
Call x3465 



(A (Beautiful Load 

rull-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805) 492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time ol the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

4ll R \ venue Ue Lm Albulcs in llimiyjnd Oaks 
N«n Rite Aid and Whole Finals 



W-Mla ^<!IJf(© 



The Echo 



OPINION 



March 3, 2004 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@elunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 



Aristide disposed, again 




By Brett C. Rowland 
Editor In Chief 



Stories came over the wires heavy and 
fast in what turned out to another strange 
week in news. Most significant is Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide's recent distinction of being 
the only president to be disposed twice. In an 
unprecedented use of public diplomacy, the 
president of the United States (the "Leader 
of the Free World") called for a democrati- 
cally elected foreign president to step down in 
order to avoid violence. The oil-rich Texan's 
sudden aversion to the bloodshed of foreign- 
ers is surprising; Bush usually foams at the 
mouth and jumps right in at the first mention 
of violence — like a shark at the first taste of 
blood. But alas, I digress — the point is that 



the United States, the world's largest exporter 
of democracy, has helped to oust a democrati- 
cally elected president. 

Further discussion on Haiti requires that 
we revisit the U.S.'s past relations with this 
poverty-stricken nation. In 1803, the U.S. 
opposed the Haitian revolution for indepen- 
dence from France. The U.S. and other nations 
(including France and Spain) feared an inde- 
pendent nation whose "principle leaders are 
colored men," according to a memo sent to 
the U.S. secretary of state by the Spanish 
minister. 

In 1915, more than 100 years later, the 
United States intervened in Haiti for a second 
time, this time in order to prevent conflicts 
and ensure friendly relations. American troops 
occupied Haiti for the next 19 years. In 1990. 
the United States, convinced that Marc Bazin 
(a former World Bank official) would win, 
supported democratic elections in Haiti. Bazin 
lost to Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who won with a 
landslide victory; Aristide received 67 percent 
of the vote (more than Bush did in 2000). 

A year later, in a coup d'etat led by 
General Cedras, Aristide is forced into exile. 
The U.S. intervenes for a fourth time three 
years later in 1994, leading a U.N. multi- 



nation force to ensure the peaceful return 
of Aristide. It is worth noting that Aristide's 
peaceful return was helped in large part by 
the diplomatic activities of Colin Powell who 
encouraged the Haitian military leaders to 
relinquish power to Aristide. Sunday, Bush 
and Powell called for Aristide to step down 
and sent in the Marines — marking the U.S.'s 
fifth intervention in Haiti. 

Scrutiny of the U.S.'s involvement in 
Haitian affairs seems to show that American 
influence has been largely unsuccessful in that 
country. Despite promises to the contrary in his 
2000 presidential campaign. Bush seems to be 
in the business of "nation building." Currently, 
the U.S. military occupies two countries, Iraq 
and Afghanistan, both of which are being 
coached in the art of democracy. 

! hope and encourage for a short American 
military presence in Haiti. U.S. troops should 
contain the recent outbreaks of violence and 
leave at once after stability is ensured. 

The United States should wait until Iraq 
and Afghanistan secure effective constitu- 
tions and representative governments — that 
promote significant advancements in human 
rights — before attempting to bring democ- 
racy to Haiti. 



Nation divided over gay marriage 



By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



Last Tuesday, President George W. Bush 
advocated for a constitutional amendment that 
would require marriage in the United States to be 
defined as the union between a man and a woman. 
In his remarks. Bush cited the recent flood of gay 
marriages in San Francisco. 

"If we are to prevent the meaning of marriage 
from being changed forever, our nation must enact 
a constitulional amendment to protect marriage in 
America." Bush said. "Decisive and democratic 
action is needed because attempts to redefine mar- 
riage in a single state or city could have serious 
consequences throughout the counlry." 

Officials in the city began issuing same-sex 
marriage licenses on Thursday, Feb. 12, outside 
city hall. Demand for same-sex licenses were so 
great that officials had to turn away many gay and 
lesbian couples who had lined up outside the hall 
for hours. In a blatant attempt to show her distaste 
for the president's comments, comedian Rosie O' 
Donnell flew into the Bay Area to wed her long- 
time partner Kelli Carpenter on Thursday, Feb. 26. 
The debate over the legalization of gay marriages 
has been thrust into the national spotlight, essen- 
tially dividing the nation into those who support 
the issue and those who strive to conserve the term 
"marriage" for heterosexuals. According to a poll 
conducted by Time Magazine, 62 percent of people 
who responded said they oppose the legalization of 



same-sex marriage, while less than a third favors 
it. President Bush's position clearly sides with the 
majority of Americans: marriage should be between 
a man and a woman. Well, count me in the minority. 
Marriage should have no boundaries as long as it is 
taken seriously, which is more than can be said for 
50 percent of Americans who end up in divorce. 

Pop star Britney Spears, a self-confessed 
Baptist wedded her childhood sweetheart in Las 
Vegas only to get it annulled 55 hours later. If that 
isn't a shameful blow to the institution of marriage, 
I don'l know what is. According to recent reports, 
the United States is the unrivaled world leader 
when it comes to divorce. So who is to say that 
same-sex marriages should not be recognized'' 
Why shouldn't they receive the same equality that 
heterosexual couples are given? Is it fair to give 
same-sex couples marital rights and responsibilities 
while reserving the word 'marriage' for couples of 
the opposite sex? 

'"Marriage' isapowerful word for both sides," 
said Alan Wolfe, director of Boston College's Boisi 
Center for Religion and American Public Life. 
"People want to reserve the 'm' word, but at the 
same time they don't want to discriminate." 

Come May, gay and lesbian marriages will 
be legalized in Massachusetts - a groundbreaking 
victory for the gay community. Although 38 states 
have approved laws that do not recognize gay 
marriages as legally binding, the U.S. Constitution 
requires that those states honor marriages legally 
performed in other states. Oregon, Vermont and 
Massachusetts are the only three states where 



courts have recognised the nghts of homosexuals 
lo be treated equally. 

However, while many same-sex couples are 
celebrating other Americans are worried that a 
sacred institution has been threatened. 

"If we have homosexual marriage main- 
stream, 1 can't even describe to you what our 
culture will be like," said Sandy Rios, president of 
Concerned Women for America, a leading anti-gay 
marriage organizations. 

While Rios is adamant about preserving the 
institution of marriage for a man and a woman, it 
is apparent that many people are still on Ihc fence 
with this issue. 

The court decision to issue same-sex licenses 
has intensified efforts to pass a US constitutional 
amendment banning gay marriage. One version 
of the amendment already has more than 100 
co-sponsors in Congress. Although Congress is in 
talks of amending the U.S. Constilution, it will no 
doubt be a timely process. Surely, this issue will be 
thrust into the spotlight even more so considering 
the upcoming presidential election, especially since 
Democratic frontrunner. Senator John Kerry, hails 
from Massachusetts. 

At campaign stops, Kerry was forced to say 
over and over that he opposed gay marriage and dis- 
agrees with his state's court ruling. He has also said 
he favored civil unions for gay couples and would 
vote against a U.S. constitutional amendment 

Should we uphold the term as it has always 
been defined, or has the world changed enough that 
it deserves a second look? Let the debate begin. 



jjjgj-E ffifllffC® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvetle Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter-Rowland 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787 Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



March 3, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Last game for seniors is a win 





Photograph by Kyle Pclcrson 
Senior Elienne Emanuel sees an open lane and drives 
to the hoop. 
By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 

• The California Lutheran University 
men's basketball team had a disappointing end 
to its season, suffering a defeat that cost it a trip 
to the playoffs. 

On Monday, Feb. 23, the Kingsmen were 
defeated by the Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens by a 



Photograph by Kyle Pclcrson 

Senior Logan Steinhauer looks for an opportunity to 
score in his last game as a Kingsmen. 

score of 53-72. Although the Kingsmen tied 
the Sagehens in the first half, they never led 
the game. 

"We couldn't get into a rhythm," junior 
Matt McCann said. 

Senior Zareh Avedian had 20 points and 
a team-high six rebounds. Sophomore Alex 
Minney had 1 8 points. The Kingsmen shot 39 
percent from the field, while the Sagehens shot 
60 percent for the game. 

"They were shooting well," Avedian 
said. 

"We played hard but fell short at the end," 
senior Logan Steinhauer said. 

On Thursday, Feb. 26, the Kingsmen 
won their final game of the season, defeating 



Photograph by Kyle Pclcrson 
Senior Billy Proctor concentrates on making his free- 
throws to contribute to the score. 

the Occidental Tigers 75-58. 

They opened their final game with a 
1 5-0 run in the first couple of minutes. To the 
Tigers* advantage, the Kingsmen's hot streak 
was temporarily cooled during a time-oul due 
to a net problem. CLU shot 62 percent in the 
opening half, leading the Tigers 42-20. 

Avedian went out with a game-high 26 
points, seven rebounds, five assists, three 
blocks and three steals. Ryan Hodges had 16 
points, and Ron Russ had 14 points. 

Seniors Avedian, Hodges, Etienne 
Emanuel, Billy Proctor and Steinhauer played 
in their final game as Kangsmen. 

"We just wanted to win our last game, 
and we did," Avedian said. 




Photograph bv Kyle Pclcrson 
Senior Zareh Avedian maneuvers the hall around his 
opponent to score two points for the Kingsmen. 

The Kingsmen ended 19-6 overall, and 
10-4 in the league. They share a second- 
place finish in league with Claremont-Mudd- 
Scripps. 



Regals' 9-5 record leaves 
them tied for second place 

y~ 4 ffT. ^ \ " We were capable of 
1 beating this team, but 
we just didn't play our 
best." 

Lauren Stroot 
Sophomore 



Regals misjudge Chapman 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 




Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
Sophomore Lauren Slrool s opponent tries to block 
her jump shot without any luck. 
By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
women's basketball team finished its sea- 
son 13-12 overall and 9-5 in league after 
losing to the Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens 
and defeating the Whittier Poets. 

On Monday, Feb. 22, the Regals lost 
a close game to the Sagehens by a score 
of 69-63. 

"We lost our focus throughout the 
whole game," senior Julie Cichon said. 

Sophomore Lauren Stroot scored 
a game-high 22 points and had 10 
rebounds, while junior Valerie Pina had 



12 points and four assists. 

"We were capable of beating this 
team, but we just didn't play our best," 
Stroot said. 

"We allowed the Sagehens to stay 
in the game," sophomore Alex Mallen 
said. 

On Wednesday, Feb. 24, the Regals 
won their final game, defeating Whittier 
77-70. Their win was a close call. With 
a little more than two minutes left in the 
game, the Poets were up 71-70. 

The Regals regained the lead for 
good after a three-point play by Stroot 
With only a few seconds remaining, 
Mallen drained a three-pointer to seal the 
victory for the Regals. 

Cichon played in her final game, 
scoring 10 points. She had a team-high 
of eight rebounds and blocked a shot 

Stroot scored a game-high 24 points, 
had seven rebounds and four steals. 
Mallen had 1 1 points, six rebounds and 
six assists. 

■"We let them come back in the 
second half and they kept it close, but 
we were able to win in the end," Cichon 
said. 



On Friday. Feb. 27, the No. 18 nation- 
ally-ranked California Lutheran University 
Regals tennis team faced the Chapman 
College Panthers at home to start another busy 
weekend for the team. The result, which came 
favorably to the Regals with a score of 9-0. 
was a kicker to get ready for the match against 
the No. 14 nationally-ranked Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps. 

All singles defeated their opponents, and 
in doubles, No. 1 Hunau/Hansen defeated 
Lewis/Nova 8-4, No. 2 Novajosky/Murphy 
defeated Summers/Hoffmann 8-1 and No. 3 
Perkins/Smalling defeated Nesbit/Galasso 8^1. 
The match against the Stags the next morning 
in Thousand Oaks, Calif, was a different story. 
The Regals lost to the Stags, 6-3. 

"I was really excited because I thought 
we could win after the doubles, bul the result 
went the other way at the end." sophomore 
Blair Murphy said. 

"We didn't realize how good they were 
going to be. We started pretty slow in the 
singles, and once the match got underway, it 
was too late to climb back up," senior Rebecca 
Hunau said. 

Hunau is ranked No. 47 in the country. 
The only win for Regals singles was No. 
5 Bnana Smalling, who defeated Michelle 



Rothzeid 6-1,7-5. 

No. 1 Jen Hansen lost to Lauren Drew 7- 
5, 6-2, No. 2 Hunau lost lo Jessica Nagasako 
7-5, 6-0, and No. 3 Lisa Novajosky lost to 
Jeannine Liang, 7-5, 6-2. The doubles started 
favorably to the Regals when Ihe No. 2 and 
No. 3' doubles teams of Murphy /Novajosky 
and Perkins/Smalling defeated their opponenls 
with scores of 8^1 and 8-6 respectively. No. 1 
doubles Hansen/Hunau lost to Drew/Liang 
8-4. 

Head Coach Nancy Garrison was proud 
of the Regals' performance this weekend. 

"On Friday's match, we deal! really well 
with the intense wind, against Chapman, and 
then on Saturday's match against Claremonl, 
we played against the best team we have 
played this season. The girls performed very 
competitively, and it was a close situation. We 
want to get them back next time," Garrison 
said. 

"We didn't realize how 
good they were going to 
be ... once the match got 
underway, it was too late 
to climb back up." 

Rebecca Hunau 
Senior 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

To work less than 10 minutes from CLU! 

Spend the most rewarding summer of your life 

outdoors working with children! 

You can earn $2800-$3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamp.com 



® jqs 7E.<&m<£ 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 3, 2004 



Baseball comes off weekend 2-1 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen baseball team started 
out shaky on Friday, Feb. 27, but came 
out hot on Saturday, Feb. 28, as it played 
Pomona-Pitzer. 

The Kingsmen dropped the first 
game of three to the Sagehens, losing 5- 
4. The Sagehens tallied two runs in the 
eighth inning to make the score 5-3. The 
Kingsmen tried to battle back with a single 
in the ninth, but it was just not enough. 

Sophomore pitcher Matt Hirsh gave 
up five runs in 7. 1 innings and struck out 
12 batters. Junior Nick Bjork had two hits 
and a home run. Junior Danny Chaparo 
had a pair of hits, as well. 

"We are better than how we played 
on Friday, but Matt Hirsh pitched a good 
game, and it was just too bad we couldn't 
get that win," junior Roy Riley said. 

The Kingsmen fired it up on Saturday 
as they battled the Sagehens again. In 
game one of the double header, the 
Kingsmen beat the Sagehens 17-3. All of 
the runs they needed to gain a solid lead 
were plated within the first inning. 

Junior Jon Calmes returned to the 
mound after being out with an injury. 
Calmes threw the whole game, striking 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Junior Danny Chaparro dives back to first base as the pitcher tries to pick him off. 



out eight with no walks. 

"It was good to be back on the mound 
in a starting position. The offense fired 
'z-missiles' and drove in the win. I am 
really proud of the team," Calmes said. 

Chaparo, junior Simon Lozano, junior 
David Ramirez and senior Ryan Hosteller 
all collected three hits apiece. Chaparo 
also had three RBIs. Hostetler, sophomore 
Christian Hariot and senior Ed Edsall all 
had home runs. 

In the second game of the double 
header, the Kingsmen beat the Sagehens, 
9-3. 



They, once again, scored all the runs 
that they would need to secure their lead in 
the opening inning; seven players crossed 
the plate. 

Junior Dominick Marci pitched a 
perfect four innings. Hostetler pulled off a 
three-run home run. 

"I think that if we come out with 
enthusiasm and focus from the start, we 
make the teams give up, and then we take 
control over the game, like we did against 
Pomona-Pitzer," Bjork said. "If we keep 
playing like this, it would be hard for any 
team to beat us." 



Photograph by Dan Notion 

Junior Jeff Cummings lakes a swing ai the hall 
and sends a line drive into the field 



Golf getting into the swing Tennis learns from defeat 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Si M Writer 



The Kingsmen golf team won one 
tournament and lost another to move to 
1-2 in the SCIAC and 2-2 overall. 

The team lost to the University of 
La Verne Leopards on Thursday, Feb. 
26. 306-303. Freshman Tyler Doyle 
completed the par-71 course with a 72, 
followed by sophomore Peder Nyhus, 
who finished 6-up. Senior Jordan 
Silvertrust finished with a 78, fieshman Nick 
Verner finished with a 79 and junior 
Jason Poyser and freshman Christian 
Colunga both finished with an 82. 

"1 think we were all ready to play," 
Head Coach Jeff Lindgren said. "We 
were excited to get some sunshine to 
play in; the golf course was extremely 
wet from all the rain. We played lift- 
clean-and-place, allowing the players 
to lift the ball, clean it, place it back 
down and hit it. We kind of let our guard 
down in the end and we didn't finish as 
strong as we needed to. I think it cost us 
the match. The positive thing is that we 
played well in the beginning; one of our 
freshmen, Tyler Doyle, shot a 72." 

"We had a good day, just disappoint- 
ing. It was a good match," Poyser said. 



The Kingsmen defeated the 
Chapman University Panthers in a non- 
conference tournament, 302-332, on 
Monday, Feb. 23. Poyser and Doyle both 
finished the par-71 course in Camarillo 
5-up. Colunga and Nyhus both finished 
7-up. Silvertrust and Verner both fin- 
ished 8-up. 

"We've been playing pretty well in 
practice," Lindgren said. "We're getting 
close to where we need to be. I think the 
guys are getting more confident each 
day they play. That was the first time 
in a while that we had six guys score in 
the 70s." 

"We finally put everything together 
as a team," Doyle said. "Our whole team 
was under 80." 

Lindgren, Doyle and Poyser said 
that the weather was more suitable for a 
golf tournament. 

"When we played Whittier, that 
day was super windy," Lindgren said. 
"When we played Claremont, we played 
in pouring rain the whole day." 

"We finally had a good day of 
weather; we didn't have to play in 30 
mph wind and torrential rain," Poyser 
said. 

At press time, the results for the 
match against Chapman University were 
not available. 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



On Saturday, Feb. 28, the California 
Lutheran University Kingsmen ended 
another big test in SCIAC play and national 
play. The Kingsmen this weekend faced the 
No. 10 nationally-ranked (currently No. 1 
in SCIAC) Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Stags. 
This weekend they also faced the University 
of La Verne Leopards and the No. 9 national- 
ly-ranked Mary Washington College Eagles. 

One of the main matches that the 
Kingsmen played this weekend was the 
match against the Stags. The score favoring 
the Stags, 1-6, was a loss that marked a new 
goal for the Kingsmen. 

"We are going have to come out huge at 
the conference tournament, and to do so, we 
are going to be working harder than we are 
at the moment," sophomore Joel Wetterholm 
said. 

The only player this weekend to come 
undefeated in singles from the Kingsmen 
squad was No. 38 nationally-ranked junior 
and co-captain Quinn Caldaron. Caldaron 
won two of his matches in three sets, defeat- 
ing the No. 1 player (No. 32 nationally) for 
the Eagles. 

"The weekend didn't turn out to be what 
we liked, but I think that we are going to start 
heading in the right direction. It made us 
realize what work we need to do," Caldaron 
said. 

The only win for the Kingsmen against 



the Stags was by No. 1 singles Caldaron, who 
defeated John Chamakoon 0-6, 6-4, 7-6. No. 

2 singles J.V. Vallejos lost to William Ellison 
3-6, 6-4, 6-1 and No. 3 singles Shara Surabi 
lost to David Oehm 4-6. 6-4, 6-1. 

All Kingsmen doubles were defeated as 
well. No. 1 doubles Arapovic/Vallejos lost 
to Chamakoon/EUison 8-2. No. 2 doubles 
Caldaron/Staley lost to Evan Feldhausen/W 
Ellison 8-5, and No. 3 Wetterholm/Junya 
Hasebe lost to Aaron Fuhriman/Oehm 8-6. 

All singles won their matches against 
the Leopards. 

The doubles teams were two for 
three. No. 1 doubles Vallejos/Arapovic lost 
to Rodriguez/Cortez 9-8 (8) while No. 2 
Caldaron/Staley defeated Horowitz/Samuel 
9-7, and No. 3 Felix/Wetterholm defeated 
Alvarez/Nguyen 8-3. 

Once again, the only win for Kingsmen 
singles was No. 1 Caldaron, who defeated 
Tim Ryan 2-6, 6-2, 6-2. No. 2 Vallejos lost to 
Paul Bristow 6-2. 7-6 (0), and No. 3 Surabi 
lost to Jon Clair 6-3, 6-0. 

In doubles, No. 1 Caldaron/Hasebe lost 
to Bristow/Uyar 9-7, No. 2 Vallejos/Arapovic 
lost to Nate Hathaway/Ryan 9-8 (8), and No. 

3 Staley/Wetterholm lost to Clan/Rogers 
8-5. 

Head Coach Mike Genette, in spile of 
the losses this weekend, was proud of the 
team. 

"I think we learned more in defeat that 
in winning," Genette said. 



Softball loses three in a row to Leopards 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The Regals Softball team fell to 
1-9 overall and 0-3 in SCIAC after three 
consecutive losses to the University of La 
Veme Leopards. 

Senior outfielder Carrie Mitchell had 
one run, went 3-for-4 and threw a runner 
out from center field, as the Regals lost 4-7 
on Friday, Feb. 27, at home. Junior catcher 
Marlene Merchain had one single and one 



triple. 

The Regals lost the first game of 
Saturday's double-header at La Veme 2-9 
and the second game 1-3. Mitchell record- 
ed two singles, one RBI, one run and one 
stolen base in the first game. Sophomore 
pitcher Gianna Regal allowed three runs in 
the second game. The team scored one run 
in the sixth inning. 

"We're obviously frustrated where we 
stand right now," Head Coach Debbie Day 
said. "But we haven't lost hope that we can 



still win the conference. Last year, we had 
four losses and we won the conference, so 
it's a possibility. We've just got to start put- 
ting some things together." 

"We're trying extremely hard," sopho- 
more Olivia Chacon said. "We just need 
a little momentum and to start a winning 
streak. The positive thing is we can only go 
up from here. We need to keep with it and 
not give up. We need to continue to work 
at winning." 

Sophomore outfielder Monica Schallert 



finds a good side to the games and mentions 
that the team needs to move on. 

"I think the team right now is trying to 
find itself," Schallert said. "The good thing 
from it is we've got to find an edge to keep 
us fired up the whole game. We're working 
on coming together as a team. I just think 
that this is a bump, and we need to keep 
looking forward to what happens next." 

The Regals travel on March 5 to play 
their next game against Claremont-Mudd- 
Scripps. 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 18 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Kingsmen baseball extends win 
streak to six games. 



See story page 10 



March 10, 2004 



Features 

How to remain safe when getting tattoos 
and piercings. 



See story page 6 



News 

CLU students travel to 

Washington to debate Cal 

Grant cuts. 

See story page 3 



California holds primary elections 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



California's primary election proved to 
be a "Super Tuesday" in the nation's politi- 
cal process as Senator John Kerry won the 
Democratic party presidential nomination and 
three of the four proposed ballot measures 
passed. California Lutheran University stu- 
dents and Thousand Oaks, Calif, area residents 
came out to participate in the process and to 
ensure that their votes counted. The election 
was on March 2. 

"To vote is to be an American," said 
Thousand Oaks resident Kerri Daniels. "It 
is a gift that we are given, and most people 
don't appreciate" it or understand the power 
they have." 

In this case, the power was in helping 
choose which of the Democratic candidates 
would run in the November election against 
President Bush. It was an important day in the 
primary stage because 10 states participated. 
Senator Kerry won nine of the 10, causing 
Senator John Edwards to drop out of the race. 



"In fact, we expect that we will easily 
do 65 or 70 percent by close at 8 p.m.," said 
precinct clerk Ed Viggers. "This precinct has 
had great turnout in the past, and this election 
should be no different" 

"It is important that everyone votes," 
said Thousand Oaks resident Michael Conde. 
"[Voting] shows the spectrum of the experi- 
ence, from young to old and their different 

"To vote is to be an 
American. It is a gift that 
we are given, and most 
people don't appreciate it 
or understand the power 
they have." 

Kerri Daniels 
Thousand Oaks resident 

concerns. The spectrum is what makes democ- 
racy work." 

"Other countries have 100 percent turn- 
out, and the voters often have to wait in line 
for days just to vote," Malang said "People 




After presenting identification, freshman Emily Melander signs in to 
receive her ballot. 



Kerry won California with 64.5 percent of the 
vote. 

"It is important to vote every time. If I 
want to enjoy the benefits of being a citizen, I 
must do my civic duty. It is my duty; it is my 
privilege," said Meagan Neville, a senior his- 
tory major at CLU. 

Poll Inspector Walter Malang of CLU 
Precinct 8144 was optimistic about the voter 
turnout, which reached 30 percent by 2 p.m. 

"We always beat what the state says we'll 
do [in voter numbers]," Malang said. "In the 
recall, they said we'd do 40 or 50 percent 
and we actually had 80 percent of voters rum 
out" 



who don't participate get what they ask for: 
nothing. It's their own fault." 

Voter turnout is of particular importance 
at this stage in the political and governmen- 
tal process. As the 2004 presidential elec- 
tion looms near and current ballot measures 
struggle to be recognized, voter participation 
is paramount. 

Although the Democratic nomination was 
the major topic of conversation this primary, 
CLU students appeared to be paying particular 
attention to the propositions on the election 
ballot. The measures being considered includ- 
ed Proposition 55, Kindergarten-University 
Public Education Facilities Bond Act; 




Having completed making her selections, Thousand Oaks resident 
Penny Alharran turns in her ballot. 



Proposition 56, State Budget, Related Taxes, 
and Reserve; Proposition 57, The Economic 
Recovery Bond Act and Proposition 58, The 
California Balanced Budget Act. 

"The propositions are really important 
this time. I am paying particular attention to 
55 and 56 because I want to teach and these 
issues will dictate my future. It is important to 
keep your future in mind when voting," said 
Holly Hoppman, a senior political science 




CLU precinct 8144 representative Robert Lawler 
checks voters off of the master list 

Photographs by Stephanie Shaker 



major. 

Proposition 56 was the only one of the 
measures that failed to pass. It would have 
allowed legislators to raise taxes with less of an 
approval margin. Proposition 55 appeared as 
though it would not pass early in the evening, 
but in the end, it did. • 

Propositions 57 and 58, the governor's 
balanced budget and economic recovery 
acts, which received widespread bipartisan 
support, both passed 
by an overwhelming 
majority. 

"It is impor- 
tant to vote on the 
legislative issues 
because often there 
are hidden agendas," 
said senior A Hie 
Latrangna, a political 
science major, "like 
the proposition that 
claims to be about 
'responsible legisla- 
tors' but is really 
about raising taxes. 
It is important for 
voters to know what 
the issues are really 
about," she said. 

"Unfortunately, 
people don't think 
that their votes 
make a difference," 
said precinct clerk 
Eleanor Moore, "but 
they do." 



Sljqs ?EaiH© 



The Echo 



Calendar 



MARCH 10, 2004 




a sneak peek of this week at the In 



today 

march 10 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

French Club Meeting 

F-5 
6 p.m. 

Rotaract Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 




#^ 



thursday 

march 11 



College Democrats Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
7 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 
Gym 

9 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 



friday 

march 12 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Club LU: Bowling 

Simi Valley Bowl 
9 p.m. 




Saturday 

march 13 

c 

RHA Siblings Weekend 

Wacky Wild Hall Olympics 

Kingsmen Park 
2 p.m. 

Faith and Life Conference 

P/B Forum 
9 a.m. 

CSC RAIN Project 

SUB 

Meet at 1 1 a.m. 



Sunday 

march 14 



Intramural Softball 
Gibello Field 
10 a.m. 







o 



Lord of U/e Worship Service 

Chapel 

6: 15 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
9 p.m. 

monday 

march 15 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting (+ 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 



ft 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 



Summer Day Camps seek General Counselors & Specialist In- 
structors. Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff can earn $2800 
$3500+ for the summer working with children outdoors 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit www.workatcamp.com 



classifieds DEADLINE!!! 



TODAY! ! ! 



CAREER EXPO 2004 



Roomkecper Needed: Sludenls of Mogen 
1315 are seeking room-cleaning services. 
Duties include: vacuuming, dusting, dishes, 
bathroom clean-up and making of beds. Pay is 
ncgotiable. 

If interested, contact Mandy: 
(805) 241-2222 

Room for Rent: In Moorpark M/F. non-smok- 
er, students only, meal plan and DSL available 
(extra). $60U/monlh 

If interested, page: 
(805) 378-6092 

House for Rent: In Thousand Oaks. 3+2, gar- 
deners included, $2198 a month. Short term 
okay. 

If interested, call: 
(805) 778-0867 or (805) 907-9701 

For renk Studio apt. in TO. Full bathroom. 

new fridge, new microwave, non-smoker and 

no pets allowed. SI.(KM)/month. 

If interested, call: 

(805) 857-0503 

Tutors Needed: $!5-S18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one. in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training Flexible hours Reliable transpor- 
tation required Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume Include standardized lest scores 
(SAT i/1!, ORE. etc ) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or Tux resume to: (310)282-6424 

or email resume to: 

instructor hirine/i^ 1 aceeducalion.com 

Homework Help: For high school student in 
Oxnard area Once a week. S20/hr. 

If interested, contact Cruz at: 
(805)493-3219 

For Sale: A Sears 52" Screen TV. In excellent 
condition. Asking $500. 

If interested, contact Carolline at: 
(805) 987-3453 

For Sale: Parakeets. Asking $8 each. 

If interested, contact Carolline at: 

(805) 987-3453 



CLU SEMESTER at 
RIMBACH, GERMANY 

Applications are now being received 
tor a semester of stud) abroad at the 
Martin Luther Seluile in Rimbaeh, 
Germany. This CI. I 'program allows 
you t( > enn ill at CI A 1 , keep y< iur ti nair 
cial aid, and spend a full semester as 
a student and teaching assistant at 
this distinguished German academy. 
Application forms arc available 
from Drs. Walter Stewart and 
Paula Kgnatchik in the German 
department or from Randy Toland, 
I lumanities Secretary. The dead- 
line to apply for fall semester. 
1004 is Friday, March 12, 2004. 

Tor more information, please see Dr. 

Egnatcriik, Dr. Walter Stewart, or Dr. 

Herbert Goocn, 

Director or Stuck) Abroad. 



t On Wed. March 10th 
from 1 Oam to 2pm 



sXj^^ In Quad area near I 
flagpole along the 
planters. 



^C«\^ In case of rain, the Expo will be moved to the 
C~^f >-tJ> Humanities lobbies. Science lobby, and outside 
Tcler a tent between the two areas. 



GjfeSfc"^ Hi 



All students must register 
in order to receive their required name badge. 

To register, jiut ema'd your name, phone munber, email addrcut, major S grad date to: 

Cynthia Smith, Career Counselor/Recruitment Coordinator at 

csmith@clunet.edu 

The CLU Career Expo 2004 is sponsored by Career Services. 
If any questions, they can be contacted at (805) 493-3196. 



Omicron Delta Kappa 

would like to congratulate the 

recipients of 

February [i Leadership 

Excellence Award: 

KEVIN JUSSEL 
JON CUMMINGS 

and 
LINDSAY MILLER 



BOO, you've just been WAIED 

If you want to find out what that is and other intriguing aspects of 
Thailand come on over for Thai Night 

TODAY in Nygreen 1 between 6-8 pm 
for Thailand snacks and a night of fun! 



Asian Club and Friends 



Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and FRIENDSl 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori, president 

(818) 590-7625 



Where are YOU going? 

Come find oof more of fhe 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 or x3750 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon - Triur., 12 to 1 p.m. 



Classified ads < 
on the Calendar 



P a S c 



fo 



flat 



rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
and cfa 



editing for content ar 
Call: 
(805) +95-5565 



anty. 



FREE SUPPORT GROUP for Eating Disorder Recoverers 



Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the F-Building 

Sponsored by the CLU Counseling Center and Marriage, Family 
Child Center, in conjunction with the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). 

For more information, please feel free to call or email me or log onto: 
http 7/www a ltriie net/site/anadweb/ 

ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 
Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW Ext: 3390 ccollettrgclunet.edu 



BSU: BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 



Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, & FELLOWSHIP!! 

Everyone is WELCOME ! 

For more information, call: 

Juanila Pryor Hall 

(805) 493-1951 

BSU Adviser 



March 10, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Creative Options focuses on women 



By Vallene Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Women from all over the community 
came to take part in the 25lh annual Creative 
Options workshop held Saturday, March 6, on 
the California Lutheran University campus. 

Creative Options is a day for women that 
is organized in part by the Women's Resource 
Center, as well as the American Association of 
University Women. 

According to the Director of the Women's 
Resource Center, Dr. Kateri Alexander, this 
year will be the last that the WRC will hold 
the annual event. 

Lack of university funding has been cited 
as a possible cause. 

The morning began with keynote speaker 
and best-selling author Cathleen Rountree. 



In her speech, she discussed "Glimpses of 
Creative Women's Lives from 30 to 70." 

The women in attendance went around to 
different information tables and then went to 
their first workshop for session A. 

In session A, there were 24 different 
workshops that women could attend. Each 
workshop was approximately 75 minutes and 
ranged in topic from "Yoga Fitness," presented 
by yoga instructor Mary Starkweather, to "Key 
Ingredients for Starting Your Own Business," 
presented by CEO and founder of California 
Entrepreneur for Women, Inc., Marilyn York 

Next on the schedule was an hour lunch, 
followed by session B of the workshops. 

In this session, women could attend 
24 different workshops on topics such as 
"Retirement Insurance Planning," presented 
by Susan Erkfhtz and "Achieve Balance with 



Feng Shui and Future Trends," presented 
by owner of Feng Shui Four Balance Pat 
Sendejas. 

Session C had workshops that focused 

"Life is too short to take 
seriously." 



Sheryl Roush 
Motivational Speaker 

on "Meditation and Mindfulness-A Pathway 
to Joy" with Patricia Van Buskirk and 
"Estate Planning Facts Every Mom Should 



Know," presented by attorney Diedre Dennis 
Wachbnt. 

After all the sessions had been completed, 
the women met back in the gym to hear the 
closing speech by motivational speaker Sheryl 
Roush. 

"Life is too short to take it so seriously," 
Roush said. 

Roush's speech. titled, 
"Sparkletude: Attitude is Everything," focused 
on four points that included keeping a smile on 
your face when the day gets you down, ways 
to stay sane and lighthearted in stressful times, 
dealing with difficult people and challenging 
situations and reducing stress and increasing 
teamwork and beating burnout. 

"We're in complete control of our choic- 
es." Roush said 



Benefits of Fair Trade Coffee dis- 
cussed b y students and faculty 



By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



A small, but influential group of stu- 
dents and faculty members met last week 
to discuss the benefits of Fair Trade Coffee 
and the feasibility of serving such coffee 
on campus. 

This grassroots movement of stu- 
dents and faculty, headed by junior John 
Cummings, was inspired in part by the 
Lutheran Student Movement and the 
Lutheran World Relief organization. 

Cummings gave a short power-point 
lecture, outlining the differences between 
regular trade coffee and Fair Trade Coffee 
to gather campus support for the move- 
ment. He argued that, by switching to 
Fair Trade Coffee, California Lutheran 
University could better fulfill the goals 



stated in the school's mission statement, 
namely, to "educate leaders for a global 
society." 

Similar nation-wide movements to 
buy Fair Trade Coffee are aimed at pro- 
viding fair and stable coffee prices for 

"If we can get a competi- 
tive price and accomplish 
some social good, then 
[the switch to Fair Trade 
Coffee] is possible." 

Luther Luedtke 
CLU President 

third-world farmers. In recent decades, 
Latin American farmers have seen drastic 
reduction in coffee prices that make it 



nearly impossible for them to support their 
families. Many such farmers are forced 
each year to take out high-interests loans. 
As a result of low coffee prices and market 
surpluses, many farmers are unable to pay 
off their loans and have their land seized 
by creditors. Thus, they go from landown- 
ers to day laborers and make significantly 
less money. With fair trade coffee, farmers 
band together in co-ops, sharing respon- 
sibility and risk, and are provided with 
reasonable interest rates on loans. 

Religion Professor Pamela Brubaker 
spoke after Cummings, drawing on her 
personal experiences in Latin America. 

"When you buy a cup of coffee, about 
1 percent of the price goes to the farmers," 
Brubaker said. 

Brubaker emphasized the important 
difference that CLU students and faculty 



members could make by switching to fair 
trade coffee. She talked about farmers that 
she had met and how Fair Trade Coffee 
had changed their lives. 

"These people have a sense of 
decency and pride," Brubaker said of the 
farmers working with the Lutheran World 
Relief organization. 

CLU President Luther Luedtke 
attended the meeting and pledged his sup- 
port for the movement. 

"If we can get both a competitive 
price and accomplish some social good, 
then [the switch to fair trade coffee] is 
possible," Luedtke said. 

Luedtke warned that the switch may 
not be easy and would require more effort, 
by both students and staff. 

"The challenge is more of bureau- 
cracy than cost," Luedtke said. 



New budget cuts Cal Grant maximum 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



Four California Lutheran University 
students and students and administra- 
tors from some two dozen independent 
colleges traveled to Sacramento on Feb. 
25 to urge legislators to reject Governor 
Schwarzenegger's proposal to slash pri- 
vate institutions' Cal Grant awards by 44 
percent, a cut that would reduce the tuition 

"Basically, it comes 
down to this: many of us 
could not afford to go to 
school without the help 
of the Cal Grant." 

Dereem McKinney 
senior 

aid by more than $4,200. 

According to a CLU news release, the 
four students who attended the meeting at 
the state capitol were Matthew Broussard, 
a sophomore studying mathematics; 
Colter Fleming, a sophomore majoring in 
business; Juana Torres, a political science 
and environmental studies double major, 



and Dereem McKinney, a senior majoring 
in liberal studies with a concentration in 
science. 

"I was very happy that CLU par- 
ticipated in the meeting, and it was great 
that so many schools got so involved," 
McKinney said. 

The governor's plan would reduce 
the Cal Grant maximum award, which 
is based on achievement and financial 
need, from $9,708 to $5,482 for private 
institutions, as compared to the reduction 
in public university's funding by a much 
smaller 8 percent. 

"It's a common misconception that 
private school students are rich and can 
afford the tuition, so the cuts don't really 
matter. In fact, quite the opposite is true," 
McKinney said. "Statistics show that 
the families of students who receive Cal 
Grants at public universities earn, on aver- 
age, about $10,000 more a year than the 
families of private school students. The 
proposed cuts are, then, significantly more 
unfair to those of us who attend private 
schools." 

"The reduction in the Cal Grant is 
a short-sighted recommendation on the 
governor's part," said Darryl Calkins, 
dean of admissions. "The Cal Grant is 
really the one thing that makes it possible 



for private school and independent institu- 
tion students to attend." 

CLU Director of Communications 
Lynda Fulford said the cuts will effec- 
tively "reduce the choices that California 
residents have to attend private universi- 
ties." 

"This is a major issue, particularly for 
public universities that are already hav- 
ing trouble making room for students," 
Fulford said. "It is very difficult to get into 
state and UC schools as it is. This will just 
further reduce the choices and potential for 
California students." 

Although the proposal will not affect 
current CLU students, it will affect 2004 
incoming freshmen, many of whom may 
have based their decision to attend a pri- 
vate university on their ability to pay for 
the considerably higher tuition via the Cal 
Grant. 

"Basically, their funds are cut in half. 
This is a major impact on incoming stu- 
dents and will cause many to rethink their 
school options," Fulford said. 

"The Cal Grant gives [students] a 
choice; without it we cannot afford the 
tuition and are forced to only consider 
attending public universities. This will 
compound the overcrowding problem 



already occurring there," McKinney said. 

"There is already a high level of undue 
pressure upon public institutions," Calkins 
said. "The cuts will create even more 
overcrowding and force more students 
into a system that is already overstressed 
and struggling. As it stands now, it takes 
about five years for a UC student to gradu- 
ate and about six for a state school student. 
There are simply not enough classes or too 
few seats available to the students." 

"This situation affects everyone, 
not just the students. Private institutions 
do more specialization in majors, which 
means students are often more qualified 
when they graduate," McKinney said. 
"This enhances the job market and the 
community as well." 

"Basically, it comes down to this: 
many of us could not afford to go to school 
without the help of the Cal Grant. I am one 
of those students," McKinney said. "Any 
time you cut education, it is never a good 
thing. I just can't understand how the gov- 
ernor doesn't recognize the harm that this 
will do in the long run " 

Students who are interested to learn 
more about the cuts in the Cal Grant 
should contact Calkins in the office of 
admissions at x3 1 35 or Fulford at x3839. 



m?m ^«iH® 



The Echo 



NEWS 



March 10, 2004 



Frank Maguire speaks at MLF 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University held 
its 34th annual Mathew's Leadership 
Forum. This year's theme was "Discover 
the Courage to Succeed." Francis "Frank" 
X. Maguire was the keynote speaker for 
the event, which was held on March 4. 

Maguire is currently the president of 
Maguire Communications. He has been 
involved as a senior executive with com- 
panies such as Kentucky Fried Chicken, 
ABC and American Airlines and was a 
founder of Federal Express. 

He is also an accomplished author, 
having written a book for motivating 
employees, called "You're the Greatest!" 

MLF, put on by the university in 
conjunction with the CLU Community 
Leaders Association and Rotaract, is a 
chance for successful business people 
in and around Thousand Oaks, Calif, to 
come and talk to CLU students. 

Approximately 250 students, faculty 
and community members attended. To 
entice more CLU students to sign up for 
the event, the planning committee offered 
all students who attended a free pizza cou- 
pon and a free movie ticket. 

"To be honest with you, I went due to 
the free movie and a pizza, but then I was 
placed at the head table and got to sit next 
to Frank Maguire and Jim Parson, the host 
... to sum it up, I had an amazing experi- 
ence," junior Jared Perry said. 

A facilitator from the business com- 



munity, a CLU student and a faculty mem- 
ber hosted each table. The other five seats 
were randomly assigned to CLU students 
and business leaders in order to create a 
good dynamic for discussion. 

To kick off the evening, Jim Parson, 
chairperson of the MLF planning com- 
mittee welcomed all in attendance. A 
welcome address from CLU President 
Luther Luedtke followed. The round table 
discussion then commenced. 

The facilitator at each table had a set 
of five questions about courage to ask his 
or her table. These prompter questions 
helped to create a good environment for 
talking about business leadership and how 
courage plays a part. Table discussions 
lasted 45 minutes, and most continued 
into the dinner portion of the evening. 
After dinner, there was time for sponsor 
recognition, where all sponsors of the 
event were acknowledged for their_part in 
making MLF a success. 

Just over two hours into the evening, 
Maguire addressed the crowd. 

Maguire turned the fox's wise state- 
ment in "The Little Prince" into a theme 
for his talk: "It is only with the heart that 
one can see clearly. What is essential 
about you is invisible to the eye." 

He told many stories about his life 
that related to knowing yourself. 

One such story told of Maguire and 
Col. Sanders walking through Red Square 
in Russia, toward the Kremlin, and groups 
of Russians kept passing by, muttering 
to themselves. Col. Sanders, annoyed at 
not being recognized in Russia as he is 




ISSY's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



Save Time When Working in 
Excel 

Entering large amounts of data 
into an Excel spreadsheet can be 
very time-consuming. The task is 
made easier with a data entry form. 
A. data entry form is a dialog box 
that gives you a convenient way to 
enter a complete row of informa- 
tion at one time. 

To use a data entry form, be 
sure the first row of the spreadsheet 
contains a label name for each col- 
umn. Proceed as follows: 

1. Click any cell that contains 
the label name of a column. 



2. On the Data menu, click 
Form. 

3. A window may appear ask- 
ing you to confirm that the first row 
contains column labels; click OK. 

A data entry dialog box appears 
with field labels that correspond 
with the column labels in the 
spreadsheet The next step is to add 
a new record as follows: 

1. Click New. 

2. Type the data for the new 
record in each field. 

3. When you finish typing data 
for a record, press the Enter key to 
add the record to the spreadsheet. 

4. When you finish adding 
records, click Close on the form 
dialog box to exit the data form. 

Please note that records can 
also be erased using the Delete but- 
ton on-the data entry form. 

If you have any questions 
regarding using the data entry 
form in Excel, please contact 
the Help Desk at x3698 01 
help@clunet.edu. 



elsewhere in the world, testily demanded 
to know what they were saying. Finally, 
Maguire turned to him and said, "Colonel, 
don't worry about it. I know what they're 
saying ... They're saying, 'Who's that with 
Frank McGuire?'" Maguire continued, 
"The moral of this story is that each and 
every one of us craves recognition. Every 
one of us needs it, we feed off of it, and we 
spend such little time getting to know and 
recognize who we are, ourselves." 

"Young men and women of this uni- 
versity, you are starting on your journey. 

When you are 70, you'll be starting on 
your journey. Life is a journey," Maguire 
said. "What is essential about you has 
nothing to do with the car you drive, the 
house you live in, the portfolio you used 
to manage. What is essential about you is 
the life behind your eyes." 

"1 was very captivated by his address 
and was inspired to change how I do some 
things in my life," Perry said. 

"Besides a few table assignment 
problems early on, the evening was a huge 
success. I think everyone really enjoyed 
Frank's motivational stories," planning 
committee member Jason Soyster said. 

The event ended with a question 
and answer session where Maguire told 
the story of how he had the opportunity 
to tutor Marilyn Monroe in philosophy 
right after graduating from college. He 
followed the question and answer session 
with a book signing where members of 
the audience were able to get their books 
signed. 



CLU faculty 
members 
promoted 



Elected to Tenure: 

Henry Alegria 
Beverly Bryde 
Randall Donohue 

Elected to Tenure 

and advanced to 

Associate Professor 

R. Guy Erwin 
Druann Pagliassotti 

Advanced to Full 
Professor: 

Kristine Butcher 
Gregory Freeland 
Paul Gathercoal 
Steven Kissinger 
Gail Uellendahl 




You Can Make 
a Difference 

Earn your degree at 
Cal Lutheran 



Corrections 

The story "CLU changing GPA req.'s for honors" from issue No. 16 
on Feb. 25 was originally credited to Valerie Vallejos. The actual writer of 
the story was Tammy Austin. In addition, the feature, from issue No. 1 7 on 
March 3, titled "Blessings given at Ash Wednesday concert" was credited 
to Yuridia Perez. The feature was actually written by Kristina Sterling. 



Cal Lutheran's evening educational 
programs include: 

■ B.A. Liberal Studies for paraeducators 

■ M. Id. teacher Preparation 

■ M.S.Special Education 

■ M. A. Curriculum (V Instruction 

■ M.A. Educational Administration 

■ M.s. 1 ounseling and Guidance 

■ Pupil Personnel Services 

■ College Student Personnel 

■ Id. P. Educational I eadership 

1 

You are invited 




Grad 



HJIK»IIZI 



Cal Lutheran's evening 
programs information 
meetings 



Ctill fbi more information 
\umted and reservation 



Toll-free: l-888-CLU-GRAD (258-4723) 

California Lutheran University 

Woodland Hills • Thousand Oaks • Ventura • Los Angele; 
clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/Graduate 



®Jffi ^(SJIffi 



March 10, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



What is your biggest pet peeve? 





Toby Spitlberger, human development, 2007 Natalie Sylvester, psychology, 2007 

"Dirty bathrooms." "When people smack when they eat.' 





Ed Hudson, business, 2005 
"Rain. I hate the rain." 



Katrina Wong, multimedia communication. 
2006 

"People who lie." 



WZ*- **"* 


[ 


<r? 


) 


1 


\ 





Barlow Gilmore, mulitmedia, 2006 



Marisa Santelli, history, 2007 



David Garza, criminal justice, 2005 



Julie Norman, Spanish and sociology, 2004 



"When your roommates eat your food." "When guys wear sandals with long "When people go slow on one-lane "When people snap their gum in class." 

pants." roads." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Claire Hillard. 



Car of the Week 




The United Blood Services will be here 

with the Bloodmobile on March 22-24. 

Anyone interested in donating blood can 

sign up in the SUB front desk starting 

Wednesday, March 10. Questions? 
Call the Community Service Center at 
x3981 . 



Rim 

Hot Nights? Cool Trips? 



Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson. 
Senior Jeremy Soiland stands through the sunroof of his 2000 Ford F250. His 
truck is powered by a chipped 7.3 turbo diesel. Underneath his 12 inch lift he's 
running 39.5 inch tall, 16.5 inches wide tires on 18 inch rims. 



Think your car could 

be named 
"Car of the Week"? 



Call Kyle at x2791 




31-Hg lllflJH® 



v> The Echo 



FEATURES 



March 10, 2004 



Study Abroad: A school without classroom walls 



By Tina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



"Enlightening" and "something every- 
body should do" is how California Lutheran 
University senior Josh Kramer described his 
semester abroad in France. It is a sentiment 
shared by many who take advantage of a 
study abroad program. CLU's Study Abroad 
programs offer students semester to year 
programs to 28 other countries. The choices 
range from South Africa to Italy and Costa 
Rica to England. There is literally something 
for everyone. 

However, most CLU students don't take 
advantage of it. Political science professor 
Herbert Gooch is the director of the CLU 
office of Study Abroad and helps students 
through the process, which is easier than most 
think. 

When is the best time, what about the 
money and what about classes, are all ques- 
tions that Gooch hears from students. 

"Generally, junior year is the best time," 
Gooch said. "When you figure you can go 
primarily after you finished the core [2 1 ] and 
you're a little bit older and more mature." 

There are different ways to economize 



the trip. The study abroad programs, offered 
mainly to the school of business, are called 
direct exchanges. This is when there is a direct 
tie between CLU and the international school. 
With this, all of the CLU financial aid, state 
and local, stay with the student at the other 
school. The other situation is called a broker 
program. This is when the students choose 
one of a few colleges in the desired area but 
go through a different program. With this, the 
student's state and federal aid goes, but not his 
or her CLU specific aid. 

"With the direct exchange programs, usu- 
ally your tuition here covers that. So, if you 
live here (on campus) your room and board, 
quite often, is about the same, but if you went 
to Europe you'd have to add in the airplane 
fare," Gooch said. 

Still, economic issues shouldn't get in the 
way of a student studying abroad. 

"I always tell people that even if it ends 
up that you leave some of the scholarship 
money on the table here for a semester and 
maybe even borrow a couple thousand dollars, 
in 10 years from now you'll look back and 
what you'll remember is three and a half years 
CLU and one semester in England or Thailand 
or India or Australia or wherever it might be. 
It's worth it," Gooch said. 



"I think it should be 
mandatory for every 
major to go abroad. It 
teaches about not only 
were you go but about 
yourself." 

Josh Kramer 
Senior 

The question of classes is the other main 
issue. Gooch strongly advises students to work 
with their advisors during the process. 

"Find out what you can transfer back 
and mostly also what you need," Gooch said. 
"Generally, try to think that in going abroad 
whatever you get, those units will count. Think 
of them as electives. If you could also get it to 
count for your major or core, it's just icing on 
the cake." 

The CLU office of Study Abroad can 
help students figure out what questions they 
need to be asking and evaluate the potential 
schools. CLU sophomore Lindsey Rothbaum 
is currently in the process of doing the paper- 
work work to go to Australia in the fall. 

"Everything has been really more simple 



than I thought," said Rothbaum. "I started 
thinking about going last fall when there was a 
stand for studying abroad outside the caf I still 
have to get approved, but as far as the process, 
it's been easy." 

Kramer, who studied at Marseilles in 
France last semester, is adamant about the 
importance of the study abroad programs. 

"I think it's a real shame students aren't 
taking advantage," Kramer said. "I think it 
should be mandatory for every major to go 
abroad. It teaches about not only where you 
go, but about yourself." 

Gooch. who himself studied abroad as a 
student, encourage CLU students to pursue the 
opportunity. 

"1 think the real thing is if you decide you 
want to go, you really shouldn't let anything 
stand in your way. If you really want to go 
you'll find a way to do it," Gooch said. "The 
great thing about studying abroad is it's a 
school without classroom walls. Your whole 
environment is a place to challenge, learn and 
teach. It's really wonderful." 

Anyone interested in learning more about 
studying abroad can visit CLU's Study Abroad 
website at www.clunel.edu/Campus Life/ 
SludvAhroad/ or call x3750. 



Women's Resource Center hosts art exhibition 



By Yuridia Perez 
Staff Writer 



This year, the Women's Resource 
Center decided to hold an art exhi- 
bition displaying various pieces of 
women's art to celebrate the 25th 
anniversary of Creative Options. 

Creative Options is "a day for 
women." This event is presented 
by the Women's Resource Center 
and by the American Association 
of University Women. The director 
of the Women's Resource Center, 
Kateri Alexander, and art professor 
Jerald Slattum helped put the event 
together. 

The Women's Resource Center 
sought pieces of art that were well- 
rounded and created specifically by 
women artists but were not limited 
to paintings of or revolving around 



women. Photography was also con- 
sidered. 

Artists who displayed their art 
in support of the Women's Resource 
Center for the purpose of Creative 
Options day included Valerie 
Crooks, Lisa Roger, Ashley Gibb 
and Carmel Rivello Maguire. 

Crooks's entry consisted of a 
watercolor design of "Le Matin, 
Selles, France." It included houses, 
a lake's edge, trees, pines and boats. 
The picture presented a mirror image 
of the scenery in the lake's edge. 

One of the more unique pieces 
of art was Gibb's. Called "Women's 
History," it was made using acrylic 
and paper decoupage. It revealed a 
drawing of a face that appeared to 
be excited yet half hidden at the 
same time. 

March 9 was the official day for 



"Women in the Arts: Celebrating 25 
Years of Creative Options." It took 
place in the Kwon Fong Gallery, 
where those who attend had a 
chance to meet with the Women's 
Resource Center and tour the gallery 
afterward. Some of the artists whose 
art was displayed were at the gallery 
to talk about their art. 

Upcoming Women Resource 
Center events include the Brown 
Bag Series. The next Brown Bag 
is on March 16 and is titled "Meet 
Amelia Earhart — My Cousin" with 
Ernst Tonsing. 

The Brown Bag series is held 
every Tuesday from noon to 1 p.m. 
in the E building. 

For more information, con- 
tact the Women's Resource Center 
Director Kateri Alexander at ext. 
3345. 




Photography by Bell Lopez 
student examines a piece ofarl work . 



Visit 



Echo 
online! 



COME JOIN US! 



Have you read my 

#1 bestseller? 
Therewill be a test. 



Prince of Peace Evangelical Lutheran Church's 

Campus Ministry Team invites you to join them 

for a fellowship dinner and Bible Study. Learn 

what the Bible says about Judas on: 

Thursday, March 1 8th at 6 pm. 

A FREE chili dinner will be served. 

For more information please call 

(805) 492-8943 

or email clu@princeofpeace-wels.org. 
Just 5 minutes from CLU! 
Food for the body and soul - please join us! 





3415 Erbes Rd. • (805) 492-8943 
www.princeofpeace-wels.org 



March 10, 2004 



EEATURES 



The Echo 7 



Guide for safe and lasting tattoos and piercings 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 



Tattoos and piercing are not only an 
expression of individuality but they also pro- 
vide artistic vision. Many California Lutheran 
University students have chosen to decorate 
their bodies with permanent art. 

However, responsibility comes with 
using this form of art. Maintaining a tattoo 
or piercing is important because infection or 
disfiguration of newly tattooed skin can occur 
in the early stages. 

The tattoo artist should explain how to 
maintain the tattoo or piercing for the first two 
weeks. 

The first step to any tattoo is to make sure 
that the area stays away from water, sun and 
other people's hands. The tattooed area should 
be in an incubation period. 

The second step is to remember to keep 
the tattooed area moist. The tattoo artist will 
be able to give more detail in the products that 
can be used. 

Third, do not scratch or pick at the tat- 
tooed area. This is how disfiguration can take 



place. 

After initial healing, be sure to put sun- 
screen on the tattooed area, ensuring that it will 
not fade or cause disfiguration in the future. 

To care for a piercing are to allow time 
for the pierced skin to heal properly, meaning 
no playing,or tampering with the pierced area. 
This can cause infection. 

Second, remember to gently wash the 
area entirely, and remove any crust from 
around the piercing. The professional who 
gave the piercing should be able to provide 
tips and product names for completing this 
task. The piercing also needs to breathe, mean- 
ing wearing clothing that confines the area can 
be detrimental. Sweat can cause irritation, thus 
causing infection. 

Whether one chooses to pierce or tat- 
too, remember that one's body needs to be 
maintained and treated right in order to enjoy 
the lasting effects of body art. When getting 
any body modification done, be sure to ask 
questions. 

For more information regarding tattoo 
and piercing safety, contact the Health Center 
atext. 3552. 





CLU students show off their tattoos and piercings. 



Photograph} by Bell I opez, 



Exercise is 
important for 
mental and 
physical health 

By Farima Nojoumi 
Staff Writer 

The need for exercise and a heathy 
diet is important. To keep healthy, the 
heart needs to be taken above the resting 
heart rate every so often. That doesn't 
happen surfing the net or lounging in 
front of the tube. Here are some tips to 
help keep in shape and stay healthy. It's 
easy to make some simple life changes 
now because your body is more adapt- 
able to change when you are young. 

1. Add some extra fruit and fruit 
juices to your diet. 

2. Add some more of your favorite 
veggies to your day. 

.3. Think about your food by the week 
and slowly decrease the junk food. 
4. Add more water to your diet. 

The key is to work it into your daily 
life and most importantly... have fun!! 

What's In It For Me? 

1. You will be able to do physical 
things without feeling like you're having 
a heart attack. 

2. You will feel a sense of accom- 
plishment because you have stuck to 
your goals. 

3. You will look and feel great! 

Remember that the hardest part is 
starting — just go for it! 



"The Riverboat Gamblers" full of heartache 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



The Riverboat Gamblers 
self-titled record is crucial for any- 
one in need of an album to take 
over where the MC5 and Radio 
Birdman left off. The Riverboat 
Gamblers are what The Datsuns 
and Jet wish they could be, dis- 
counting the fact that the latter 
two weren' t so horrible. 

I listened to this record for 
the first time in my car on the 



way to Target. 1 unwill- 
ingly left the car (and 

the Gamblers record), 

only to find myself tempted to do 
Pete Rose slides into the garden- 
ing tools section. The energy on 
this record is absolutely absurd. 
It is chock-full of sloppy, Wayne 
Kramer-inspired solos and lyr- 
ics about drinking, gambling 
and fighting. "The Riverboat 
Gamblers" has such a sloppy, 
whiskey-influenced sound that 
my liver quivers every time 1 
listen to it. The band brings it like 



Johnny Thunders did, but with the 
force of the Stooges. In these days 
of garage/proto-punk thievery, 
the Gamblers are gold in a sea 
of pyrite. Have no apprehension, 
kids; this is the real deal. I am late 
to the game. A friend of mine told 
me how ridiculous this record is 
six months ago. Like Lou Reed, I 
am just beginning to see the light. 
Opener "Jenna" is a drunk 
sing-along about being stood 
up. "High Rolled' is a raunchy, 
AC/DC inspired piece of Gibson 
SG/Les Paul feed trash. "Drink 



Alone" is pretty self-explanatory. 
I don' t even need to go on. 

This album is so good, only 
a stubborn, grizzled old man 
like myself would let it slip my 
grasp for a full six months. This 
record is in contention with 'The 
Starvations' "Get Well Soon" and 
'ThePogues' "Rum, Sodomy and 
the Lash" as my favorite drinking 
record. 

Again, this album is so cru- 
cial I would recommend forego- 
ing your next dental appointment 
for it. 



It's RAINing Love for CLU volunteers 



By Katie Crosbie 
Special to the Echo 



Curfews are strictly enforced. Passes 
must be obtained in order to leave for the 
weekend. Chores are to be completed in a 
timely fashion, and 80 percent of all income 
must be deposited into a savings account. 
Drugs or alcohol may not be consumed on or 
off the premises; breathalyzers and urine tests 
monitor this. 

No, these rules are not a recent addi- 
tion to the California Lutheran University 
student handbook. They are the policies of 
RADN Project Transitional Living Center in 
Camarillo, Calif, and their purpose is to help 
people become more stable. 

RAIN was founded in 1997 as a refuge 
for the homeless from the cold El Nifio weath- 
er. It has since evolved into a transitional liv- 
ing center in a newly renovated building with 
a capacity of 90 people. 

"A shelter is somewhere that people go 
overnight to get something to eat and get out 
of the cold, but then they have to leave the 
next day," said Bob Costello, a social worker 
at RAIN. "Our place is open 24 hours each 



day, 365 days every year. People come and 
live here for long periods of time; the average 
is six months." 

RAIN is funded not only by Ventura 
County, but also by the federal government 
and through private donations. This enables 
residents to take advantage of a comprehensive 
list of services. Residents are given subsidized 
childcare, transportation, counseling, food, 
supplies and a room. The facility is child- 
friendly, and educational activities take place 
on a regular basis. 

Volunteers join the staff of 24 people to 
play games with the children, tutor them and 
read to them. SophomoreAllyson Fredericksen 
and junior John Cummings first visited RAIN 
on CLU's Service Day in September. They 
have volunteered there ever since. 

"The kids are just so full of life; I can't 
help but go back," Fredericksen said. "They 
give me a better understanding of how it is 
possible to be happy without having all the 
material possessions in the world. I gain joy 
from interacting with the kids. I don't think I 
give them half as much as they give me." 

Cummings finds that volunteering at 
RAIN gives him a new perspective on life. 

"It gets my mind off myself, and 1 get 



to experience what life is like for a child who 
lives there," Cummings said. "It is a really 
supportive environment; the people who work 
there really care." 

Employees help residents secure a job 
within their first 30 days of living at RAIN. 
Residents are then required to put 80 percent of 
their earnings into a special savings account. 

"We keep it for them until they're ready 
to leave," Costello said. "Then we assist them 
in getting housing, and we equip them with 
everything we can - like donated fttmiture, 
pots and pans. We want their saved money 
to be spent on things like rent and car main- 
tenance." 

RAIN employees follow up with former 
residents for two years following their depar- 
ture. Costello said that about 80 percent of 
former residents are successful in terms of 
maintaining a steady job and managing their 
money. Volunteers such as Fredericksen and 
Cummings work to try to increase that success 
rate. 

"There are people out there who really 
need to know that others care about them," 
Cummings said. "By volunteering, college 
students really can make a difference." 



®HE lEtOH® 



8 



The Echo 



OPINION 



March 10, 2004 



When Deadhead's vote 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



"If music be the food of love, play on. " 
-William Shakespeare 

In the past year, two great musicians from 
the 1 960s have been arrested in New York on 
drug charges. Art Garfunkel, half of the duo 
Simon and Garfunkel, was arrested in January 
for possession of six grams of marijuana. 
Veteran rocker David Crosby, of Crosby, 
Stills and Nash, was arrested last Saturday for 
possession of one ounce of marijuana and a 
handgun. 

It's time the government established a 
grandfather clause for the lost minstrels of 
the Free Love Generation like Crosby and 
Garfunkel. Arresting musicians such as these 
for doing the same thing they've done for 
the last thirty or forty years is the equivalent 



of looting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. 
Although, it is possible to imagine the diaboli- 
cal cultural looting fantasies of more fanatical 
members of the Religious Right who believe 
the Beatles were Satan's worst hell-spawn, 
most Americans would be outraged at the sight 
of Dickey Belts' (the Allman Brotfiers Band) 
1957 Gibson Les Paul Electric Guitar being 
hacked to pieces and burned by an angry mob 
of preachers. Just imagine what they would do 
to Neal Young's tattered leather jacket or John 
Lennon's Sgt. Pepper's uniform. 

If the NRA members and other gun nuts 
who own banned assault weapons are protect- 
ed by grandfather clauses, it seems only fair 
that rock 'n' roll fans should be able to protect 
the living relics of the 1960s. 

After all, assault weapons kill people, 
while weed just inspires aging rockers to "keep 
on truckm"'. However, these are strange times 
and such legal disparities are to be expected 
when a half-crazed cowboy lives in the White 
House. 

Outlaw journalist Hunter S. Thompson 
once wrote, "If every Deadhead voted, this 
country would be a different place." And 
indeed it would be. Certainly Deadheads and 
others of that ilk would not stand for laws that 
require Crosby to be shackled and imprisoned 
for puffing on an oversized joint. This is not 
to say that all of America's problems would 



"If every Deadhead 
voted, this country would 
be a different place." 



Hunter S. Thompson 
Journalist 

be solved if more Deadheads went to the bal- 
lot box. Indeed, some things would be more 
difficult. Imagine what would happen if nme 
years after his death, Jerry Garcia received 
ten percent of the popular vote and caused 
an instant runoff vote between Bush and John 
Kerry. Enough of this wild gibberish — the 
sad truth here is that, unlike NRA members, 
most Deadheads don't vote. 

It is important to point out that I am not 
advocating for famous musicians to be held 
above the law. The law should come down 
with vengeance when Michael Jackson (alleg- 
edly) molests young boys or R Kelly (alleg- 
edly) urinates on underage girls. Undoubtedly, 
crimes like that deserve Punishment. 

The Law should focus on real cnminals 
and not waste taxpayer's time and money on 
recreational marijuana users like Crosby or 
Garfunkel. 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Echo, 



Visit the White House, tour the 
Smithsonian, go to the National Gallery of 
Art, attend a Congressional hearing: these 
are all things that you can do if you partici- 
pate in the Lutheran College Washington 
Semester. I am currently spending the 
semester in D.C. and have enjoyed every 
minute of it. 

Each semester, California Lutheran 
University (CLU), along with several 
other Lutheran colleges nationwide, send 
5 students to study and intern in our 
nation's Capital [sic]. A variety of intern- 
ships are available, including working for 
a senator or congressman or working with 
a non-profit advocacy group. You do not 
have to be a political science major in 
order to enjoy a semester in Washington, 
virtually every field has a connection in 
Washington. I am not a political science 
major myself; I am a double major in 



marketing communication and psychol- 
ogy. I am interning at Children's Defense 
Fund (CDF) and have gained a great 
deal of valuable, hands-on experience 
since I have been here. Some things I 
have had the opportunity to do at work 
include attending a Press Conference at 
the National Press Club and assisting in 
setting up a photo shoot for the President 
of CDF. Experiences such as these have 
provided me with an opportunity to get an 
in-depth conception of the nature of CDF 
and the Non-Profit business. 

D.C. also has a lot to offer outside 
of the workplace. There is always a lot 
to do; and, if you're not 21, there are 
nightspots designated specifically for you. 
Washington also is home to a number of 
wonderful museums, many of which have 
free admission. 

An added advantage of participat- 
ing in the Lutheran College Washington 
Semester is the housing situation. We 



live in Arlington, VA and the apartments 
are located right across the bridge from 
Georgetown and D.C. From my bal- 
cony (yes, the apartments are on the top 
floor and all have balconies) I can see 
the Washington Monument, the Capitol 
building, Georgetown and the Iwo Jima 
Memorial. 

I would recommend a semester in 
D.C. to anyone who likes to travel or 
to anyone looking to broaden his or her 
horizons. It has been a great experience 
so far for me! 

For information on the Lutheran 
College Washington Semester go to the 
CLU study abroad Web site or contact 
Professor Gooch at gooch@clunet.edu. 



Brooke Rafdal 
Sophomore 



® 


l&g ?Il<PI© 


Brett Rowland 


Nicholas Andersen 


EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 


ONLHME EDITOR 


Devon Bostock 


Brittney Carter 


NEWS EDITOR 


COPY EDITOR 


Yvette Ortiz 


Moriah Harris-Rodger 


CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 


Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 
PROOFREADERS 


CALENDAR 






Amanda Horn 


Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 


BUSINESS MANAGER 


Tawny Ingwaldson 


Roy Ehrlich 


SPORTS EDITOR 


ADVERTISING MANAGER 


Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 


Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief. The Echo. California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks. CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



TBhs lEara® 



March 10, 2004 



OPINION 



The Echo 9 



Gibson strikes cord with "Passion" 



By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



"He was pierced for our transgressions, 
he was crushed for our iniquities; the punish- 
ment that brought us peace was upon him, and 
by his wounds we are healed." Isaiah 53:5 

The wait is finally over. After months of 
heated debate and controversy, Mel Gibson's 
"The Passion of the Christ" opened on Feb. 25 
to astounding numbers, selling out numerous 
venues and catering to the madness surround- 
ing this heated religious debate. 

Several church leaders have bought out 
theaters in order to showcase the film to their 
congregation. Pastors are singing the film's 
praise from the pulpit. Parents are bringing 
their children to see the film, in order for them 
to experience the sacrifice that Christ made 
for them. 

Whatever the reason, "The Passion of the 
Christ" is well on its way to becoming one of 
the most successful films in history. The film 
took in $23.6 million on its opening day, the 
largest opening ever for an independent film, 
plus an additional $3 million in advance ticket 
sales. In its first week alone, "The Passion" 
brought in over $ 1 35 million. 

And clamor over the film has only grown 
louder since its theatrical release. Believers and 
skeptics alike have sold out theaters across the 
country to see Gibson's depiction of the final 
12 hours of the life of Jesus Christ. And with 
its release on Ash Wednesday, the beginning of 
Lent, leading up to Easter, the film shows no 
siens of slowine down. 



In fact, in a recent poll by ReelSource, 
a movie industry tracking firm, 76 percent of 
those who saw the movie would recommend 
it to others to see and 32 percent said that they 
plan on seeing "The Passion" again. 

Advance screenings were provided to 
many religious groups, opening a forum 
for many to either support or reject the 
film. Immediately, criticism arose, accusing 
Gibson's film of being anti-Semitic by imply- 
ing that the Jews were the ones responsible for 
Christ's death. 

Gibson addressed the issue in a recent 
interview with journalist Diane Sawyer. When 
asked if he was anti-Semitic, Gibson said, 
"No, of course not. For me, it goes against the 
tenets of my faith, to be racist in any form. To 
be anti-Semitic is a sin. It's been condemned 
by one Papal Council after another. There are 
encyclicals on it, which is, you know — to 
be anti-Semitic is to be un-Christian, and I'm 
not." 

So who is responsible for the death of 
Christ? "We're all responsible," he stated. 

Jim Caviezel, the actor who portrays Jesus 
in the film, agrees with Gibson. "We're all cul- 
pable for the death of Christ," said Caviezel, a 
devout Catholic. "My sins and your sins put 
him up there and that's what sacrifice is about. 
I think at the end of the day, when people see it, 
they'll realize it's a love story. It's about love, 
hope, forgiveness and sacrifice." 

Gibson cites the film as his labor of love, 
co-writing, directing and shelling out the film's 
$25 million budget out of his own pocket. 

The film is a bloody, and some say too 



By Nicole Rizkallah 
Special to the Echo 



From my art class to my business class to 
my English class and to almost every class, 1 
am bombarded with anti-American and even 
more so anti-Bush comments. I hear it from 
my classmates, but mostly I hear it from my 
professors. Everyone is entitled to his or her 
opinion, but it irritates me when teachers 
advertise their feelings in class like they are 
an authority on the issue - just do your job 
and teach me the subject you are being paid to 
teach. The worst part is they squeeze in their 
comments in between lectures so that they 
say what they want without giving students a 
chance to comment. 1 want to remind teachers 
of the influence they hold on studefits and that 
their remarks, whether true or not, need to be 
conveyed in a civilized and just manner at an 
appropriate time and place. 

If I hear one more teacher say, "America 
is the big bully that shoves around every other 
country to get its way," or "Bush is the big- 
gest idiot for going to war; I never understand 
"what the hell he is talking about," or "Thanks 



graphic, depiction of Christ's last hours and 
crucifixion on the cross. The term "passion" 
in the title is used in its original Latin context, 
meaning "suffering." 

"The reality of crucifixion and scourging 
is a harsh reality," said Gibson, explaining that 
the graphic material was essential in portray- 
ing an accurate depiction of Christ's sacrifice 
for his people. 

"I wanted it to be shocking. And I also 
wanted it to be extreme. I wanted it to push the 
viewer over the edge. And it does that. I think it 
pushes one over the edge. So, that they see the 
enormity, the enormity of that sacrifice; to see 
that someone could endure that and still come 
back with love and forgiveness, even through 
extreme pain and suffering and ridicule." 

"It is brutal but it is not gratuitous, and 
it's not just aimless violence. It's a sacrifice," 
Caviezel said. "It's the greatest love of all." 

Gibson has said the film "is my version 
of what happened, according to the Gospels 
and what I wanted to show, the aspects of it I 
wanted to show." 

He added that the film is "very violent, 
and if you don't like it, don't go, you know? 
That's it. If you want to leave halfway through, 
go ahead. You know, there's nothing that says 
you have to stay there." 

While there have been those who protest 
the film, there are many critics who applaud 
Gibson's work. 

"What Gibson has provided for me, for 
the first time in my life, is a visceral idea of 
what the Passion consisted of," said Roger 
Ebert of the Chicago-Sun Times. 



Guest Editorial 



to Bush, other countries have reason to hate 
America," I will seriously throw up. I mean 
are these teachers forgetting that this freedom 
of speech that they exercise is a privilege that 
America has granted them (which by the way 
was done so through the use of war)? Perhaps, 
they should take a sabbatical in Saudi Arabia 
or any other Middle Eastern country to realize 
how blessed they are to be living and work- 
ing in America. Instead, they proclaim how 
America is evil and does not allow other coun- 
tries to live "freely." I put the word "freely" in 
quotes because the citizens in those countries 
are far from free since they are not granted 
input into their political system and definitely 
not allowed to speak out against their country, 
lest they want a fetwah, where if a person 
speaks out against Islam there is a ransom for 
his/her murder. 

Then professors have the audacity to 
declare at every chance they get in class (time I 
am paying them for) that Bush is evil for going 
to war with Iraq. Whether you are pro-war or 
not does not matter because the underlying 
issue is that Bush's intentions were far from 
evil and there is no reason why they should be 



discussing this in class. It is highly inappropri- 
ate to advertise political opinions in class. The 
professors' job is to remain neutral, present 
both sides, and allow students to formulate 
their own opinions. 

Bush went to war to protect America 
from possible terrorist threats and to free the 
Iraqi citizens who lived in fear of their own 
government. In response to the WMD issue, 
after discovering thousands of grave sites and 
corpses of dead children, American soldiers 
said that even if they do not find WMD, the 
war was worth it In addition, Germany, 
France, England, and other countries all 
believed Iraq to be building WMD; so it is not 
just a random, crazy belief. I am not claim- 
ing there were not other reasons for going to 
war or that Bush's administration is perfect, 
but need I refresh everyone's memory of how 
gruesome Saddam Hussein treated his citizens 
and what evil truly encompasses? Okay, 
okay, I will. Hussein tortured innocent men, 
women, and children by beating them with 
various objects, tying them upside down to a 
ceiling fan and then beating them, raping them, 
throwing infants on a wall so that his/her brain 



Richard Corliss of Time Magazine said, 
"In dramatizing the torment of Jesus' last 
12 hours, he has made a serious, handsome, 
excruciating film that radiates total commit- 
ment. 

Few mainstream directors have poured so 
much of themselves into so uncompromising 
a production. Whatever the ultimate verdict 
on Gibson's "Passion," it's hard not to admire 
Gibson's passion." 

As for myself, at the end of the closing 
credits, I found myself sitting in a dark theater, 
surrounded by others who were similarly 
transfixed by what they had just seen. I was 
moved by the simplicity, yet realistic depic- 
tion of the sacrifice on which millions like me 
have based their faith. This is the core of the 
Christian belief. 

And to those who deem the film as "too 
graphic?" Shame to you. In certain aspects, I 
did not think the film was graphic enough to 
show the reality and enormity of the sacrifice 
that Christ took upon himself that day. It is 
absolutely hypocntical and ignOrant to think 
that a film that depicts the passion of Christ 
would be flowered with roses. 

This is real and if you can't accept that 
this happened, then take a second look at your- 
self and your beliefs. 

Furthermore, people are focusing on 
the wrong things in regard to this film. "The 
Passion of the Christ" is not a movie about 
who did what to whom or who is to blame; it 
is a film about who Jesus was and what he did 
for us all. It is a film about his sacrifice. And 
for that, we should all be thankful. 



would splash of the parents' faces, shocking 
them at various body parts (including the geni- 
tals), tying their feet up and beating the bot- 
toms until they bled, cutting off various body 
parts, sticking long tubes through the anus, 
and let's not forget the crucifixions he held. 
All this and I hear from my teachers that Bush 
is Evil, not Hussein! If anything, the result of 
this war was to put an end to this truly evil 
dictator; so I beg to all teachers — please stop 
with all the anti-American propaganda! The 
most interesting part is that 70% of Americans 
supported Bush's decision to go to war; yet, 
teachers parade about as if their opinions are 
in the majority. No wonder people refer to 
college as a bubble of non-reality. 

I know America is far from perfect, but 
if there is any other country you prefer to live 
in by all means leave and stop criticizing what 
I think is the best country to be part of during 
class time where I am supposed to be getting 
an "education." The sad truth is I could put 
up with all of this if I had heard at least one 
positive statement on America from at least 
one professor. Call me a dreamer, but I am 
praying for that day to come. 



Visit tfje €c()o 

onftnz at 

^x)^)o^px^unet.e5u/ec()o 



Don I Forget to 
attend Thai Night! 

When: Today at 6 p.m. 
Where: Nygreen 1 
What: Information on 
Thailand 



®3J« ^(031® 



jjj The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 10, 2004 



Kingsmen baseball wins four more, 
adding to six-game winning streak 





Photograph by Kyle Pcicrson 
Junior Clay Alarcon slides safely into third base. Alarcon hit two grand-slams in this week's play. 



h by Kyle Pclcrson 
Sophomore Matt Hirsh releases a pitch to the batter. 
Hirsh carried a no-hitter into the eighth inning. 

By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
baseball team had an outstanding week, 
winning all four games it played this 



week. 

CLU took on Ohio Northern on 
Thursday, March 4. The Kingsmen scored 
six runs in the fourth to push CLU to a lead 
of 12-3. 

"Ohio Northern was a young team. 
They had 16 freshmen, but they played 
pretty well for being so young. I thought 
that we went out there and played well. 
Not all the starters played, so it was good 
to see some of the other guys out there," 
junior Billy Weber said. 

Junior Clay Alarcon had an outstand- 
ing day; he smashed a grand-slam home 
run to left center. Alacron and junior David 
Ramirez had six of CLU's hits. Ramirez 



also had three RBIs, while senior Jake 
Highsmith plated two. 

Weber picked up the win, only giving 
up two runs on five hits, while striking out 
four in five innings. 

The Kingsmen took on Occidental on 
Friday, March 5. It was an easy win for the 
Kingsmen, as they crushed the Tigers 12- 
0. This is also the fourth win in a row for 
the Kingsmen. 

Alacron had another grand-slam home 
run and crossed the plate four times. Junior 
Danny Chapparo, senior Johnnie Machado 
and junior Mike Cerda had a pair of hits. 
Alacron, Chapparo and junior Simon 



Lozano all stole bases. 

"Matt Hirsh pitched a good game, and 
defense did its best to keep no hits going," 
senior Ryan Hostetler said. "We all sup- 
ported him, and we came out victorious." 

The Kingsmen again took on 
Occidental Saturday, March 6. The 
Kingsmen won the double-header by 
beating them in the first game, 10-1, and 
crushing them in a scorefest of 29-0 in the 
second game. 

Alacron continued his hot streak by 
hitting home runs in both games. He went 
two-for-five with four RBIs. In game 
two, he went four-for-five with a homer 
and three singles. Lozano and junior Jeff 
Cummings smacked a pair of home runs 
with Curnming's home run a grand-slam. 
Senior Ed Edsall also went yard. Senior 
Mike Kaczowka, senior Geoff Buchanan 
and Hostetler joined Alacron with long 
balls. Junior Jon Calmes picked up the 
win, opening with four strike-outs. 

"We just played as a team. The nine 
guys that go out there know what to do 
and get the job done. It is going to be hard 
for any team to beat us; they either have 
to come out at the top of their game or we 
would have to make a bunch of mistakes," 
Hostetler said. "We really did well this 
week. I am proud of the team." 



Softball takes two from Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 




Photograph by Todd Kuglcr 
Freshman Danielle Everson is just about to release 
the ball in hopes of sinking out her opponent. 

By Scott Flanders 

Sports Info Director 

The California Lutheran University 
Softball team won both games of a dou- 



ble-header against conference opponent 
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps on Saturday. 
The Rcgals won the first game 6-2 and 
pulled out the second game in dramatic 
fashion, winning 7-6. 

Cal Lutheran upped its record to 
(3-10, 2-5) while the Athcnas dropped 
to (8-5, 4-2). 

In game one, the Regals put up 
three runs in the first inning and let 
pitcher Danielle Everson coast the rest 
of the way. Cal Lutheran picked up 
three more runs in the fifth inning to 
ensure the victory. 

Monica Schallcrt had two hits, two 
RBl's, two stolen bases and scored a 
run. Carrie Mitchell added two hits and 
a run scored. Danielle Everson pitched 
all seven innings for the Rcgals and 
allowed just two runs while picking up 
her first win of the season. 

Ashley Fricks pitched six innings 
for Clarcmont and gave up six runs 
(five earned runs). KJrstin Wilson and 
Kxisten Linscott each added two hits 




Photograph by Todd Kughn 

Close call! Senior Emily Olineru has her fool on the base, ready to make the catch. 



for the Athenas. 

In the second game, Cal Lutheran 
got off to a fast start again. The Regals 
scored four runs in the first two innings. 
They would hold the lead untill the top 
of the seventh when the Athenas put 
together three runs to give themselves 
a two-run lead. In the bottom of the 
inning, the Regals scored three runs to 
win their third game of the season. 



Olivia Chacon pitched a complete 
game for Cal Lutheran and notched her 
second victory of the season. Carrie 
Mitchell scored twice for the Regals, 
and Shannon Tcvcrbaugh had two 
RBIs. 

Kristcn Linscott was credited with 
the loss for Claremont. Kirstin Wilson 
put together three hits, two stolen bases 
and a run scored in the losing effort. 



Congratulations Ashleigh Poulin 

First Place: 3 -meter diving event 
@ SCIAC Championships 



Congratulations 
Zareh Avedian 



Congratulations Ryan Hodges 
All-SCIAC 
Second Team 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn $2800-3500+ 



www.workatcamD.com 



March 10, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 11 



Dance team decides to have fun 



" lb - 


. Li " i 


1X1 


/*Nvi ^ 


1 • - \ 1 


jJT^^ 




^ '1 


\ ^ 


v 
^ 




Photograph Courtesy of Lauren Powell 
Dancers pose for the camera before their performance at half-time. Not pictured: Kira Waddell, Ashley Reagan. 

perform on the field or court during half-time. 



By Tawny Ingwaldson 
Sports Editor 



For many years, the university's sports 
teams have been privileged to have the 
California Lutheran University dance team 



This established club has been entertain- 
ing CLU crowds for many years. Despite its 
decision to start moving away from being so 
senous and including more lighthearted, fun- 
based routines, this year's dancers have proved 



The CLU dance team shows off their stuff during 
to the audience that their routines take a lot of 
practice. 

"A lot of the students see us perform and 
it looks fun, but we dedicate a lot of time to 
these performances," senior co-captain Lauren 
Powell said. "There is so much hard work and 
effort that goes into it." 

The dancers recently decided to put more 
personality into their performances rather than 
sticking only to basic dance technique. 

"We have taken a more sexual route with 
our routines," senior co-captain Jeda Higgs 
said. "We do a lot of body-rolls and head- 
thrashing." 

After try outs for the '03-04 dance team, 
captains junior Kari Bygd, Higgs and Powell 



Photograph by Kyle Peterson 

the last men s basketball home game of the season. 
decided to start a dance camp. 

"At 7:30 a.m., we would run through 
conditioning and technique classes," Bygd 
said. "After that, we would break for lunch in 
the cafeteria. Then, we would come back and 
practice our routines." 

Camp allowed the team to bond as the 
members pushed one another to improve their 
skills. 

The team's dedication to dance means 
that each performance improves on the one 
before. 

"The dances keep getting harder because 
the dancers keep getting better," Powell said. 

The dance team will be holding try outs 
for the '04-05 season after spnng break. 



Cheerleading has new reputation 




By Tawny Ingwaldson 
Sports Editor 



The CLU cheerleaders perform the "Swedish falls" stunt 
at half-time during the Kingsmen basketball game 



Starting off a season with an unfavorable 
reputation is never easy, but it is something 
the l 03-04 California Lutheran University 
cheerleaders must deal with and overcome. 
Cheerleading at CLU hasn't been taken seri- 
ously in previous years. 

Freshman co-captain Megan Pappas 
knew during try outs what she was getting 
herself into. 

"I was totally aware of the reputation 
before, and this year the goal was to change 
everyone's perspective," Pappas said. 

Junior co-captain Mady Stacy is the 
only returning member from the '02-03 cheer 
squad. 

"This year, we are taking it to another 
level," Stacy said. 

Audiences may take that comment liter- 

/] ally, as the cheerleaders perfectly executed the 

Swedish falls" stunt at their last performance 

.olograph by Kyle Peicrson of the year. "Swedish falls" is a three-stack 

stunt in which the bases (the women on bot- 



tom) hold flyers (the women in the air), who 
hold flyers on top of them. 

This is no easy feat; it takes practice, 
determination and trust to put on a crowd- 
pleasing performance. 

S.unting requires an exceptional amount 
of trust. The bases need to feel confident that 
the flyer will not lose focus in the air, and the 
flyer needs to have no doubt that the bases will 
catch her if something goes wrong. 

"It is hard, at first, to learn to trust new 
people," freshman co-captain Jenny Jarre II 
said. 

Nobody from this year's squad had 
cheered together before, so the women had 
to start from scratch in everything, including 
trusting one another. 

Over the season, the CLU cheerleaders 
have doubled themselves, finishing the year 
with 1 1 members. 

"Cheer really does take a lot of work, just 
like any other sport," Stacy said. "Sometimes 
we don't really get the credit we deserve." 

Cheerleading try outs for the '04-05 
cheer squad will be held on April 1 5, 2004. 




Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
Freshman Jenny Jarrell keeps her balance in the 
air while performing an arabesque. 



Track and field has impressive performance 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
men's and women's track and field 
teams attended the SCIAC Multi-Dual 
men's event, held at Claremont on 
March 5. and the SCIAC Multi-Dual 
women's event, held at Whittier on 
March 6. 

On the men's side, senior Barry 
Tolli won the 200m with a time of 
21.69 seconds. 

Junior Mike Alexander ran the 
100m in 11.01 seconds. 



The 4x100m relay team com- 
posed of Alexander, Tolli, junior 
Jon Siebrecht and sophomore Derek 
Rogers had the second fastest time in 
the SCIAC track competition. 

"We all ran really good legs. La 
Verne pulled it out at the end, but we'll 
get them next time," Siebrecht said. 

For the throwing events, the CLU 
men's team was lead by sophomore 
Adrian Cruz and sophomore Gabe 
Leon who competed in the shot put, 
discus and hammer. The two combined 
led CLU in all three events, but were 
not able to snatch first place. 



At Whittier, during the Multi-Dual 
women's event, the Regals posted 
impressive scores. 

The highlights for the Regals were 
senior captain Dereem McKinney mak- 
ing the "Chalk Club" in the shot put by 
throwing 30 feet, making a personal 
record this weekend. 

Junior Ashleigh Poulin, who is the 
only Regal pole vaulter, met her record 
for last year at 9'6". 

Denise French took fifth place in 
the 400m with a time of 62.5 seconds. 

Head Coach Scott Fickerson has 
been the coach of the track and field 



team for three years. 

"I was pleased with the perfor- 
mance of the team, and we are right on 
task for the SCIAC championships in 
April," Fickerson said. 

The next events that the CLU track 
and field team will be participating in 
will be on Thursday, March 18, at the 
Cal State Northndge Multi-Event start- 
ing at 9 a.m. and finishing on Friday, 
March 19. Also on Friday, the CLU 
runners will attend the Occidental 
Distance Carnival starting at 6 p.m., 
hosted by Occidental College, in Los 
Angeles. 



12 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 10, 2004 



Two strokes defeats men's golf team 




Photograph courtesy of Kyle Laubach 
"Are you too good for your home, " sophomore Peder 
Nyhus wonders as he putts the ball. 
By Cassandra Wolf 
Stakf Writer 



The Kingsmen golf team placed 3-3 
overall and 1-3 in the SCIAC after one 



loss to Pomona-Pitzer College and one 
win over Chapman University. 

The Kingsmen lost to the Sagehens, 
304-306, on March 4. Freshman Christian 
Colunga finished the par-72 course with 
a 72. Junior Jason Poyser shot a 76, 
sophomore Peder Nyhus, senior Jordan 
Silvertrust and freshman Tyler Doyle shot 
a 79 and freshman Nick Verner shot an 
80. 

Bumpy greens and heavy wind were 
difficulties during the match. 

"Today was kind of disappointing, 
because we should have won," Silvertrust 
said. "Losing by two strokes isn't fun, 
because you can always look back and see 
where you could have saved a few strokes. 
We lost three tournaments by a total of 10 
strokes. 

"We were pretty close," Poyser said. 
"Unfortunately, they just beat us by two 
strokes. It was a close match. We didn't 
play our best." 

The Kingsmen golf team defeated the 
Panthers, 308-341, as Colunga completed 
the par-72 course at Tustin Ranch 2-up. 



Nyhus shot a 75, Doyle shot a 78 and 
Silvertrust finished with an 81. Poyser 
and Vemer followed with an 82 and an 87, 
respectively. 

"We knew we were going to win, 
but it was about playing the golf course," 
Silvertrust said. "The greens were punched, 
or airified, so they stay green. One or two 
of the guys played fine with it, but it was 
difficult for me." 

"It went pretty well for the most part, 
since none of us had seen the course," 
Nyhus said. "The greens were bumpy and 
you could tell the course had been rained 
on recently," Nyhus said. 

The team faces the University of 
Redlands Bulldogs at home at Sterling 
Hills Golf Course on March 11 and then 
competes in the two-day Huntington 
Invitational on March 15-16. 

"Thursday's a big match. The course 
we're playing is fairly easy, a little shorter 
than some other courses we played and 
not that many trees. We've definitely dug 
ourselves in a hole, even though we're 3- 
3 [overall] right now. The whole team, in 



general, knows we could be playing a little 
better," Silvertrust said. 

"I think we're headed in the 
right direction. It'll be a good match. 
I think we're ready for Thursday," 
Nyhus said. "But the big match is 
going to be next week so we need to 
pick up a win against Redlands. We 
need to set the tone for our tourna- 
ment in Atlanta. It's been nice to see 
Christian and Tyler play well for us as 
freshmen." 

"The whole team has high hopes 
for next month," Silvertrust said. 
"That could be a big turning point for 
where we end up in the SCIAC." 

"Losing by two strokes 
isn't fun, because you 
can always look back 
and see where you 
could have saved a few 
strokes." 

Jordan Silvertrust 
Senior 



Regals beat Eagles First season for water polo 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



The No. 18 California Lutheran 
University Regals tennis team defeated 
the No. 30 Mary Washington Eagles on 
Saturday March 6, by a score of 7-2 in 
Thousand Oaks, Calif. 

The Regals easily got their first three 
points in doubles play, starting strong to get 
ahead. 

"We didn't know what to expect from 
this team so we wanted to put on a good 
fight at the very start," said sophomore Blair 
Murphy, who played No. 3 for the Regals in 
this match-up. 

The Regals had to endure the losses of 
two key players in this match due to injury. 
No. 47 nationally-ranked player senior 
Rebecca Hunau only played doubles and 
Stephanie Perkins was absent in this match. 

No. 1 singles, Jen Hansen, CLU 
defeated Ashley Tucker, MW 6-0, 6-3, 
No. 2 Lisa Novajosky, CLU defeated Kim 
Colwell, MW 6-1,6-2. No. 3 Murphy, CLU 



defeated Gayle Smith, M W 6-4, 6-4, and No. 
4 Brianna Smalling, CLU defeated Lindsay 
McMahon, MW 6-2, 6-2. 

These were the four points won by the 
Regals in singles play. The other three points 
were obtained when the Regals swept in 
doubles not giving more than six games in 
the eight game pro-sets. 

"I think we did really well in this match 
today since we are two players short from 
our starting line up. We hope to see Becca 
and Stephanie back on the courts this week," 
said junior Lisa Novajosky. Novajosky won 
both her singles and doubles matches against 
the Eagles. 

The Regals next match will be against 
Washington University, who is currently the 
No. 1 2 team in the nation. 

"This match today was generally a 
good one to get us ready for our next match 
against Washington University," said Head 
Coach Nancy Garrison. "They are going to 
be playing all the higher ranked SCIAC 
teams so this will be a good test to see 
where we are in the scheme of things." 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's water polo team had its first 
meet in CLU history on Friday, Feb. 
27. 

The Regals took on the Michigan 
Wolverines, a Division I school, at Oaks 
Christian School. The Regals fought 
hard, but lost to the Wolverines, 16-4. 

Sophomore Kim Thomas scored the 
first goal in CLU history during the first 
quarter; she also scored another goal in 
the fourth quarter. Freshmen goalkeeper 
Kayla Schrock had nine saves. 

"It was very exciting to be the first 
team and the first goalie of the women's 
water polo team. Michigan was a tough 
team to play in our first game, but they 
were really nice and taught us a lot," 
Schrock said. 

The Regals set out to play in their 
first tournament, March 5-7. Their first 
game was against Sonoma State, a 



Division II school, on Friday, Mar. 5. 
They were crushed by Sonoma, losing 
to them, 6-14. 

"We worked hard and played 
the best that we could have played," 
freshmen Scarlett Williams said. 

The Regals showed signs of 
improvement taking on UC Davis, 
a Division II school, Saturday, Mar. 
6. They fell short, losing to them 6- 
8. They then took on Saint "Mary's 
College, but once again came up short, 
losing 8-11. 

On Sunday, Mar. 7, the Regals 
played against Hayward; they fought 
hard but just couldn't catch up. They 
eventually lost to Hayward, 4-14. 

"We played hard, and we have 
bonded over the six games that we 
have played. I believe that we are 
improving at a very fast rate. So far, 
we are doing better then the boys team 
did," freshmen Michele Hernandez 
said. "I hope we continue to improve 
in the future." 




Get the Best Dates and find the person you Deserve with the Right Photo! 
tt's Easy! We'll replace your existing Online Photo with a Professional Portrait that , J f 

will Guarantee your Picture will go from Meek to Sleek! If you don't have a picture yet, La f 
call us for your new Online Portrait. First impressions are everything! A Picture is worth a 1000 words! 
Package includes: 
• Half Hour Portrait Session • 20-25 Online Photo proofs 
• 2 final Ptiolos formatted & retouched lor your online service emailed lo you 
• Free Custom 8x10"- Available in Color and Black & White. ONLY $125 Reg. $299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

If you're going to tind a date on the Web, you better have a really good picture"-The New York Times 



HEADSHOT HIGHWAY 

Portraits for Online Dating ... 



TOSn ffi 



*A (BeautifuC Loort 

Pull-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805) 492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

41 1 E. Avenue de Los Arboles in Thousand Oiiks 
Neur Rite Aid .ind Whole Foods 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 19 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Regals tennis beats No. 
12-ranked Washington U. 



See story page 8 



March 17, 2004 



Features 

CLU community service partner, MANNA, provides food to those 
in need. 



See story page 5 



News 

Career Services holds annual 
Career Expo. 



See story page 3 




Members of the Old West team rush to find their shoes in this year's new game "Shoe 
Stew." 

Cal Lutheran holds 
annual Siblings Weekend 



Javier Cerda of the Thompson team had to eat 
Vienna Sausages during "Scarf and Barf ." 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



Every year, California Lutheran University invites 
the siblings of current CLU students to stay the weekend, 
participate in planned events and get a look into how their 
older brothers and sisters live. Almost 80 siblings partici- 
pated in the weekend of March 12-14. The weekend was 
sponsored by the Residence Hall Association. 

The weekend's events included Club Lu bowling 
night at Harley's Bowling Alley in Camarillo, Calif, on 
Friday, and Wacky Wild Hall Olympics on Saturday. 

Friday night's program started at 7 p.m. with two 
hours set aside for students with siblings to bowl. At 9 
p.m., the regular Club Lu started, allowing in only current 
CLU students. 

Saturday morning started with a brunch, during 
which siblings were allowed to eat in the Caf with their 
brothers and sisters. Afterward, teams were put together 
for each residence hall to compete in the Wacky Wild Hall 
Olympics. 

"[WWHO] is a lot of fun!" said game host Holly 
Hoppman. 

All six teams, one from each hall or hall complex, 
had to have 15 players to participate. The teams then 
designed themed T-shirts as uniforms. The shirts were 
judged for points as part of the game. 

WWHO consisted of 10 games, ranging from the 
annual "Scarf and Barf," in which 15 edible, but not 
always pleasant, items need to be consumed, to making a 
human pyramid, to a new game called "Shoe Stew." 

In "Shoe Stew," all of the participants threw their 
shoes into a pile that was mixed up by the judges. The 
team that found all their own shoes, put them back on and 
sat down the fastest won. 




Points were awarded for each game. Winners 
of each game got six points, second place got five 
points and so on. Every team gets at least one 
point for participation, as last place is worth one 
point. 

"[This year,] WWHO was dominated by 
Pederson," RHA's Programming Chair Beckie 
Lewis said. "The new games were well-received, 
and the judges were very intent on being fair. The 
teams had fun and enjoyed participating. The 
shirts were very creative." 

Pederson won the event, taking the spirit stick 
away from Mt. Clef, who won hall caroling last The New West team creates its version of the human 
semester. Thompson Hall placed second and New pyramid. 
West captured third. 

Saturday night did not have a program 
planned so that siblings could spend time together 
however they wanted. 

"Overall, I think Siblings Weekend went very 
well. We had less arranged this year to give siblings 
a chance to do things together that they wanted to 
do, and I feel that doing things this way went over 
well. I also saw more parents here checking in sib- 
lings that I've seen in past years," Lewis said. 

The weekend events culminated in one last 
brunch in the Caf on Sunday morning, followed by 
the sibling send-off when it was time to go home. 

Club Lu bowling and WWHO were the last 
two campuswide events that RHA will put on 
before it disbands in late April. 

"We are really happy with the way the week- 
end went. Both bowling and WWHO were very 
successful. We were happy to finish as a board on 
such a positive note," RHA Director Alex Mallen 
said 




Mt. Clef celebrates a win in one of the day's events. 
All photographs by Stephanie Shaker 



The Echo 



Calendar 



MARCH 17, 2004 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

march 17 



Worship 

Chape] 
10:10 a.m. 

Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 



Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 



Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 

9 p.m. 




Saturday 

march 20 



monday 

march 22 




The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

march 19 



thursday 

march 18 



Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Mogen Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Support Group for Eating Disorder 
Recoverers 

F-Building 
6 p.m. 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Club LU: CLW 

Gym 

9 p.m. 




Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Sunday Q*j£ 

march 21 t\ 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Field 
10 a.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6: 15 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
9 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen I 
6:30 p.m. 



ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 i^ 

8:30 p.m. 



tuesday 

march 23 



* 




ASCLU General Elections 

SUB 
9 a.m. 

CSC Blood Drive 

SUB 

9 a.m. 



This week, host Jimmy Pox has a special guest: 

KRITTER!!!! 

Kritter is a CLW wrestler and will l><' joining Jimmv I Ij 
Fox this Wednesday al 10:30 p.m. on Channel 10. I 

Also this week on Pox Sports: 

| "Top 10 Moments in CLW His 




BSU; BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 



Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, & FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME ! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Prvor Hall 

(80S) 493-3951 

BSU Adviser 



classif ieds 

Room Jor Rent: In Moorpark. M/F. non-smok- 
er, students only, meal plan and DSL available 
(extra). $6(X)/monlh 

If interested, page: 
(805) 378-6092 

Tutors Reeded: $I5-$18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT 1 Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required. Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SAT 1/11, GRE. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 u. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 9003S 

or fax resume to: (310) 282-6424 

or email resume to: 

instructorhiring6@aceeducation.com 

Classified ads can be placed 
on the Calendar page for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and clarity. 
Call: 
(SO?) 495-5865 



GRADUATION ISSUE: 



If you want to send a graduation shout out or 
special message to someone in the graduating 

class of 2004, then let us know! 

Email your message to: echo@clunel.edu with 

the subject line: "Graduation Issue" or send by 

intercampus mail to: Box 3650 or drop it off @ 

the ECHO office. 

Text only messages: $15 

Add a picture for: $5 

(Emailed pictures need to be sconned @ 300 dpi) 

Messages and payment must be received no later 
than April 26th. 

If any questions, contact: 
Amanda or Roy at (805) 493-3865 



luosday. March 23, 2004 

7pm fn th. Nelian Room near the Caf.teria 

Free Pizza and Sodas! 



Fifth Year in A Ro 



„!! 



r ORUM 

?004 



Come join the Guys off CLU to discuss 
everything and anything ffrom our prob- 
lems with the ladles to our problems 
with classes... 

No Limits to what we can talk about! 
UNCENSORED AND FOR THE FELLAS 



m 



S ** jr> p> «(> -r- » 

Services 



r 493-3S20 in I 




Asian Club and 
Friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and FRIENDS! 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori, president 

(818) 590-7625 



Where are YOU going? 

Come find out more ot trie 

Siudy Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 or x3750 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon - Tnur., 72 to ? p.m. 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 

Summer Day Camps seek General Counselors & Specialist In- 
structors. Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff can earn $2800 
$3500+ for the summer working with children outdoors 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit www.workatcamp.com 



SMeni Klumm Association 



s <2 



Tuesday, March 30, 200? 

7-30 PM~ Nygreen 2 & ^ 



$50 Best Buy Gift: 
Card Giveaway 



ppor *Ut>ntes? 



service < 



Come ttear 
C formal* 



1" 



gpea 



tiers 



$ 



"Free Pizza 
4- DrinKs 



<& 



.& 



Come learn more about the new 
SAA a-c CLCJ- 



DO VOU HAVE THE WRITE STUFF ? 

^3ci At Th' s Workshop Will Teach You 



B. How 10 write an At paper. 
SlIDDOrt ' ^ ow (0 ^ ! ' lc n ^ 1 ' wor( ^ s l " 
_ , illustrate your point. 

SerVICeS . How to build and follow an 

UL.t*lUt.5-JI oullilK - 
' . How to have a beginning, 

middle, and end to your papers. 



Tins Woricshop will be offered twice. 
Maiehl0lh3-4p.ni. 

Manh IllhUpm 
Nygreen 5 

Contact Tuula with any 

aueslitns! 

(805)493-3261 




tEjre ^chhob 



March 17, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Students meet prospective employers at expo 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



More than 200 California Lutheran 
University students and 51 companies 
turned out for CLU's annual Career Expo 
on Wednesday, March 10. The yearly spring 
event, which is scheduled to accommodate stu- 
dents graduating in May, gives area employers 
and CLU students a chance to discuss full-time 
positions and internship opportunities. 

"It's a good time for students to talk to 
companies and network face-to-face with rep- 
resentatives from various organizations," said 
Cynthia Smith, career counselor and recruit- 
ment coordinator of CLU's Career Services. 
"Even if a specific department you are inter- 
ested is not here, we recommend that students 
introduce themselves to the recruiter and find 

"[Career Expo] is a good 
time for students to 
talk to companies and 
network face-to-face with 
representatives from 
various organizations." 

Cynthia Smith 
Career Counselor 

out where to send their resumes." 

"The feedback from employers [about 
the expo] has been very positive and mutually 
beneficial, such that they return from year to 
year. Last year we had between 300 to 400 
students attend the expo. This year close to 



200 students registered, and we expect that this 
year will be as good or better," Smith said. 

"It worked for me," said Ian Brown, a 
2003 CLU finance alumnus. "I went to this 
job fair last year. I approached the Beneficial 
Financial table and liked the recruiters. They 
encouraged me to visit the office, and although 
I was wary, I really liked it I began working 
as an intern and was able to move up to the 
account executive position I currently hold 
within a year's time. Now I am the one talk-, 
ing to students at this year's expo. I guess you 
could say I am proof that this event works." 

"We have been recruiting at CLU for 
more than a decade. The quality [of poten- 
tial employee] here is good. Our company is 
very community-centered, and that is why we 
come here to recruit. As a mortgage company, 
our customers need to be able to trust us and 
know that we have their interests at heart. It 
benefits us to have people who live and have 
gone to school within a community working 
for us. It's just common sense," said William 
Marentette, a district manager for Beneficial 
Financial. 

Desiree Molnar-Southon, an area assis- 
tant supervisor for the Institute for Applied 
Behavior Analysis, has recruited at the Career 
Expo for the last three years. 1ABA is an 
organization that helps connect individuals 
with a developmental disability with greater 
opportunity. 

"It helps us to employ people with better 
educations. The more staff we can hire, the 
more customers in the community we can take 
on. So it helps the community, too," Molnar- 
Southon said. "It has been very advantageous 



for us to return. [The Career Expo] has done 
very well for us." 

"Attending the expo is a good start for 
someone entenng the job market," said MBA 
graduate student Emma Besilets. "I came out 
today to give my resume to Pfizer. I am not 
finished with my program until June, but I am 
trying to be proactive by checking things out 
now and to see what is available in the com- 



munity when I graduate. It's just nice to see 
what is out there." 

Students who are interested in learning 
more about employment opportunities or avail- 
able internships should contact Smith at x3 1 96 
or Cindy Lewis at x3199 at CLU's Career 
Services Center. Students may also browse 
current job postings at www.jobpostings.net/ 
California. 




Seniors participate 
in disorientation 



Photograph by Todd Kugler 

Senior Kyle Wells speaks with Army Sgt. ist Class Timothy Waad. 

ASCLU discusses issues 
in weekly meeting 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



Seniors at California Lutheran University 
took part in the university's annual Senior 
Disorientation on Tuesday, March 9. 

The event was designed to provide 
seniors with useful tips on how to cope with 
life after graduation. 

"Senior Disorientation has been held in 
past years. The event takes place in order to 
aid seniors in the transition from college to 
life after college," said ARC/Coordinator of 
Student Programs Margaret Miller. 

"[Senior Disorientation] was done at 
a very necessary time because this is when 
everything hits and becomes very overwhelm- 
ing," senior Julie Norman said. 

Nearly 40 seniors attended the event, 
which featured several speakers ranging from 
Cal Lutheran alumni to staff members. 

Associate Dean of Students Michael 
Fuller and Director of Alumni Development/ 
Relations Elaine Benditson kick-started the 
event with a welcoming speech, which was 
followed by few words from Director of 



Career Services Cindy Lewis. 

A alumnus Brian McCoy spoke to 
seniors about how to manage their finances 
after graduation. 

Director of Clinical Supervision Jim 
Schmidt closed out the event by speaking to 
seniors about post-college life. 

Speakers also addressed the issue of 
careers and graduate school and conducted 
a table discussion, which was designed to 
answer any questions that the seniors might 
have had. 

"[The highlight of the event] was students 
gaining information to assist them in their tran- 
sition and the ability to ask alumni any ques- 
tions they might have while going through the 
transition and preparing for graduation and 
what happens after graduation," Miller said. 

"Coming to the realization that four years 
have gone by in a heartbeat and that gradua- 
tion is right around' the comer scares me just 
a bit," senior Jon Gonzales said "The best 
advice that I received was to tell everyone that 
impacted me in any way that I care about them 
because you never know if or when you will 
get that chance to do that ever again." 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Gel the Best Dates aid find the person jou Deserre with the Right Photo! 
It's Easy! We'l replace your easting Onfrie Photo wtti a Professional Rxtrailthal 
wS Guarantee your Picture wfl go trom Meek to Sleek! U you don! rave a picture yet, 
caH us for your new CWne Portrait First repressions are everylnng 1 A Picture is worth a 1000 words! 
Package tnclu^ey; 
* Hail Hour Portrail Session « 20-25 Online Pholo proofs 
• 2 final Photos formatted & retouched for your onine service emailed to you 
• Free Custom 8x10** Available in Color and Black & White. ONLY $125 Reg. $299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

trie Web, you better have a really good piclure'-The New York Times 

SHOT HIGHWAY m* m 

ails for Online Dating ... l"& I W 



At its recent meeting, Senate discussed 
a number of different projects that it is cur- 
rently working on, such as lighting on campus, 
benches at the Cross and better use of library 
resources, as well as a new bylaw amend- 
ment. 

The most important issue of the night was 
the bylaw amendment proposal presented by 
freshman Kevin Jussel. The amendment would 
change the ways in which bills were presented 
and voted on by Senate. Senators had mixed 
emotions about the proposed changes. 

"It is good if we have something keep- 
ing us back and holding our word," At-large 
Senator Dominic Storelli said. 

One of the proposals in the amendment 
would require senators to present their bill dur- 
ing the Monday meeting and then have a copy 
of the bill in each senator's box by Friday. 

"If it is brought up Monday, you have 
time to ask questions," junior Senator Jared 
Perry said. 

Senate Director Jason Soyster discussed 
the importance of each committee focusing 
on one project to work on for the next two 
months. 

The Indoor Structural committee is 
contemplating the idea of working with the 
Capital Campaign. 

Senior Senator Rachel Eskesen stated 
that as part of the Academic committee, "We 
are talking about how people can better utilize 
the librarians. They are specialized in specific 



The Academics Committee also dis- 
cussed putting up a new map of where books 
can be found in the library after renovations 
this summer are completed. 

Storelli said that, with regard to the 
Outdoor Structural committee, "Jared is plan- 
ning on the benches and where everything is 
going." 

He also said that the committee is check- 
ing to see if it is feasible to put more trees 
outside Mogen Hall. 

"We are talking about 
how people can better 
utilize the librarians." 



Rachel Eskesen 
Senior Senator 

As part of the Outdoor Structural com- 
mittee, freshman Senator Bethany Bengtson 
introduced a new bill proposing better lighting 
on carnpus. The bill will be voted on at the next 
Senate meeting. 

"For most of the houses, they don't have 
lights in front of them. That is a concern, so 
maybe a sensor light could be put in," Storelli 
said. 

The Campus Life Committee is currently 
working on talking with Facilities to purchase 
tables that would be put outside of the univer- 
sity commons as well as working on a bill to 
give funding to the Audio Visual Club. 



■aijHf ^<sh® 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



March 17, 2004 



What do you like the best or least at CLU? 




Emma Holman. accounting, 2006 



Emiliano Gonzalez, business, 2006 



Adrianna Fildes, criminal justice, 2004 



Chelsea Ward, communication. 2007 



"I like the fact that it takes two minutes "I don't like how residence life treats us "I like that the classroom sizes are small "The best and worst things are that it's 

to walk to class." like babies." and you get to know your teachers on a per- small. It's good for classes, but it sucks for a 

sonal level." social life." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Bell Lopez. 



Car of the Week Spring Break travel tips 

1. Make sure you have a signed, valid passport and visas, if required. 
Also, before you go, fill in the emergency information page of your pass- 
port. 

2. Read the Consular Information Sheets (and Public Announcements or 
Travel Warnings, if applicable) for countries you plan to visit. 

3. Make sure you have insurance that will cover your emergency medical 
needs while you are overseas. 

4. Familiarize yourself with local laws and customs of the countries to 
which you are traveling. Remember, while in a foreign country, you are 
subject to its laws. 

5. Do not leave luggage unattended in public areas. 

Don't forget to see 




Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson 

Sophomore Jackie Straw stands behind her 1967 Chevelle Malibu. Under her 
SS hood, her built 350 cu. in. rumbles through dual Flowmasters. Since this is 
her first and only car, Jackie is proud to drive it daily. 





Think your car could 

be named 
"Car of the Week"? 

Call Kyle at x2791. 





"Isabella Met a Fella" 

and "Hamlet, Disco Dane 

of Denmark" tomorrow at 

8 p.m. in the Forum. 



IK ^BeautifuC Look 

Full-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805) 492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

4 1 1 E. Avenue de Los Arboles in Thousand Oaks 
Near Rite Aid and Whole Foods 



Hod Nights? Cool Trips? 
Killer Deals? 



This ain't tjour porencs' travel agenctj... it's uours. 




%C5 jEcJJCffi 



March 17, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



Valparaiso University Chamber Concert Band inspires 



By Tina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



The Valparaiso University Chamber 
Concert Band concluded its California tour 
with a concert Thursday evening at 8 p.m. in 
Samuelson Chapel. The band, hailing from 
Valparaiso. Ind., has performed in nine dif- 
ferent California cities and in Las Vegas. The 
concerts took place in Lutheran churches, a 
middle school, high schools, a university and 
a music center. 

The concert lasted about two hours and 
was conducted by Jeffrey Scott Doebler. The 
first part consisted of contemporary music like 
"October" and "Yankee Doodle." After the 
intermission, the second part was music in the 
style of John Philip Sousa, famous musician 
from the 1800s. This part consisted of patriotic 
works like "The Liberty Bell," "Atlantic City 
Pageant" and "God Bless America" 

DoeblermetCalifomia Lutheran University 
music professor Daniel Geeting when Geeting 
went out to Valparaiso University. 

"He said 'come out if you ever get the 




Photograph by Claire Hillard 
Students perform during the Valparaiso Chamber Concert Band on Thursday, March 11. 



chance on tour,' and we finally got to go this 
year," said Doebler. "It's really been a great 
opportunity for us. The weather has been ideal, 
the crowds have been great, the students have 



played well, so the whole thing, to us, has been 
a success. Plus, it's been snowing in Indiana a 
little bit, so this makes us extra happy." 

The tour took place during Valparaiso's 



spring break. Jessie Johnson is a junior at 
Valparaiso and plays the alto saxophone in the 
band. She also agrees that the tour has been a 
success. 

"We've loved it! We've gotten to be such 
a tight group, and this has been a big tour for 
us because it was the first time we got to fly 
somewhere. It's a really good experience to 
perform for different kinds of audiences. We've 
performed for kindergartners to seniors," said 
Johnson. "We also got to go to Disneyland on 
Sunday and we went to Hollywood on Monday, 
so it's been a lot of fun." 

CLU senior Holly Halweg, who is a sopra- 
no in the CLU Choir and plays percussion in the 
CLU Symphony Orchestra, attended Thursday 
night's concert and was impressed with their 
performance. 

"You can't really compare them to our 
school's band because they are a much bigger 
school, but if you did, they are really just amaz- 
ing," said Halweg. 

The CLU Choir will perform at Valparaiso 
University during its tourof the Midwest, which 
will happen during the first week of April. 



MANNA: The Cone jo Valley f ood bankaMs those in need 



By Candice Pokk 
Special to the echo 



MANNA, a food bank that serves the 
Conjeo Valley, is a widely known charity 
in Thousand Oaks, Calif. It isn't located in 
a warehouse, but a small white house with 
blue trim. It is here that a sense of comfort is 
provided to families in need. 

The goal of MANNA is to provide food 
to anyone who needs it. MANNA serves 
5,000 families a month by providing them 
with a week's worth of groceries. All that 
is required is California state identification 
and a recommendation from a church or an 
organization. 

MANNA is a foundation that was started 
in 1971, by a woman named Mary Hume in 
an effort to gather food items for neighbors 
in need. MANNA has been kept alive since 
1971 by community members. The primary 
idea behind MANNA is that it is owned by the 
community for the community. The food bank 
receives no funding from the government and 
all of the money that is donated is put into 
MANNA. Monetary and food donations are 
made by individuals and clubs. Grocery stores 
donate food that is on the verge of expiration, 
and if MANNA can't use the food, it will find 




Photograph UJ . 
MANNA volunteer and retiree Sam Fonts- poses next to the shelves he stocks. 



an organization that will. 

With only one employee, the organiza- 
tion is operated almost completely by vol- 
unteers. Pauline Satterbro is the administrator 
for MANNA. She has been giving her time 
for 20 years. She runs the entire day to day 
operation and goes on speaking engagements 
to recruit volunteers as well as donations. She 
works closely with many churches, women's 
groups, and the National Charity League. 
Satterbro also gives tours of MANNA to 
anyone interested in seeing what MANNA is 
like firsthand. 



Dave Slater is one of seven volunteer 
board members who oversees the organiza- 
tion. Some of the things that he oversees as a 
board member are the property that MANNA 
is located on, the search for new donations 
and construction around the premises. 

Sam Forusz volunteers at MANNA and 
said he helps the program because the com- 
munity needs it. 

As with most food banks, they run into a 
shortage during summer time. During the hol- 
idays, everyone is eager to give, and MANNA 
is inundated with food. Come April and May, 



its supply starts to run low. 

"Spring through summer is when we are 
the barest [and] cereal is a luxury; it is expen- 
sive," said Satterbro. 

Volunteers stock the shelves and help 
individuals pick out food to take home to 
their families. The only requirement to vol- 
unteer at MANNA is age. Volunteers must 
be 15 years old to help stock and organize 
food and 21 to help customers lift food off 
the shelves. MANNA is always looking for 
volunteers to give as little as a few hours just 
once a month. 

"Especially youth," Slater said. "There 
is a lot of carton and box lifting that it takes 
multiple elderly men to lift when it could be 
easily done by one young person." 

California Lutheran University's 
Community Service Center has sent students 
to help on annual university service days. 
On these days, a group of students stock the 
shelves or help with maintenance around the 
facility. 

"[Volunteering] builds a little character 
to do, rather than always 'gimme, gimme, 
gimme,'" Slater said. 

Anyone interested in volunteering or 
donating food can contact Pauline Satterbro 
at (805) 497-4959. 



Don't 

forget 

to go to 

Club Lu's 

"CLW" 

at 
9 p.m. 
in Hie 



COME JOIN US! 



Have you read my 

#1 bestseller? 
Therewill be a test. 



Prince of Peace Evangelical Lutheran Church's 

Campus Ministry Team invites you to join them 

for a fellowship dinner and Bible Study. Learn 

what the Bible says about Judas on: 

Thursday, March 1 8th at 6 pm. 

A FREE chili dinner will be servecf. 

For more information please call 

(805) 492-8943 

or email clu@princeofpeace-wels.org. 
Just 5 minutes from CLU! 
Food for the body and soul - please join us! 




3415 Erbes Rd. • (605) 492-8943 
www.princeofpeace-wels.org 



®jte ^(uaa® 



The Echo 



OPINION 



March 17, 2004 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



_ The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 



A modest proposal to end stupidity 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



"Only two things are infinite, the universe 
and human stupidity, and I 'm not sure about 
the former. " 

-Albert Einstein 

Hot damn, the news last week was 
strange and fast. A woman killed one of her 
twin babies in order to avoid getting a scar, 
Vladimir Putin was re-elected in a characteris- 
tically undemocratic fashion, a fist fight broke 
out during a South Korea parliamentary debate 
and scientists are still debating over whether a 
tenth planet was discovered late last week. 

In local news, we here at The Echo 
received a letter from the U.S. State Department 
signed by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell. 
Enclosed were two pamphlets: 'Travel Tips 



for Students" and "Travel Warning on Drugs 
Abroad" 

Thank you, Mr. Powell, but what we real- 
ly wanted was an itemized expense account of 
State Department spending for the last year. 
I'm curious to know how much it costs to send 
out these pamphlets to student newspapers all 
over the country and how effective these pam- 
phlets are in deterring drug crimes. According 
to 'Travel Warning on Drugs Abroad," 2,500 
Americans are arrested in foreign countries 
each year, and one third of those arrests (about 
833) involve drug-related crimes. Yes, it seems 
the fine people at the State Department sent 
out thousands of pamphlets in order to prevent 
833 people from getting arrested while travel- 
ing abroad. 

Certainly college students should be 
made aware of the dangers of traveling with 
drugs, but wouldn't students be better served 
with "Ten Tips for Cancer Prevention"? 
Cancer kills more than 500,000 Americans 
every year, and, in many cases, establishing 
a variety of healthy habits during youth can 
reduce the possibility of getting cancer. 

In the pamphlet 'Travel Warning on 
Drugs Abroad" the State Department urges 
students to remember a variety of com- 
monsense rules including "Don't make a jail 
sentence part of your trip abroad." Writers of 



product warning labels look upon pointless, 
commonsense advice like this with pnde. 
These good people have brought Americans 
such gems as the canine shampoo bottle that 
reads "Caution: The contents of this bottle 
should not be fed to fish" and the self-defense 
pepper spray canister that warns, "May irritate 
eyes." 

The ridiculous warning label craze was 
spawned by the rise of frivolous lawsuits, 
which were kicked into overdrive in 1 994 when 
a woman from New Mexico was awarded S2.9 
million in damages after she was burned by a 
cup of hot coffee from McDonald's. Lawsuits 
of this absurd caliber raise the cost of products 
for consumers throughout the country and 
need to be stopped. 

I urge lawmakers to draft a ban on outra- 
geous acts of stupidity that result in pointless 
lawsuits. For example, the punishment for 
feeding dog shampoo to a fish should be 20 
hours of community service shampooing dogs 
at the local animal shelter. If commonsense 
punishments like this were instituted for the 
plaintiffs of frivolous lawsuits, products would 
be cheaper and Americans might come to 
learn that they are responsible for their own 
mistakes — this would be a huge step for a 
citizenry that is constantly blaming society for 
all personal misfortunes. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo, 



I wish to dispute some of the opinions contained in Nicole 
Rizkallah's guest editorial [March 10, 2004]. Educators are meant to 
enlighten their students, to open their eyes to something beyond their 
safe base. Instead of persecuting our professors for offering a different 
viewpoint, we should be thanking them for challenging our own. Those 
who are truly secure in their beliefs will welcome this opportunity, for 
only through reflection and evaluation will our beliefs be strengthened 
and solidified. This bubble of non-reality that you speak of exists in a 
college that bans these opposing viewpoints from being voiced. If you 
wish to break this bubble, then you are welcoming the tapestry of opin- 
ions that exist in the real world, several of which are represented by your 
"anti-American" professors. 

Denying someone's freedom of speech — which, do not forget, 
is a privilege for you as well — is anti-American. Trying to stop the 
progressive desire to improve our nation is anti- American. Closing your 
ears and mind to an opinion different than your own and labeling it as 
anti- American because it is so is ignorant and cowardly. Politics touches 
all aspects of life. Trying to force it out of a college classroom will truly 
make this campus a bubble of non-reality. Valid education involves 
grappling: exploring new ideas, challenging old ideas and forming new 
ones. This is accomplished through an active dialogue between teacher 
and student. If you feel you are unable to address opposing opinions 
within the parameters of your classroom, then perhaps you should find 
a way to express your views as opposed to taking away theirs. 

Kelly Murkey, senior, liberal arts 



Dear Echo, 

I am writing in response to Nicole Rizkallah's guest editorial. New to campus 
this fall, I have several reactions to her piece. First, I agree that it is important for 
professors to remember that it is not our job to indoctrinate our students with our 
personal beliefs. I believe that we should strive to promote critical thinking about 
important social issues, like U.S. foreign policy. In my opinion, it is best to try and 
present both sides of an issue when in a classroom. That said, I also believe that it 
is legitimate for a professor to express a personal opinion in a classroom; it may 
be more fair for students to know a professor's bias so that they can take that into 
account when evaluating information presented in class. 

However, it can seriously harm the classroom learning experience if these 
expressions of personal beliefs/opinions are presented by a professor as fact or in a 
context where students do not have the time or comfort to express dissenting opin- 
ions. I take issue with Ms. Rizkallah's argument that to be against the war in Iraq or 
against President Bush's foreign policies is to be anti-American. She. herself, makes 
the point that a key American value is freedom of speech. It is '^ro- American'' to 
exercise this right to speak against the actions of our government Again, this free- 
dom of speech does come with particular responsibilities when one is in a position 
of power in a classroom. 

I am also dismayed to read another complaint about the percepbon that there is 
a "liberal" bias in academia and that this bias degrades/detracts from students' edu- 
cational experiences. I know liberal and conservative professors who stnve to create 
classroom atmospheres in which students explore issues from multiple vantage 
points and are respected for constructing thoughtful and well-supported arguments 
for or against a particular issue. These very same professors may, at times, make their 
own views clear but do not express them as dogma. 

I hope that, as a community, professors and students at CLU carfwork together 
to communicate in productive ways about how to improve classroom experiences 
such that there is less name-calling from either "liberals" or "conservatives" and more 
productive discussions about the social and political issues that shape our lives. 

Adina Nack, Assistant Professor of Sociology 



gjggr ffiOIftf® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks. CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465: 
Fax (805) 493-3327: E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



March 17, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Baseball continues hot streak 





Pholograph by Kyle Pelerson 
Safe at second! CLU crushed Rutgers University. 9-1. on Friday. March 12. 

The Kingsmen took on Vanguard 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
Junior Jon Caimes winds up for a pilch. Cables won 
his third game of the year against Rutgers. 



The California Lutheran University base- 
ball team continued its winning streak this week, 
as it crushed the competition on Wednesday, 
March 10 and Friday, March 12. 



University on Wednesday, March 10. "Rie 
Kingsmen capitalized on five of Vanguard's 
errors, which allowed them to win the game, 
7-3. 

Junior Roy Riley had three hits, an RBI and 
scored a run. Senior Geoff Buchanan stole a pair 



of bases. Sophomore pitcher Matt Hirsh won the 
game for the Kingsmen. He gave up only three 
runs and six hits in 6.2 innings. 

"We came ready to play on Wednesday. It 
felt good to get revenge on Vanguard, because 
they beat us last year. Our defense played well 
and so did the offense; that's what helped us 
win," Hirsh said 

The Kingsmen had an easy game against 
Rutgers-Newark, crushing them 9-1, The 
Kingsmen scored all the runs they needed in the 
second inning. 

"We just played really well; Doug Camett 
did a great job coming in during the eighth 
inning. He was able to prevent any tuns. We 
are so used to winning, and we plan on keep- 
ing it that way," said junior Jon Caimes. 

Riley was two-for-four with a two- 
run home run. Sophomore Christian Hariot 
and junior Jeremy Koening each had two hits. 
Caimes pitched and brought in his third win 
of the season. He scattered five hits in seven 
innings. 

"We just need to keep doing what we are 
doing. I mean if it's not broke, why fix it? We 
hope to keep doing what we are doing, espe- 
cially when we take on Cal State Hayward this 
weekend," said senior Ryan Hostetler. 



Regals Softball wins seven in a row 



By Arif Hasan 
Staff Writer 



The Regals Softball team took the season 
series away from the Whittier Poets this week, 
defeating them on Friday, March 12. 6-2, and 
again on Saturday, March 13, in a double- 
header winning the first game in the ninth 
inning 4-2 and the second game 4-0. 

"Taking this series was great for us 
because now we can focus on the rest of the 
conference teams," said sophomore pitcher 
Gianna Regal. 

Regal was the starting pitcher for the 
Regals in game one of Saturday's double- 
header. Regal got through four innings and 
gave up one run. 

Game two of Saturday's double header 
was led by sophomore pitcher Olivia Chacon, 
who pitched a complete game shutout, pick- 
ing up her fifth win of the season. Chacon also 
contributed with a two-run double in the fifth 




Sophomore Olivia Chacon releases the pitch lo t 
inning. 

"I think we all wanted to get the sweep 
over Whittier, so in game two, we played 
harder than in game one," Chacon said. 

In Friday's game against the Poets, 
Chacon pitched six innings to help, the 
Regals take game one of the season series. 



Photograph byDan Norton 

bailer Chacon started against the University of Texas. 

On Wednesday, the Regals had another 

double-header, but with a nonconfer- 

ence opponent, the University of Texas at 

Dallas. 

The Regals won both games 3-2 and 
6-5. 

Chacon started for the Regals in game 



one, giving up two runs. With the game in 
extra innings, senior Emily Otineru hit a two- 
run triple, tying the game in the seventh. 

"After that, I knew we were going to 
comeback." said freshman Ashley Calendo. 

In the ninth inning, senior Shannon 
Teverbaugh drove in the game-winning 
run to capture game one of the double- 
header. 

In game two. Regal took the stage 
for the Regals, contributing big plays on 
the defensive and offensive side. 

Regal relieved freshman Danielle 
Everson in the third by striking out two 
batters. Then in the seventh inning, the 
Regals scored four runs and Regal drove 
in the game winner. 

The Regals softball team has won 
seven straight and improved its record 
to 8-10, 5-5 conference. The Regals 
will face Cal Bapist away on Thursday, 
March 18, in another double-header. 



Water polo improves as the season goes on 



"It was so exciting to 
win our first game of the 
season and in CLU 
history." 

Kayla Schrock 
Freshman 

By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University's 
women's water polo team had a tough week- 
end but eventually came out triumphant with 



its first win. 

The Regals first took on Notre Dame 
on Saturday, March 13. They fought hard but 
were crushed by Notre Dame, losing to them 
4-14. They next took on Chapman University 
and again lost 5-15. 

"We did well against these teams, I mean 
we really didn't come excepting anything, we 
just took each game at a time," said freshman 
Mackenzie Faumuina. 

The Regals then took on Sonoma State 
on Sunday, March 14. It was a close match, 
but the Regals could not pull through; they 
lost 7-9. 

Later that day, the team took on 
Macalister. Warmed up and ready for their last 



match, the team came out strong and crushed 
Macalister 9-0. 

"We are so excited; we completely shut 
them out. It was so exciting to win our first 
game of the season and in CLU history," said 
freshmen Kayla Schrock. 

Schrock blocked seven goals during the 
game against Macalister. Freshmen Danielle 
Rios led the team in scoring with five goals. 
Freshmen Jen Danielson and Faumuina each 
had two goals. Freshman Michelle Hernandez 
added six steals. 

"We really improved over the weekend," 
said freshman Scarlett Williams. "I think that 
we came out to play and we did awesome, it 
was the best we have ever played." 




Photograph by Bell Lopez 
Freshman goalie Kayla Schrock saves the point 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 17, 2004 



Regals tennis beats No. 12 in nation 




By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Stephanie Shaker 
Senior Rebecca Hunau returns the volley. Hunan and 
her doubles partner defeated Occidental on March 12 



The California Lutheran University 
Regals hosted the Washington University 
Bears on Monday, March 8. The Regals, who 
are currently ranked No. 18 in the nation, sur- 
prised the No. 12 Bears by beating them 5-4. 

Beginning with a solid sweep in the 
doubles, the Regals put the first three points of 
their win on the board. 

No. 1 doubles senior Rebecca Hunau and 
partner junior Jen Hansen defeated theNo.13 
doubles team in the nation. Rathi Mani and 
Laura Zwick 9-8. No. 2 doubles junior Lisa 
Novajosky and sophomore Blair Murphy 
defeated Laura Greenberg and Erin Fleming 
8-5, and No. 3 doubles senior Stephanie 
Perkins and freshman Brianna Smalling 
defeated Kacie Cook and Becky Rovner 8-6. 

With three points on the board, all the 
Regals needed were an extra two points to 
assure the win, and that came when No.l 
singles Hansen defeated Cook 6-0, 6-2 
and also when Novajosky defeated Zwick 
6-3, 6-4. 



Young golfers struggle on green 




Freshman Tyler Doyle chips the ball onto the green 

By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen golf team lost at home 
to the University of Redlands Bulldogs, 
298-289, to move to 3-4 overall and 1-4 
in the SCIAC. 

Junior Jason Poyser finished the 
par-71 course at Sterling Hills with a 72. 
Senior Jordan Silvertrust shot a 74, sopho- 
more Peder Nyhus finished 4-up, freshman 
Tyler Doyle finished with a 76, freshman 
Christian Colunga shot a 77 and sopho- 
more Nick Vemer finished with an 84. 

"We played well," Doyle said. "It was 
our lowest team score on the course. Jason 
Poyser played very well and he kept our 
team score low." 

"We shot our best score of the year, 
but Redlands is ranked No. 3 in the nation 
so they barely beat us," said sophomore 
Austin Aker. "Coach Lindgren did a great 
job preparing us for the tournament. He's 
been doing a great job coaching us all year. 
Our team was ready to play well; we finally 
played to our capabilities. Hopefully we'll 
play well in our future tournaments." 

"We already dug ourselves a hole," 
Doyle said. "We're gonna end up with a 



Photograph by Kyle Laubach 
in hopes of a landing in a good putting position. 
losing record in the SCIAC, which hasn't 
happened under the reign of Jeff Lindgren. 
Our conference has gotten better in the last 
few years. Our average this year is a lot 
lower than it was a few years ago. 

"I have high expectations for this team 
in the future years; there's a lot of young 
talent on this team," he continued. "We can 
only get better. Redlands has two seniors, 
two juniors and two sophomores. Age and 
experience carry a lot of weight, especially 
in an intellectual sport like golf." 

"We finally had a good day to play 
golf yesterday. All our other tournaments 
were in the rain or in the Santa Ana 
winds," Aker said. 

"I think we're looking forward to that 
and playing against SCIAC teams and see- 
ing how we fare and trying to avenge the 
losses we took this season," said sopho- 
more Michael Corso. "The team seems to 
be coming together. This year we seem a 
lot more focused. We have definitely clear- 
ly defined goals for what we want to do." 

The Kingsmen will compete in the 
two-day Huntingdon Invitational on March 
15 and March 16. 



"I knew that I had to step it up to help 
my team and I am happy that we beat a team 
ranked higher than us," Hansen said. 

Also on the agenda in this last week for 
the Regals was a SCIAC match against the 
Occidental College Tigers on Friday, March 
12. This match was played at Occidental and 
was victorious for the Regals, with a score of 
7-2. The Regals again dominated doubles to 
bring the first three points to their favor. 

The singles matches that gave the Regals 
the additional four points would be No. 2 sin- 
gles Novajosky defeating Lori Judd 6-2, '6-2; 
No. 4 singles Smalling defeating Eliza Bums 
6-1,6-0; No. 5 singles sophomore Aimee Fiore 
defeating Amanda Iseri 3-6, 6-2, 7-5; and No. 
6 singles freshman Karen Zimmerman defeat- 
ing Natalie Noto 6-3, 6-4. 

"I thought that this team didn't have any 
weapons to beat us that day, even though we 
lost two matches," said Smalling about their 
win against the Tigers. 

Nancy Garrison, head coach for the 
Regals, expected to do well this week and 
everything went in favor of the Regals. 

"This was a huge week for us. We beat 



the No. 12 ranked team in the nation and then 
we won another SCIAC match. We are play- 
ing very competitively," Garrison said. 




Photograph by Stephanie Shaker 
Junior Jen Hansen focuses on returning ihe ball. Han- 
sen was one of two singles to win against Washington. 



Tennis wins despite slow start 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Dan Norton 
Two California Lutheran University tennis players are enjoying playing tennis on a sunny day. 

Wu 6-1, 7-5; No. 2 singles Vallejos defeating 
Mark Plowman 6-0, 6-0; No. 3 singles sopho- 
more Shara Surabi defeating Brad Grace 6-4, 
6- 1 ; and No. 4 singles Hasebe defeating Roy 
Lehman 6-2, 6-4, 

"Coach gave us a reality check after los- 
ing doubles, and then we just wanted to fight 
out there and give it all we had. After all, if 
we would have lost to this team, we would 
have been out of the top 25 national ranking 
and would have had a tough time getting in to 
nationals," Vallejos said. 

The Hardin-Simmons Cowboys are cur- 
rently ranked No. 9 in the West region and are 
not ranked in the top 25 nationally, compared 
to the Kingsmen, who are ranked No. 12 in the 
national standings. 

"It was an inspired performance. We 
completely doubled up on our work ethic 
over the last couple of weeks, and it showed 
today at the courts," said Head Coach Mike 
Gennette. 

The next adversary on the Kingsmen 's 
list is Whitman College from Washington, 
who will be playing the Kingsmen on 
Tuesday, March 16, at CLU starting at 2 
p.m. 



On Friday, March 12, the California 
Lutheran University Kingsmen met the Hardin- 
Simmons Cowboys to encounter another tough 
battle in the western section of the Division III 
NCAA men's tennis race to the top. 

The match started favorably for the 
Cowboys when they won two out of the three 
doubles to get the first point on the board. The 
only match that was won in doubles was the 
team of junior J.V. Vallejos and sophomore 
Karlo Arapovic. 

"I really don't know what happened. 
We just started out really slow and the next 
thing you know, we had lost a very important 
doubles point," said junior co-captain Quinn 
Caldaron. 

Caldaron lost his doubles match with 
partner senior co-captain Junya Hasebe but 
won his singles match easily in two sets. 

After the doubles, the Kingsmen took part 
in a quick comeback to get four points on the 
board and win the match with a score of 4-3. 

The points were given to the team by No. 
1 singles Caldaron defeating opponent David 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn S2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamn.com 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 20 


6o West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


March 24, 2004 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Water polo wins second game. 


"The Passion of the Christ" review. 


Resolution to improve campus 
lighting passed by Senate. 


See story page 8 


See story page 5 


See story page 3 



Club Lu holds Friday Night Mayhem 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



On Friday, March 19, California 
Lutheran University held its third annual 
"CLW Friday Night Mayhem" for Club Lu. 
The event was held in the gym, and the first 
100 students to arrive got a free California 
Lutheran Wrestling T-shirt and Red Bull. 

CLW was sponsored by the ASCLU 
Programs Board. The show is based on the 
professional wrestling seen on television. 

Current CLU students spend months 
planning, choreographing and practicing 
the fights to make them look as real as pos- 
sible. Programs Board brings in an outside 
company to set up a real wrestling ring for 
the students to use for the show. 

A crowd of approximately 600 students 
turned out for the event. CLW is one of the 
more popular Club Lu's on campus, gener- 
ating more and more of a turn-out each year. 
Over the past three years, the stories behind 
these wrestlers have developed into rivalries 
known campus-wide. 

"Joe [Henle] riding in on the [motor- 
cycle] was killer! And I'm always a fan of 
Dirty Mama," junior Ryan Lisk said. 

This year, Brendan "Kntter" Kinion 
played the part of the commissioner, a tide 
he won from "The Fox" (Jimmy Fox) in 
last year's show. Many of the old wrestlers 
came back to fight for their titles, like the 
duo of 'Too Damn Sexy" (Sean Porter and 
Brent Baier) fighting "The Big Guns" (Ryan 
Tukua and Beau Kimbrel) and "Los Locos" 
(Alex Espinoza and Alex Gonzalez). In 
addition, "Kid Kaos" (Chad Brown) fought 
"The Fox" for the heavyweight champion- 
ship belt and won. 

There were a few new faces in the ring 
this year, including "Peaches" (Stephanie 
Nelson), who teamed up with Commissioner 
Kritter to fight the well-known duo of "Dirty 
Mama" (Pam Clark) and "White Trash" 
(Jeremy Soiland). 

CLW announcer Brian Roberts also 
got into the ring in a match where Roberts 
tried to prove that he belonged in the 
show. Roberts challenged any member 
of the audience to fight him. Senior Ken 
Westphalen, who is significantly larger than 
Roberts, accepted the challenge. The set up 
of such opposite-sized opponents made for 
an entertaining fight. It took Roberts three 
tries, in addition to some skilled dodging 
and a little trickery, but he was able to defeat 
Westphalen. 

"The best part was the emergence of 
Brian Roberts as the star of the show," Fox 
said. 

Fox, who came up with the idea for 
CLW three years ago, headed up the com- 
mittee that put on the event. He has been in 
charge of recreating the show every year. 

"Overall, I think the show went well, as 




the 



far as the matches 
and the script going 
according to plan. 
But I felt like the 
audience was a little 
tired before we even 
started," Fox said. 

CLW is a pro- 
gram students look 
forward to each 
year. Its appeal may 
lie in the realism of 
the matches as well 
as how much the 
audience is allowed 
to participate. 

Posters support 
some wrestlers and 
tear down others. 

They are passed out /n a fight that spilled over and out of the ring, "Wesley" body slams "Damien" as 
to students as they crowd looks on, 
come in the door, 
giving the audience 
characters that they can cheer 
on or characters they can hate. 

"I think my favorite part 

of the night was the crowd in 

general. They make the show 

for us with their chants and 

reactions. We appreciate the 

effort they put forth. Overall, I 

was very pleased with what we 

put out. Even though we had 

problems at the start, the drama 

department and media services 

did a fabulous job. And when 

the students stay around and 

congratulate you afterward, 

, . Announcer Brian Roberts surprises Referee Prentice Reedy enters the ring 

you know you just put on a , . „ r . . ~ , , r ... . , • 

j u >>n v._» -j everyone as he challenges any member shirtless before suiting up and begm- 

goodshow, Roberts said. ,-■,. - , ., 

of the audience to a fight. mng the event. 





"Tyler "The Superdude' Styles" flees the ring. Meanwhile, 
"Jay Smooth" fights "Christopher St. James" in the back- 
ground. 



"Jay Smooth" is escorted into the gym prior to 
his match. 

At! photographs by Dan Norton 



SIjiis ^oih® 



The Echo 



Calendar 



MARCH 24, 2004 




today 

march 24 



ASCLU General Elections 

SUB 

Starts at 9 a.m. 

CSC Blond Drive 
SUB 

Starts at 9 a.m. 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Rotaracl Meeting 
Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 



a sneak peek of this week at the III 



thursday 

march 25 





Support Group for Eating Disorder 
Recoverers 

F-Building 
6 p.m. 

Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 



Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Club LU: Singled Out 

Pavilion 

9 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 
Gym 

9 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 

friday 

march 26 



Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 



lira 



Saturday 

march 27 





Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 



Sunday 

march 28 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Field 
10 a.m. 




o 




Mainstage 2 - Isabella Met a Fella and 
Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark 

Preus Brandt Forum 
2 p.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6: 15 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
9 p.m. 



monday fT : 

march 29 






« 



ASCLV-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 



ASCLU -G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLV-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I 
8:30 p.m. 



we love you love jflLwys yoon roomies. Evy, URiff s- mNW 



.^f Have something special to say to one or wore of Class 2Q04? 
j >^tefc Then say it in the ECHO'S... 

/c^ GRADUATION ISSUE: 

l('\oii want lo send a graduation shotil oul or special message lo someone in lite graduating 

class of 2004. 1 hen let us know! 

The following are your 3 options for submitting your message to a 2004 grad: 

I) Email il lo: echo@clunel.edu with the subject line: "Graduation Issue" or 2) via inlet-campus 

mail to: Box 3650 or 3) drop il off® the ECHO office. 

Texl onlj messages: $15 Add a picture for: S5 

(Emailed pictures need to be scanned @ 300 dpi) 

Messoges and payment must be received no later than April 26th. If any questions, comact Amanda or Roy at (SOS) 493-3865. 




classifieds 



Weekend Job Opportunity: Great weekend 
job! SlO/hr. Need enlhusiasm to hold sign to 
direct buyers to new home Must have trans- 
porialton. Hiring immediately for Agoura Hills. 

If intercsted.call: 
(800) 343-8368 

Tutors Needed: $15-$18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one. in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academte subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required. Mail, fax. or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SATI/N.GRE. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to:. 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suilc PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: {310)282-6424 

or email resume to: 

instructorhiring6@acecducation.com 

Classified ads can be placed 
on trie Calendar page for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and clarity. 
Call: 

(so?) 495-5S65 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 1 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800- $3500+ forthesum 
mer working with children outdoors ! 

Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 



Where are YOU going? 

Come find out more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 or x3750 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon - Thur., 12 to 7 p.m. 



Student AIudm Association 



Tuesday, Mai'Cft 30, 200* 
4S. ? 7v30 V M~ NVgr&i r> 2 



Cdrcf Giveaway 



_* 






-p-ee pizza & 
* Drinks -ft*""" 

QOfnft la**!*. PlOr^ pbCUt t"5*r pew) 



Asian Club and 
Friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and FRIENDS 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 

Satoshi Mitsumori, president 

(8 JH) 590-7625 



BSU: BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 



Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at 5:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, & FELLOWSHIP!!! 

Everyone is WELCOME ! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Pryor Hall 

(805J 493-3951 

BSU Adviser 



Sta jKfljH© 



March 24, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Changes to improve 04-'05 elections 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



A revision of California Lutheran 
University's Constitution and structural 
changes to the student body government have 
created stifTer competition and perhaps a more 
effective government for those running in the 
ASCLU general elections. The elections will 
take place in the SUB on Tuesday, March 30, 
and Wednesday, March 3 1 . 

"It's going to be exciting next year for 
those who are involved in ASCLU," said cur- 
rent ASCLU President Robert Boland. "It's 
exactly what we wanted." 

Although there were several important 
changes to the CLU's Constitution, two 
amendments will significantly impact the 
upcoming elections and next year's govern- 
ing body. 

First, the structure of ASCLU-G will 
now consist of two boards instead of three: 
Senate and Programs Board. The Residence 
Hall Association was disbanded and its duties 
were absorbed into the other boards. This has 
effectively reduced the number of available 



board positions from 60 to 40, which translates 
to an increased level of competition. 

"There were some internal problems with 
RHA board," Boland said. "So the student 
body voted to eliminate it in the recent elec- 
tion. This is a tremendous change and has 
made the competition stiffer." 

"With a smaller government comes 
more competition," said President-elect Jason 
Soyster. "Because there are a third fewer posi- 
tions, qualified people will now be making it 
to the boards." 

"It's going to be exciting 
next year for those who 
are involved in ASCLU." 



Robert Boland 
ASCLU President 

Second, Senate will now consist of four 
senators from each class, and Programs Board 



will have four representatives from each class. 
Senate and Programs Board will each have 
a commuter senator/representative, as well. 
Perhaps most significant to this amendment is 
that now each member can vote across class 
lines. 

"Previously with each board, you could 
only vote for your respective class. Now 
everyone will vote for everything. This signif- 
icantly changes the dynamic of campaigning 
because you now have to campaign to every- 
one," Senate Director-elect Sarah Gray said. 

"The process will be more difficult, but 
worthwhile," Soyster said. "It will no longer 
be class specific. Members will now represent 
everyone and will have to campaign as such 
and work for the entire student body regard- 
less of class." 

Another contributing factor for the 
increased participation in ASCLU could be 
attributed to the higher visibility of its mem- 
bers this year. 

"Perhaps because the competition 
changed, ASCLU got a lot of publicity But 
Club Lu was very well attended and well pub- 



ing computers in the SUB and study lounges 
were placed in Peterson and Thompson," Gray 
said. "These big things make people want to 
be a part of something good, loo." 

"ASCLU has had some very focal lead- 
ers this year. This might explain why so many 
students have become interested as compared 
to years past," Boland said. 

"As of [Wednesday, March 17], there 
were more than 40 people signed up to run," 
Soyster said. "Of those, 1 2 students signed up 
to run for the four available Senior Programs 
Board positions and seven students signed up 
to run for the four Senior Senate spots. We 
want as many as possible, it seems, to bring 
out the best people." 

"I think we made the right decision. The 
revision of the constitution and the overall 
changes to the student government means that 
ASCLU-G is now more representative of the 
student body," Gray said. 

Students interested in learning more about 
the 2004-2005 ASCLU Senate and Programs 
Board elections/positions should contact 
Soyster at x3462 or the SUB Information 



licized. and the Senate did big things like plac- Desk at x3302. 



Senate passes new lighting resolution 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Senate passed a resolution that would 
improve lighting conditions in various areas 
of the California Lutheran University cam- 
pus during last week's meeting. 

The lighting bill was sponsored by 
Freshman Senator Bethany Bengston as 
part of the Outdoor Structural committee. 
The committee has been working on the 
resolution for most of die spring semester. 

Many in Senate felt that the lack of 
proper lighting on campus was a serious 
safety concern. 

The proposed lighting changes for Buth 
Park would allow for tall overhead lights to 
be installed so that there is more light for 
those students and faculty members return- 
ing to their cars after a night class or evening 
event. 



"I think it's a good idea. People will 
naturally feel safer walking to their cars late 
at night if the area is well-lit," junior Tony 
Chiaramonte said. 

At a recent Senate meeting, the issue 
of better lighting for the university houses 
was brought up. Included in the new bill is 
a clause that more lighting- will be added to 
each university-owned house. 

Lighting will also be unproved in the 
New West hall rear parking lot. This js the 
area parallel to Olsen Road. 

"1 think better lighting is a start to better 
security. 1 diink it'll help people feel safer as 
well as deter thieves from possibly breaking 
into more cars," sophomore and New West 
resident Alicia Jordan said. 

Jordan was one of the students whose 
car was burglarized earlier this semester 
while it was parked in the New West park- 
ing lot. 

The bill also calls for better lighting in 



the Thompson Hall parking lot, on the cor- 
ner of Mt. Clef Drive and Faculty Drive. 

"I don't think that I'll necessarily feel 
safer now that there are going to be more 
lights in the Thompson parking lot. I don't 
think light necessarily equals a safer cam- 
pus. Perhaps more security would be bet- 
ter, or a class in self-defense," sophomore 



Katrina Wong said. 

Senate also proposed better lighting 
along Memorial Parkway near the stadium, 
saying that when it is dark in that area it is 
not safe for students or anyone else walking 
in the vicinity. 

The lighting bill is now being passed 
on to CLU administration for approval and 
ftinding. 



Excitement. Adventure. 
Surprise. Thrills. ..^_ 

This ain't your parents travel agency ...ffl 




ISSY's 

OlMPUTER 
TIPS 




Paris $467 Madrid. ..$602 

London. ...$426 Fiji $765 

i-mmnii 

5 night accomm. 

$454 LP/ CflBO/ 



4 night accomm. 

„„.. .,.„., From: 

™ $464 



Shortcuts to PowerPoint 
Success 

Navigating through PowerPoint 
files is easier and smoother if you 
know the shortcuts. Commit the 
following keystrokes to memory 
and be the star of your next pre- 
sentation. 

1. To invoke the Slide show 
mode, choose the F5 key. 

2. To Advance to the next 
slide, choose one of the following 
options: Enter, Page Down, right 
arrow key, down arrow key, space 



bar, or click the mouse. 

3. To Return to the previous 
slide, choose one of the following 
options: Page Up, left arrow key, 
up arrow key, or backspace. 

4. To End Slide Show, choose 
either the Esc key or hyphen. 

5. To Go to the slide <num- 
ber>, press <number> + Enter. 

6. To Display a black screen 
or return to the slide show from a 
black screen, choose b or period. 

7. To Display a white screen 
or return to the slide show from 
a white screen, choose w or 
comma. 

8. To Hide the pointer, press 
CTRL+h. 

9. To Redisplay hidden pointer, 
press CRTL + a. 

If you have any questions 
regarding short cut keys with 
PowerPoint, contact the Help Desk 
at x3698 or help(a>,clunet.edu. 



Single? Dating Online? 



One stop. No hassles. 




BBI ^TRAVEL 


l 


[ www.statravel.com 


) 


(323) 934.6722 (818) 882.4692" 

STUDENT TRAVEL & BEYONC 





f-i 



'A 



Get the Best Dates and find the person you Deserve with the Right Photo! 

It's Easy! We'll replace your eustrig Onire Photo with a Professional Porta* that *Fr** £ 

will Guarantee your Pcture will go from Meek to Sleek! If you dont have a picture yel, JL£ f 

call us tor your new Ontrie Portral First mpressions are everything! A Pcture is worth a 1000 words! 

Package include*: 

• Halt Hour Portrait Session • 20-25 Online Photo prools 

• 2 final Photos lormalled & lelouched tor your online service emailed lo you 

• Free Custom 8 x 10* • Available in Color and Black & While ONLY $125 Reg. $299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

find a date on the Web, you better have a realty good picture "-The New York Times 

HEADSHOT HIGHWAY 

Portraits for Online Dating ... 



Ege 



®Jt5E ^Oljfffi 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



March 24, 2004 



What do you think about gay marriage? 



fa 






John Cummings, sociology, 2005 



Ashley Bosiacki, criminal justice, 2007 



Jon Vevia, music, 2006 



Daniel Gomez, undecided, 2007 



"Homosexuals should be able to have the "People are entitled to do whatever they "I don't personallyagree with homosex- "I think it's wrong. Totally against the 

same rights and responsibilities in marriage want. Government should have no say over uality, but I also don't agree with everyone's Bible's teachings." 
that heterosexuals do." any type of marriage at all." negativity towards gay marriage." 




Andy Treloar, undecided, 2007 




Megan Jeffery, communication, 2006 



Blanca Cortez, criminal justice, 2006 



Lauren Powell, liberal studies, 2004 



"I'm all for it if it makes them happy. I "I think it should be legally recognized "Religiously.Iwastaughtitwas immoral, "If two people are in love, regardless 

don't think it is up to us what other people do and receive the same benefits that regular but personally I don't see why two people that of their sexual preference, they should be 
with their lives." couples get." love each other can't legally join together." allowed to get married." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Claire Hillard. 



Car of the Week Tips for man aging stress 

By Fanma Nojoumi 
Staff Writer 




We can all relate to feeling stressed in our lives, and for college students, the stress can be over- 
whelming. Some people define stress as being associated with events or situations, and others view 
stress as the response to these situations. Whether you are stressed over finals or applying for graduate 
schools, these following tips will help you to manage the stress in your life: 

1 . Get up 1 5 minutes earlier. 
Set appointments ahead. 

3. Say "no" more often. 

4. Smile. 

5. Schedule play time into every day. 

6. Strive for excellence, not perfection. 
Ask someone to be your "vent-partner." 
Always have a plan "B." 
Exercise every day. 

10. Leave work early (with permission). 



Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson 

Senior Mike Greenhill stands next to his 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air. The 
car drives with its built 350, over drive transmission andposi trac 
rear-end. Some of the many modifications include disk brakes and dual 
Flowmasters with true 3 inch pipes. Mike loves driving it every day 
and says a blower is on the way. 



Think your car could 

be named 

"Car of the Week"? 

Call Kyle at x2791 



*A 'BeautifuC Look 

Full-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805)492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

4 1 1 E. Avenue de Los Arboles in Thousand Oaks 
Near Rue Aid and Whole Foods 



March 24, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



"Passion" shows a passionate Christ in brutal detail 



By Devon Bostock 
News Editor 



As a Christian and a film buff, I was 
eager to see "The Passion of the Christ." I 
had heard so much about it, good and bad, 
though nothing in between. No matter what, 
I assumed it would be moving. 

On a film-making level, it was quite 
good. The cinematography was excellent. 
The editing was good. Mel Gibson's use 
of symbolism was uncanny. He was able to 
take the event and bring it to- life. 

The problem was that the film focused 
only on the event, the torture and crucifixion 
of Jesus. For those who have little to no 
knowledge of the Bible, the film will be 
nothing more than a knock-off of the "Texas 
Chainsaw Massacre." Jesus, aside from 
glimpses shown in flashback, was never 
developed as a character. This was simply 
about the last 12 hours of his life, nothing 
more. He was surrounded by human emo- 
tions, with no explanation as to why these 
people either hated or loved him. To those 
of us who know already, like myself, it was 
obvious; but the fact that an unstudied non- 
believer could see the film and still have no 
understanding of the sacrifice that we believe 
Jesus made meant that the film was more of 
an inside joke for those who already believe. 

Drama 

department to 
bring one-act 
plays to CLU 

By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 

California Lutheran University is the 
proud host of the spring season for the drama 
department. Two original one-act musicals 
have been put together and will be performed 
this month. The two productions this month 
are "Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark" and 
"Isabella Met a Fella." 

"Hamlet, Disco Dane of Denmark," 
written and directed by Kenneth Gardner, 
is set in the year 1976. It tells the story of 
Prince Hamlet, who returns home to find that 
his father, who is king of the disco nightlife, 
has been murdered. As Hamlet searches for 
the person who killed his father, he must rule 
over New York's disco nightlife. What might 
be the most interesting feature of the play is 
that Shakespearean verses will be set to a 
disco beat. 

"Isabella Met a Fella," is written and 
directed by Kevin P. Kern. The story is a 
classic girl meets boy, girl loses boy tale, 
combined with rock and roll. 

The middle of April will bring to CLU 
another original one-act play, "Dancing in 
Hell," written by George Bernard Shaw and 
directed by James Carey. The play is a sexy 
tango and salsa reworking of the classic play. 
This feature will be hitting the main stage 
April 22 through April 30 and May 1 through 
May 2. 

All of the plays will be in Preus Brandt 
Forum at 8 p.m. General admission is $8 and 
admission is free with a student ID. 



Visit the Echo 

online at 

www.clunet.edu/ 

echo 



Then there is the problem that most modem 
Christian denominations base their faith on 
an understanding of what transpired, but 
primarily on the ascension, not the pain that 
Christ endured. I can see, however, that the 
film would be quite valuable to Catholics, 
like Gibson, whose faith tends to come out 
of the understanding of suffering and pun- 
ishment, sin and confession. 

To further the problem, the film is 
regarded by some to be anti-Semitic. Now 
I am no religious scholar, but I have studied 
religion, and I saw no evidence of anti- 
Semitism in the film. I felt that Gibson's 
addition of Satan into the storyline did more 
than enough to clear him of that accusation, 
and as Billy Graham said, "It is our sins that 
caused his death, not any particular group." 

All of this being said, it is easy to see 
why so many people are coming out against 
the film, including a host of movie critics. It 
is a venture based on faith that few people 
have. In the same way that it uplifts some, it 
alienates others, not to mention the fact that 
it is extraordinarily graphic in its depiction 
of Christ's suffering. 

Even so, I felt the level of violence 
was appropriate, though the level of graphic 
detail did go over-board from time to time. 
I felt that the slow motion shots of Christ's 
flesh being ripped out by a cat-o'-nine-taMs 



were too much. I was approached with the 
theory that most people don't understand 
how the weapon works. Unfortunately, this 
argument doesn't apply because Gibson 
included a scene before the whipping where 
a soldier used the weapon to hit a table, 
showing that even when it hit wood, the 
tails did a significant amount of damage. 
It is my feeling that after showing how the 
weapon worked, most people only needed to 
see Christ being whipped with it to get the 
point. The slow-motion flesh shots failed to 
drive the point home because it was already 
there. 

The movie was filled with moments 
like this when the level of goriness could 
have been reined in. Yet even with the 
amount of publicity the film and its level of 
brutality have received, people still flocked 
to the theater two weeks after its release. I 
was in a theater with more than 100 other 
people, many of whom had taken small chil- 
dren. That is where my criticism turns from 
the film to the people watching it. 

As the film progressed and the violence 
heightened, many children in the audience 
began to cry. Why? Perhaps because this 
film is so intense that it was causing actual 
trauma. Children, especially very young 
ones, do not have the capacity to understand 
concepts like death and sacrifice, two things 



that the story of Christ abounds in. They 
also do not have the attention span to read 
subtitles for two hours. These children had 
no idea why this man on screen was being 
tortured; just that he was and it was scary. 
Mel Gibson won't even allow his own chil- 
dren to watch the movie. Why? Because it is 
not for children. 

What sickens me the most is that I saw 
news broadcasts with priests and pastors rec- 
ommending that people take their children to 
see the film. People, this is ignorance at its 
worst. Fortunately, as college students, many 
of you don't have to worry about children 
of your own, but be wary when it comes to 
younger siblings. This film is something to 
be taken very seriously and should only be 
watched by those capable of doing so. 

However, I do think the film is worth- 
while. This is why I do not cover the tradi- 
tional aspects of a review. They are mean- 
ingless here. This film is all about context. I 
think that there are many people who stand to 
benefit from it. But it must be taken as what 
it is. It is a graphic story of pain and death. It 
is a vivid depiction of part of the Bible story 
that many of us grew up reading. 

The point is: go see the movie. Be 
prepared, but don't necessarily expect to 
be changed. And for His sake, don't take 
any kids. 



Comic and television artists to speak today 



By Tina Sterling 
Staff Writer 



As part of the third annual Interactive 
Arts festival, California Lutheran University 
will be hosting artist Nathan Cabrera and 
television producer Dan Clark in a talk about 
their previous and present work. It will be held 
Wednesday, March 24, at 4 p.m. in the Kwan 
Fong Gallery of Art and Culture in the Soiland 
Humanities building. 

Cabrera began his career straight out of 
high school by producing books for Image 
Comics, Marvel, DC and others. He now 
has an extensive resume in the comic book 
industry. Cabrera is also a professional in the 
toy industry; he has done work for Hasbro and 
Mattel and also is the lead designer/sculptor for 
the Span of Sunset Shop and Necessaries Toy 
Foundation, which produce toys for the edgier 



market. He will be showing the toy making 
process, from the beginning stage to how it 
looks after production, at the talk also. 

Hailing from Oxnard, Calif, Cabrera is 
eager to help students aspiring to get into the 
comic book or children's entertainment field. 

"I want to give back to younger people 
what a lot of professionals did for me. I was 
lucky enough really young to run into a lot of 
really cool people who kind of showed me the 
ropes; I almost felt obligated into passing on 
the torch," Cabrera said. "I know how con- 
fused I was when I was young; how I wanted 
to work in comic books when I turned 1 7 and 
how impossible that seemed. I just want to 
give back to anyone that's confused or inter- 
ested in art in any way." 

Dan Clark is a Peabody Award-winning 
writer and series creator. He is also the engine 
for The Dan Clark Company, which has pro- 
duced shows like "Brats of the Lost Nebula," 



for Kids WB! with the Jim Henson Company, 
as well as "The Same-Urns!" for the Discovery 
Kids channel. He has also worked on redevel- 
oping the comic action franchise "Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtles." Clark received the 
George Foster Peabody Award for "Totally 
for Kids," a kid's ethics campaign for the Fox 
Kids Network. 

Students of all majors are encouraged to 
attend. 

"Where I come from and where Dan 
comes from are two different places and we 
meet in the middle," Cabrera said. "Anybody 
that wants to see cool art and understand how 
they can do whatever they want to do in the 
future or just have questions about anything 
that concerns art should definitely come." 

The admission is free and open to the 
public. Anyone wanting more information can 
call the multimedia department at x324l. 



Game "Sands of Time" is puzzling yet fun 



By Mathew Berner 
Special to the Echo 



With the original release of 1989's 
"Prince of Persia" came the renewal of the 
industry's interest in the action-adventure 
genre as well as the raising of the bar for 
games to come. With the passing of nearly 
15 years, not until now has a game been 
attached to the "Prince of Persia" title that 
so doubtlessly deserved it. Captivating 
its audience with riveting game play and 
incredible ingenuity, "Sands of Time" 
fuses together interactive 3D environ- 
ments with motion pictures to create one 
distinguished game. 

In an attempt to depict a true cin- 
ematic experience. "Sands of Time" flows 
close to perfect from cut-scene to game 
play; even the game's opening menu and 
'new game' option creates a near-flaw- 
less transition. Dramatic imagery and 
reputable 3D environments capture what 
one would expect of an ancient Persian 
Empire. Whether swinging from the 
castle tree branches or dashing along the 
wall in hopes of avoiding one of many 



spiked pits, the young prince's fluid acro- 
batics are just as visually astounding, if 
not more so, than the environment itself. 
Even the castle's tapestries come to life as 
the young prince's actions cause them to 
ruffle in his wake as he dashes past them. 
"Sands of Time" can be picked up 
and enjoyed by any age group. Taking 
perhaps five minutes to adjust to the 
controls, the character's abilities consist 
of far more than simple adventure game 
actions. Climbing columns, swinging 
from ropes, strafing along ledges, and 
dashing along walls in either vertical 
or horizontal directions are a few of the 
young prince's numerous abilities. Many 
puzzles fill the enchanted castle, each fit- 
ting smoothly into the flow of the game. 
Spike pits, levers, pulleys, and razor-sharp 
saw blades decorate the vast and expan- 
sive halls. 

Nearly as intuitive as the puzzles is 
the battle system. Beyond basic button 
mashing, the player is able to get behind 
his enemies by scaling them, as well as 
diving off walls in what often turns out to 
be a one-hit kill. Exciting at first, espe- 



cially after incorporating the abilities of 
rewinding and slowing time, battle tends 
to become a chore as the game's main 
fights consist of far more enemies than 
necessary. Even with the prince's pristine 
abilities, players can expect to participate 
in any of the game's major battles count- 
less times. And don't forget, if at any time 
you find yourself neglecting to steal the 
souls of your fallen enemies, they may 
jump back up to continue their assault. 
That, along with keeping your less-than- 
useless ally alive, often causes battles to 
take much longer than the player would 
like. 

The game offers a unique feel of 
excitement and wonder that has not been 
seen in a long time. While unlockables 
such as an original "Prince of Persia" port 
do exist, unless you feel like cheating, you 
will most likely walk through the entire 
game without discovering them. 

This game is a must-rent if not 
purchase, first for those who love the 
mind-blowing puzzles, and second for 
those who love hack-and-slash action that 
pulses strongly though the game's veins. 



®5ffi "EiCHin 



The Echo 



OPINION 



March 24, 2004 



Cohab. policy needs revision 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be pub- 
lished on the following dates: 

April 7 

April 14 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



The administration's recent decision to 
vote against an RHA proposal, endorsed by the 
majority of the student population, to change the 
current visitation left me shocked and appalled to 
my bitter core. 

The proposal sought to change the current 
visitation policy to allow 24-hour visitation 
privileges on weekends. This would have made 
the cohabitation rule enforceable only during the 
week. In essence, the proposal would have pro- 
tected the positive intent of the current visitation 
policy and updated the old-fashioned policy to 
reflect the requests of the current student body. 



The intent of policy is two-fold: to prevent dorm 
residents from being overwhelmed by a room- 
mate's significant other spending every night in 
the dorm, and secondly, to discourage sexual 
relations in the residence halls. 

By abolishing the cohabitation rule only on 
weekends, in would preserve the former while 
being realistic about the latter. It is both naive and 
absurd to assume that by prohibiting members of 
the opposite sex from congregating in dorms 
for five hours during the night will discourage 
sexual relations. Any sexually active student 
or pragmatic administrator knows that sex can 
occur before 2 a.m. Thus, the second prong of 
the policy's intent is not currently met. 

RHA director Alex Mallen noted that, 
"Although the proposal represented the preferred 
policy of the majority of the student residential 
community, the cabinet was unanimous in the 
perspective that the current policy is more reflec- 
tive of the history, character and philosophy of 
California Lutheran University as a residential 
college that the current administration wishes 
to maintain." 

Despite any objections the administration 
may raise, university policy should not reflect 



history. Outdated (or historical) policies need 
lo be replaced. CLU is a progressive univer- 
sity (especially compared to other Lutheran 
universities), and the school's policies should 
be representative of this. The current visitation 
policy prohibits members of the opposite sex 
from being in the same dorm between the hours 
of 2 a.m. and 7 a.m. and students found in viola- 
tion of this policy receive harsh sanctions. It is 
unclear how the current policy reflects CLU's 
"character" or "philosophy" 

Currently, the policy fails to consider the 
sexual relations or other habits of same-sex cou- 
ples. Thus, same-sex couples are exempt from the 
cohabitation rules of the visitation policy On its 
face, the policy assumes that all couples are com- 
posed of members of the opposite sex. Certainly, 
this is an outdated assumption that holds little 
merit in today's society Administrators must 
realize that some CLU students participate in 
same-sex relationships. 

It is time the administration takes into 
account the requests of the students and the sexu- 
al revolution of recent generations. The visitation 
policy should be changed lo reflect the changing 
atmosphere here at CLU and elsewhere. 



Donald trumps ratings 



Letter to the Editor 



By Brandee J.Tecson 
Columnist 



Finally, real-estate mogul Donald 
Trump is venturing into a place he 
has never been before: reality TV. 
Ever since its debut last January, 
"The Apprentice" has been a bona 
fide prime time hit. Its premiere epi- 
sode took the golden lime slot after 
"Friends" and, with it, about 18.5 mil- 
lion viewers. 

The show has consistently 
drawn in almost 19 million viewers 
per week, even while competing with 
CBS's reigning hit "CSI: Crime Scene 
Investigation" and Fox's "American 
Idol." 

Numbers like those haven't been 
seen since Evan Marriott "punk'd" a 
slew of women into thinking he was 
"Joe Millionaire" in January 2003. 

In this new reality show, 16 aspir- 
ing business moguls compete to win 
Trump's favor and land "the dream job 
of a lifetime" as his yearlong protege 
at one of The Donald's top companies 
at a salary of $250,000 a year. 

In a time of economic instabil- 
ity, a six-figure corporate gig at The 
Trump Organization is looking mighty 
enticing, not to mention how far some 
of these people will go lo capture that 
primo title. After all, you can't have 
a reality show without some sleaze, 
right? Welcome to Wall Street, folks. 

Special "job assignments" will 



force the feisty aspinng entrepreneurs 
to think outside the box in order to 
outperform each other lo get lo the 
top. Let the catfights and backslab- 
bing begin. 

"Most of them will be assign- 
ments that executives face in their daily 
lives. The twist is that these teams are 
thrown out to the wolves of the New 
York business world with only a few 
days to complete incredibly difficult 
tasks, many of which have hundreds 
of thousands of dollars at stake," said 
a spokesperson for the show. 

Now, as a communication major 
with a business minor, I, along with 
many other college students, applaud 
Donald for forging this new type of 
reality show that actually puts brains 
above brawn. 

However, experts have criticized 
the women for using their sex appeal 
to win the assignments. In the last epi- 
sode, when the teams were instructed 
to run a popular Times Square restau- 
rant, the women joined customers on 
the floor while taking shots of liquor. 
Some deem their act as unethical. 
Others see it as using their natural 
assets. After all, sex does sell. 

So who has the savvy to make 
it to the top of the corporate ladder? 
With half of the participants now gone, 
it appears to be anyone's game. 

And, at this point, with a quarter- 
million dollar paycheck on the line, the 
game will only get dirtier. 



A Bi-scream social? The Gay Men's Choir? Did these events 
occur at California Lutheran University? The last time I checked 
I thought I was attending a Christian university. As a fairly new 
student to CLU, I had applied under the pretense that I was apply- 
ing to a Christian university and that that university would promote 
Christian morals. I believe in allowing a diversity of opinions, but 
it is misleading for prospective students who apply to the university 
who expect to be immersed in a Christian environment and are not. 

Despite being completely contradictory to the Christian faith, 
the Gay Men's Choir is discriminatory. What if I started a choir that 
was exclusively heterosexual? Even more so, the CLU health office 
distributes condoms. Now, I'm not so naive as to believe tliat pre- 
marital sex does not occur on campus. However, this school should 
not be encouraging it Situations like these should not be accepted. 
This university was founded and established with a Christian foun- 
dation. 

Last year JIF (Jesus is Freedom) received hostility for "shoving 
Christianity in people's faces" inappropriately by displaying "too 
many" crosses on campus; but tor some reason no such hostility 
exists when a giant closet is placed in the middle of campus for 
people to "come out" of. There are many other public universities 
in which students can express whatever they want If Otis university 
wants to maintain its Christian credibility, it should either remove 
the Christian label or remove the practices that contradict Christian 
thought and behavior. If you are going to call me "homophobic," 
I am not Let me clear this up now so there is no confusion: my 
entire point for writing this editorial is to understand how California 
Lutheran University can claim to support both Christian doctrine 
and the GSA (Gay Straight Alliance), which clearly goes against the 
tenets of Christianity. 

Michael Falcone 
Sophomore 



Wm go™ 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks. CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465: 
Fax (805) 493-3327: E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



3I3TE lEaac® 



March 24, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Pioneers trek all over the Kingsmen's winning 
streak, taking both games in the double header 















^~ * 7V^ 


- 


> 


* y 








1 ^<#y 










Photograph hy Kyle Peterson 
You 're mil! California Lutheran s second baseman lags his base before [he runner and lurns 
lofirsl to finish the double-play. 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University base- 
ball winning streak was off to a good start this 
week, but it was broken on March 20. 

The Kingsmen first took on the 
Wisconsin-La Crosse Eagles on Monday, 
March 15. The score was tied at 1-1 in the 
fifth inning until sophomore Christian Hariot 
doubled in junior Clay Alarcon to put CLU in 
the lead. 

The Kingsmen also had two more RBI 
singles by junior David Ramirez; he fin- 
ished the day off three-for-four. Senior Doug 
Camett earned the first save of the year for the 
Kingsmen. Junior Lionel Carrizales picked up 
the win for the Kingsmen. He gave up two 
runs on five hits in eight innings, and he struck 
out five. 

The Kingsmen then took on the 
Westmont Warriors on Tuesday, March 16. 
The Kingsmen were victorious, winning the 



game 8-5. CLU was down 2-0 before they tied 
the score in the fourth inning; they then added 
two more in the fifth. They also scored four in 
the sixth. 

Alarcon was three-for-four with an RBI, 
two runs scored and three stolen bases. Junior 
Simon Lozano had two hits and three RBIs. 
Sophomore Matt Hirsh got the win for the 
Kingsmen; he gave up three runs on eight hits, 
and struck out five in six innings. Junior Billy 
Weber picked up the save after two innings. 

"We got off to a slow start, then settled 
down and came back with the win. I love play- 
ing with them, especially because we always 
battle it out, we just want that win so badly," 
Lozano said. 

The Kingsmen's 10-game winning streak 
came to an end on Saturday, March 20, against 
Cal State Hayward. The Kingsmen played a 
doubleheader against them, losing both. The 
first game score was 8-7, while the second was 
not as good. Hayward crushed CLU, 6-1 . 



Above: The California Lutheran University baseball 
bat. Below: Pitcher Doug Carnetl lakes a moment to 

"We have to give credit where credit is 
due. They were a good team and they were 
hard to beat," Junior Dominick Macri said. 

Cerda was a perfect three-for-three 
with a home run and a pair of RBIs. Junior 
Johnnie Machado also had a home run. 
Junior Jon Calmes went six innings and 
gave up five runs on 1 1 hits. Weber took 
the loss. 

The Kingsmen had 12 hits in the first 
game but in the second game, they just 
couldn't get their bats into swing and fin- 
ished with only one hit. 

Junior Nick Bjork had a solo home run. 
Carrizales took the loss; he gave up six runs 
and struck out five in 7.2 innings. 

"We need to get back to capitalizing on 
the opportunity. We need to play good defense 
and hit the ball a lot better, like we did during 
our 10-game winning streak. That's how we 
won and we need to keep it like that." Bjork 
said. 



Photographs by Kyle Pclerson 
learn looks on as ils teammate is up to 
converse with his catcher 




Winning Streak ends Silvertrust makes Alt-Tourney team 

^5 shooting a 79 and Nyhus and Vemer both 



By Scott Flanders 

Sports Information Director 

\ 

Cal Baptist put an end to the Regals' 
Softball seven-game win streak on Thursday, 
March 18, at Lancer Field. The Lancers shut 
out the Regals in the first game 6-0 and again 
in game two 10-0. 

California Lutheran University dropped 
to 8-12 overall, while the Lancers upped their 
record to 1 8-6. 

The story of the first game was a no-hit- 
ter thrown by Cal Baptist senior Lisa Spencer. 
She pitched all seven innings, allowing no 
hits and gave up just two walks. Geanie 
Jenkins had two hits, two RBIs and scored a 
run for the Lancers. 



Olivia Chacon pitched 5.1 innings, giv- 
ing up six runs and 10 hits for Cal Lutheran. 

In game two, the Regals were kept quiet 
again while Cal Baptist scored 10 runs. 

Cal Lutheran started Danielle Everson 
who gave up five runs after two innings. 
Gianna Regal took over the pitching duties 
but allowed five more runs to cross after 
1.2 innings. Carrie Mitchell and Meagan 
Loesche had Cal Lutheran's only hits for 
the day. 

Candice Thomas and Amanda Xavier 
combined to pitch a two-hitter for Cal Baptist. 
Leadoff hitter Jamie Lowe hit a grand slam 
off Everson in the second inning. 

The Regals will participate in the Tucson 
Touranment Friday, March 26, through 
Saturday, March 27. 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Congratulations 
Zareh Avedian 

on being named 

D3hoops.com 
All- West Region Third Team 
for the second consecutive year 



The Kingsmen golf team placed ninth 
out of 1 6 NCAA Division II I teams after two 
rounds at the Huntington Invitational. 

"Our team did well," Head Coach Jeff 
Lindgren said. "I was happy with the way we 
played. We struggled a bit on both days with 
the fourth score. Because of the golf course 
being in great shape, everyone had a chance 
to do better. 

"They were all NCAA Division [II teams, 
mostly from Georgia and North Carolina," 
Lindgren said. "We were the only team from 
California. There were a couple teams from 
Louisiana, there were a couple teams from 
Alabama and one team from Texas." 

"It was definitely a fun time," freshmen 
Christian Colunga said. "It was a good place, 
and we had great weather. The spa was nice. 
We did all right; we could have done better." 

The team shot a 3 1 6 in the first round 
on Monday, March 15, as senior Jordan 
Silvertrust completed the par-72 course 3-up. 
Junior Jason Poyser finished with a 77, soph- 
omore Peder Nyhus finished with a 78 and 
Colunga and freshman Nick Vemer finished 
with an 86 and an 88, respectively. 

The Kingsmen shot a 309 in the second 
round on Tuesday, March 16. with Silvertrust 
shooting a 71, Poyser shooting a 75, Colunga 



shooting a 79 and Nyhus and Vemer both 
shooting an 84. 

Silvertrust made the All-Tournament 
team by placing third out of 96 people. 

"Jordan Silvertrust played really well," 
Lindgren said. "He's working extremely 
hard. He was two-over par total for the two 
rounds." 

Silvertrust said that only the top five 
players with the lowest scores make the 
team and that scores in the tournament are 
counted differently than in the SCIAC. 

"We counted two low scores in the 
70s," Silvertrust said. "In the SCIAC, we 
have six guys and we count the four lowest 
scores. But in the tournament, we only have 
five guys and we count four, so we have the 
sixth guy to rely on." 

"There was definitely a lot of good 
competition [at the tournament]," Colunga 
said. "There were definitely a lot more 
consistent teams, compared to the SCIAC 
teams." 

The team travels to Lompoc for the 
Kingsmen Invitational on March 22 and 
March 23 and competes in its last invita- 
tional on April 5 and April 6. 

"We were very happy with the weather 
and with the way we played," Silvertrust 
said. "We definitely want to finish in the top 
spot at the Kingsmen Invitational. Finishing 
in the top three spots in both tournaments 
will help us advance to the NCAA National 
Tournament." 



Gljqs ^aac® 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 24, 2004 



Water polo secures second victory 




Photographs by Bell Lopczr 
Above: Freshman goalie Kayla Schrock saves another 
goal. Top right: Junior Brittany Zubtale looks for a pass. 
Bottom right: Junior Danielle Rios dodges defenders. 




By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University's 
women's water polo team split this week, as it 
lost to Wagner but picked up its second win of 
the season against Macalaster. 

The Regals first took on Wagner at Oaks 
Christian School in Westlake, Calif., on Tuesday. 
March 16. It was a tough game for the Regals; 
they were drowned 15-5. 

Freshman Mackenzie Faumuina scored 
the first goal in the first two minutes. Freshman 
Kenyuo Ishida also had two goals herself. 
Freshman goalie Kayla Schrock had eight 
saves. 

"We just went in playing tough and worked 
as a team to do the best we could," Faumuina 
said. 

The Regals scored one in the first quarter, 
two in the second and two in the fourth. 

The Regals then took on Macalaster again 
at Oaks Christian School for the second time in 
four days. The Regals fought hard and were able 
to pull out the win; they beat Macalaster 7-5. 



"We are glad to pull off the win and beat 
Macalaster for the second time," freshman 
Michele Hernandez said. 

Junior Danielle Rios got a hat trick, pulling 
out three goals herself, while freshmen Scarlet 
Williams and Hernandez had two goals apiece. 
Schrock had 1 7 saves in the net 

The Regals scored two in the first quarter, 
three in the second and two in the fourth. 

"We are happy with our improvements; we 
are working hard at every practice and game," 
Hernandez said. "We hope to continue with our 
improvements and to keep going strong." 

CLU will be hosting Chapman Saturday, 
March 27, at home. 

"We are happy with our 
improvements; we are 
working hard at every 
practice and game." 

Michele Hernandez 
Freshman 



Regals play flawless tennis Tennis experiences tough week 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



TheNo. 1 8 California Lutheran University 
Regals started a tough midseason week against 
the Skidmore College Thoroughbreds on 
Monday, March 15. 

The Regals, who defeated the 
Thoroughbreds 9-0, were in total control of 
the match from the beginning. 

In doubles, the Thoroughbreds could not 
get more than six games from the Regals in 
the pro-sets. No. 1 doubles Jen Hansen and 
Rebecca Hunau defeated Heather Fuleihan 
and Whitney Dolan 8-2; No. 2 doubles 
Lisa Novajosky and Blair Murphy defeated 
Madeleine Pauli and Jill Damon 8-6 and No. 
3 doubles Stephanie Perkins and Brianna 
Smalling defeated Chris Gale and Gabby 
Rosenthal 8-1. 

In singles play, the Regals kept up the 
good work and didn't drop any matches. No. 1 
(No. 22 nationally) Hansen defeated Whitney 
Dolan 6-0, 6-4 and also No. 2 (No. 47 nation- 
ally) Hunau defeated Chris Gale 6-1, 6-1. All 
the other singles scores were also favorable to 
the Regals. 

"We knew that they were weaker than us, 
but yet again we still had to play our toughest 
and play like we have been playing. We are 
doing a great job at doubles and that gets us 
going for singles," senior Hunau said. 

The next match of the week would come 
on Saturday, March 20, with a double header 
for the Regals at home, starting with a match 
against the Southwestern University Pirates 
where the Regals won with a sweep of 9-0. 
The Regals again started with a powerful 
doubles performance and attacked the Pirates, 
not letting them anywhere near a doubles 
point, dropping no more than seven games 
for all three pro-sets. Hunau and Hansen 



defeated Tara Kurtz and Lauren Row 8-4 at 
No. 1 doubles, and Novajosky and Murphy 
defeated Melanie Kurtz and Melissa Taylor 
8-2 at No. 2. 

Singles proved a little more competitive 
up top where No. 22 Hansen struggled to beat 
Row with a score of 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 at No. 1 
singles; No. 47 Hunau defeated Sandra Smith 
6-1,6-2 at No. 2 singles; Novajosky defeated 
Taylor 6-1, 6^1 at No. 3 and Murphy defeated 
M.Kurtz 6-3, 6-1 at No 4. 

"This match was another tough win for us 
as a team. A lot of teams are coming out here 
for spring break, and I am happy that we are 
bulldozing all of them," sophomore Murphy 
said. 

To finish the weekend matches, the 
Pacific Lutheran University Lutes visited 
Thousand Oaks, Calif, to take on the Regals. 
Again, with doubles under control from 
the very beginning, the Regals got their three 
points on the board with wins by all three 
doubles teams. 

"Doubles has been a big part of our game 
against other schools and we have a great 
depth on the team. It was a good day to be 
a Regal on Saturday," Head Coach Nancy 
Garrison said. 

Some of the highlights in singles against 
the Lutes were at No. 3 singles Novajosky 
defeated Katie Ogin 6-1, 6-0; No. 4 singles 
Murphy defeated Bria Smith 6-1, 6-1; and 
returning from injury to singles, No. 6 singles 
Stephanie Pericins defeated Elizabeth Galbraith 
6-4,6-1. 

The Regals will face the University of the 
South Tigers at home on Wednesday, March 
24, at 2 p.m. to try and keep the winning 
streak. 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



With half the tennis season gone this 
year, the California Lutheran Kingsmen had 
a very tough episode to go through this last 
week. On Tuesday. March 16, the Kingsmen 
were amfronted by Whitman College who 
beat the Kingsmen in Thousand Oaks, Calif. 
The score, which showed trouble for the 
Kingsmen by losing the doubles point, was a 
spark for the Kingsmen. 

Singles play would shape the match 
the same way when junior co-captain Quinn 
Caldaron would see himself fighting for the 
No. 1 singles match against Steven Ly at 3-3 
and losing in three sets. 

"He made me work a lot with his smart 
shots, exposing situations that I really haven't 
worked on a whole lot. This tells me that 
I have to woik on other situations for the 
future," Caldaron said. 

The scores that were favorable to the 
Kingsmen were only in singles. No. 2 J.V 
Vallejos defeated David Miller 6-1, 6-4; No. 
4 Junya Hasebe defeated Dane Miller 6-1, 
6-2 and No. 6 Joel Wettemolm defeated Sam 
Spiegel 6-1, 6-3. 

Another match-up that the Kingsmen 
would endure would be traveling to Santa 
Cruz, Calif, to play the University of the South 
on Friday, March 19, and also University of 
California Santa Cruz on Saturday, March 
20. 

The best match for the Kingsmen this 
week was against the University of the South 



Tigers. The match ended with a score of 7-0. 

"Some of us thought that it would be 
an easy match since we had never heard 
of them before and we started a little slow, 
but at the end we picked it up and ended up 
with a strong win to get us ready for the next 
day against the Slugs." sophomore Karlo 
Arapovic said. 

Some of the scores against the Tigers 
were the wins created by Caldaron winning 
6-4, 6-3 and also Vallejos who won 6-1,6-2 
against his opponent 

The one big focus of the trip was to 
play the University of California Santa Cruz 
Banana Slugs who are currently the No. 5 
team in the nation in NCAA Division HI. The 
Slugs have four players ranked individually in 
the top 30 and are also the No. 1 team on the 
West Coast. 

The Slugs overpowered the Kingsmen, 
who are No. 12 in the nation. No. 1 singles 
Caldaron lost to Brian Casey 7-5, 6-3 and 
Hasebe lost to Shane Templeman 6-3, 6-2. 

"The match could have gone either 
way, I felt All the games went to deuce and I 
played great and I know that I could have beat 
him since I beat him at a tournament easily 
last year," said senior co-captain Hasebe. 

Head Coach Mike Genette expected a 
great performance from the team this week- 
end. 

"I thought it was a great weekend for 
the team. Every week the team gets better 
and better, and I can't wait to see how good 
the team will look in about a month," Genette 
said. 



Congratulations 

Beardo Express 

Intramural Soccer Champions 
Beardo Express defeated Hakuna Matatah 

(4-3) 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn S2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamp.com 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 21 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



March 31, 2004 



Sports 

Kingsmen golf takes second in 
CLU tournament. 



See story page 8 



Features 

Ghost haunts CLU music house. 



See story page 5 



News 

Women 's Resource Center set to 
close down. 



See story page 3 




Pacific Element bandmates Adam Jussel and Kyle Paterik perform one of the band's 
songs. 

Jamfest rocks CLU 



Coalition Bear lead singer Steve Ford thrashes around 
during the band's performance. 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Students rocked the night away in the 
Preus-Brandt Forum, where California Lutheran 
University bands Pacific Element and Coalition 
Bear took to the stage at CLU's Jamfest on Tuesday, 
March 23. 

Jamfest was a benefit concert held for The 
National Association for Music Education. A basket 
was placed in front of the door for students to leave 
donations. 

Junior Adam Jussel organized the event in asso- 
ciation with the Community Service Center. 

"Adam came to me with the idea; we helped 
him find an organization," Community Service 
Center Director Angela Rowley said. 

According to the MENC website, its mission is 
to "help advance music education by encouraging 
the study and making of music by all." 

The night began with senior Jimmy Fox intro- 
ducing Pacific Element. 

Lead singer Kyle Paterik came out to the 
stage and joked with the audience that he was "a 
one-man band." As Paterik began to play the first 
song on his guitar, drummer Mike Judd appeared, 
and one-by-one guitarists Jussel and Nick 

Paul followed. 

The band played a 45-minute set featuring the 
songs "Leave The Light On" and "Catch Me If You 
Can." 

Between songs, Paterik joked with the audience 
and reminded people to give to the cause. 

Pacific Element ended its set with the song 
titled "Home." 

Between band performances, Fox asked lead 
singer of Coalition Bear Steve Ford what the band's 
style was like. 

"It's like Kid Rock but, more Kid Rock," Ford 



said. "Watch out for Jack Howard. He's freakin' 
crazy." 

"I like to see these guys play. They go all out," 
Fox said as Coalition Bear took the stage. 

Ford entered the stage by sliding down what 
appeared to be a firefighter's pole as the band 
opened up with its song "Twelve Floz." 

Coalition Bear is made up of Ford on lead 

"I thought [Jamfest] was 
a really neat idea. It was a 
very worthwhile cause." 



Courtney Parks 
Junior 




Coalition Bear bassist Quinn Breston plays as Steve 
Ford belts out his lyrics. 




vocals, Jack Howard on guitar, Brian Wynn on 
guitar, Brett Leonard on drums and Quinn Brenston 
on bass. 

"Adam asked our band [to play] We love play- 
ing anywhere. It's for a good cause," Ford said. 

During songs like "Clouded," "Remember" and 
"If it Stops," Ford entertained the crowd by jumping I 
all over the stage as he sang. 

During Coalition Bear's final song, Ford told the I 
crowd members that if they did not get out of their 
seats, the band would not perform the last song. 

The crowd was on its feet and a few students | 
began a small mosh pit in front of the stage. 

One fan rushed the stage as the band continued I 
performing its last song. Then Ford dived off the 
stage and was caught by Jussel, who was in the L_ 
crowd Coalition Bear guitarist Jack Howard helps out on the 

"I thought [Jamfest] was a really neat idea, vocals. 
It was a very worthwhile cause," junior Courtney 
Parks said. "It was fun to see them perform." 



All photographs by Stephanie Shaker 



The Echo 



Calendar 




MARCH 31, 2004 



a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

march 3\ 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Student Recital (Class) 

Chapel 
■6:30 p.m. 




Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 


Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Apartments Lounge 
6 p.m. 




The NEED P H 


thursday 

april 1 


sub «N-q 

10 p.m. V- L i" 


Happy April Fool's Day! 






friday 

april 2 

Spring Break 

begins at 4 p.m. 



Where are YOU going? 

Come find out more at the 

Study Abroad Office 

Talk to Grace or Kacey 

Building E-9 or x3750 

studyabroad@clunet.edu 

Open Mon - Trior., 72 fo ? p.m. 



Asian Club and 
Friends 

Meetings are held every 

TUESDAY at 6 p.m. 
in Thompson Hall Lounge 

Join us for FOOD, FUN and FRIENDS 

Everyone is WELCOME! 

For more information, call: 
Saloshi Milsumori. president 
(818) 590-7625 



"7TX7r"jT 



ill Iki 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800 -$3500+ for the sum 
mer working with children outdoors! 

Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 




DISTRIBUTE BROCHURES 

Earn $375 to $560 a month work- 
ing only 22 hours a month! Pref- 
erably Monday through Friday. 
Must be available after 2 p.m. 

For more information, call: 
I (866) 7-TUTORS 



classifieds 

Weekend Job Opportunity: Great weekend 
job! 510/hr. Need enthusiasm lo hold sign to 
direct buyers lo new home. Must have trans- 
portation. Hiring immediately for Agoura Hills. 

If interesied.call: 

(800) 343-8368 

Tutors Needed: $15-S18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized lest scores 
(SATI/II, GRE, etc.) 

If interested, mail information [o: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310) 282-6424 

or email resume to: 

JDStructorbiruig6 @ aceeducation.com 

Classified ads can be placed 
on the Calendar page for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and clarity. 
Call: 

(SOS) <*&-■&$ 



FINAL DAY TO APPLY FOR MAY 2004 
GRADUATION IS THIS THURSDAY 



FREE SUPPORT CROUP 



for Eating Disorder 
Recoverers 

Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. 
in the F-Building 

Sponsored by the CLU 
Counseling Center and 
Marriage, Family Child 
Center, in conjunction with 
the National Association 
of Anorexia Nervosa and 
Associated Disorders 

(ANAD). 

For more information, please feel 

free to call or email me or log 

onto: http://www.altrue.net/site/ 

anadweb/ 

ANAD - National Association 

of Anorexia Nervosa and 

Associated Disorders 

Camille Collett, LCSW, DCSW 
Ext: 3390 
ccollett(a>clunet.edu ■ 



International Peer Mentors? 



Become a mentor to new international 
students 

Share your college experience and 
knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 12 - 30 th 
@ front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to May 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 

For information, call: 
luanita Pryor Halt @ (BOS) 493-395 1 







T 




" BE THE DirrERENCE " 

(A Mentoring Program) 

Become a mentor to an Upward Bound* 
high school student 

Share your college experience and knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 1 2 - 30 th 
@ front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to Mau 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 
For information, call luanita Pryor Halt® 1805) 493-395 1 



1 

1 



STUDENT INVOLVEMENT MEETING 




IRVINE CAMPUS UNIVERSITY GRANT 
Wednesday, March 31 st 
6 to 8 P.M. in Nygreen 1 

PIZZA AND DRINKS PROVIDED 

LEAKS! HOW YOU CAN ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE 
IN HELPING CLU -REACH OUR DIVERSITY GOALS 



SPONSORED BY THE PRESIDENT S DIVERSITY COUNCIL 
For information, call Juanita Pryor hall at (805) 493-3951 



BSU; BLACK 
STUDENT UNION 



Meetings are held every 

MONDAY at S:15 p.m. 

In the Apartments Lounge 

CULTURE, FUN, & FELLOWSHIP!! 

Everyone is WELCOME ! 

For more information, call: 

Juanita Prvor Hall 

(805) 493-3951 

BSUAdfiser 



March 31, 2004 



NEWS 



The Echo 3 



Women's Resource Center closing 



By Tammy Austin 
Staff Writer 



After nearly tliree decades of service, 
California Lutheran University's Women's 
Resource Center will close at the end of the 
spnng semester 2004 as a result of shifting 
budgetary priorities and the need for realloca- 
tion of fiscal resources. 

"It's a huge disappointment," said WRC 
Director Dr. Kateri Alexander. "The center 
has been a tremendous asset to the university. 
Students who can't find their way find a space 
for themselves in the center as a place where 
they can connect with the campus commu- 
nity." 

"Over the last year we have carefully 
considered and weighed the issues and have 
come to a difficult decision to take this step 
and close the WRC," said CLU President 



Earn your Master's 

in Computer Science 

in just 1 5 months 



Luther Luedtke. "This, by no means, should 
be taken as a statement that the work of the 
WRC is not significant. It is, and there will be a 
continued effort to serve the needs of students 
of all diversities and genders." 

The WRC and the Women's Studies pro- 
gram were established in 1974 to provide sup- 
port and service to CLU students, staff, faculty 
and the surrounding communities. As part of 
the support services, the WRC provided five 
scholarships, advocacy programs, mentoring, 
community service and academic, financial 
and personal counseling. In particular, the 
center focused on the increasing number of 
re-entry women on campus and their specific 
issues. 

According to Bill Rosser, vice president 
for student affairs and dean of students, there 
were two sources of funding for the center. 
About 530,000 of proceeds came from the 
program Creative Options: A Day for Women. 
The last Creative 
Options was held 
earlier this semes- 
ter. This money 
was raised and 
spent by the WRC 



CLU's 2003-2004 fiscal budget contributed 
the other funding of S45, 690. It is this money 
that the university is cutting and redeploying to 
other categories. 

"It was primarily a fiscal decision in order 
to make the university work on many levels 
next year. That includes tilings like other 

"It's a huge 
disapointment. The 
center has been a 
tremendous asset to the 
university." 

Dr. Kateri Alexander 
Former WRC Director 

university programs, services and faculty sala- 
ries," Rosser said. 

"The process has been reviewed by the 
University Planning and Budget Committee 
and will be continually assessed in order to 
devote resources most strategical 1>> Luedtke 
said. "The decision was not easily reached but 
ultimately needed for the other programs of the 
university." 



"Every year, two to three students, 
sometimes as many as five, are retained as a 
direct result of the support and services of the 
WRC," Alexander said. "This means that these 
students don't leave, transfer or quit CLU. In 
most instances, the student doesn't feel like 
she belongs. We help her find a connection 
that keeps her here." 

"Every week, 10-20 people come to our 
Brown Bag lunch. We also receive a lot of 
daily e-mails and phone calls about the center 
and its services. Our strength is in the quality 
of the service we provide and in the time we 
take to be one-on-one," Alexander said. 

"I have been close enough to the WRC 
to know that it does some very good things. 
From my perspective, we have to make some 
choices about which good things to do. I 
don't see it as a choice between good and bad 
alternatives. It is just setting aside one good 
thing in order lo accomplish many other good 
things." Rosser said. "It is sad and disappoint- 
ing, but realistic. I wish we could do it all, but 
we can't." 

Students who wish to learn more about 
the closing of the WRC can contact Alexander 
atx3345or Rosser at x3553. 



Cal Lutheran now offers an evening MSCS 
degree program. Classes are offered 
year-round, in four 11 -week terms: 

■ Design your course schedule to 
meet your needs 

■ State-of-the-art learning facilities 

■ Wi-Fi campus 

■ Small student-to-faculty ratio 

Choose from the following elective courses: 

■ Informatics 

■ Multimedia 

■ Database 

■ Embedded Systems 

■ Intelligence Systems 

■ Image Processing 

Accredited by Western Association of Schools and Colleges 



Learn more about Cal Lutheran's 
evening degree programs 



Inter-American Development Bank 
to be involved in Encuentros Week 

Classroom, fall 2003. 




Call now for 

a free 
information 

packet. 

Summer 

term starts 

May 24. 



Toll-free: 1 -888-CLU-GRAD or 805-493-3 1 27 
E-mail: clugrad@clunet.edu 
www.clunet.edu/graduate 



California Lutheran University 



By Dr. Jessica Ramos-Harthun 
Staff Writer 

California Lutheran University has invited the 
Inter-American Development Bank to be the leading 
party in a videoconference session on issues related to 
the topic of indigenous peoples of the Americas during 
the Encuentros Week of April 19-23. This is a one-week 
festival dedicated to the promotion and appreciation of 
Latin American heritage and cultures within the CLU 
community. 

CLU is using a new teaching methodology incorpo- 
rating new technology, "The Transnational Classroom." 

This approach promotes cultural exchange among 
countries and continents by connecting distant classrooms 
via videoconferencing technology. The Transnational 
Classroom, conceptualized and implemented by Dr. 
Jessica Ramos-Harthun and Dr. Lourdes Sanchez- Lopez, 
has been published in the Learning Conference 2004, 
Institute of Education, London and Dimension 2003. 
Models for Excellence in Second Language Education. 

Last semester, CLU had a successful international 
videoconference series with the World Bank and the 
Organization of American Stales, including the simultane- 
ous participation of four other institutions in Mexico and 
throughout the United States as part of the Transnational 



Internationally recognized figures, such as assistant 
secretary general of the OAS, Ambassador Luigi R. 
Einaudi and the permanent representative of Mexico to 
the OAS, Ambassador Miguel Ruiz-Cabanas Izquierdo, 
joined the videoconference to discuss contemporary 
Inter- American issues such as NAFTA and hemisphenc 
security. 

The upcoming videoconference, "Encuentros with 
the inter-American Development Bank," is scheduled for 
April 21 from 12 to 2 p.m. and will cover several issues 
within the indigenous peoples of the Americas, the impact 
of globalization on these communities and the develop- 
mental objectives of the IDB. 

Anne Deruyttere, chief of indigenous peoples and 
Community Development Unit, Sustainable Development 
Department at the IDB, will be the main speaker of the 
event. 

The expected outcome will be an increased aware- 
ness among students and faculty on issues related to indig- 
enous peoples. Students will have the opportunity to place 
this issue in a social and historical perspective. 

The technical support comes from David Grannis, 
director of educational technology. 

For more information, contact Ramos-Harthun at 
x3435. 



Summer housing info 



By Angela Naginey 
Press Release 



Students who would like to live on campus after the 
spring 2004 semester and before the fall 2004 semester 
must meet one of the following criteria listed below. 

The cost for summer housing will be S1.800 for the 
full 1 5 weeks. The room and board cannot be separated 
and allows S35 per week to eat on campus. Summer 
housing applications and contracts will be 
available to pick up on April 1 2 and will 
be due Apnl 30. 

The criteria are as follows: 

* Attending summer school at CLU 
full-time (6 units) for each session. (12 
units for the entire summer) 

* Attending summer school at CLU 
full-time (6 units) for one session. (Note: 
You may only occupy summer housing for 
the session in which you are enrolled). 

* Attending summer school at CLU 



part-time (3 units) each session and working on-campus 
for CLU through Student Employment a minimum of 20 
hours per week each session. 

* Working full-time (40 hours/week) on-campus for 
CLU through Student Employment for the entire sum- 
mer or working part-time (not less then 20 hours/week) 
on-campus for CLU through Student Employment for the 
entire summer. 

Students who have any questions regarding summer 
housing should call Angela Naginey at x3220. 



'A 



Single? Dating Online? 



Get the Best Dates and find the person you Deserve with the Right Photo! 

H's Easy! Wed replace your easting Online Photo with a Professional Portrait that - yj- 

wll Guarantee your Picture will go from Meek to Sleek! It you donl have a picture yet, I i I 

call us for your new Online Portrait First impressions are everythng! A Pcture is worth a 1000 words! 
Package Include*: 
• Hall Hour Portrait Session ■ 20-25 Online Photo prools 
• 2 final Photos formatted & retouched tor your online service emailed lo you 
* Free Custom 8 x 10* • Available in Color and Black A White ONLY $125 R»q. $299 

Call TODAY for an appointment 805-446-1908 

tmd a date on Ihe Web, you better have a really good pidure"-The New York Times 

EADSHOT HIGHWAY 

Portraits for Online Dating ... 



wan iuui 

'II you're going lo find a 



I55C 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



March 31, 2004 



Do you kiss on a first date? 




Cory Hughes, English, 2004 

"It all depends on where you kiss." 



Valerie Vallejos, marketing communication, Kaleena Chappell, music, 2007 
2006 

"It just depends on the person.' 
"It's something I don't do, but if others 
want to, good for them." 



Michelle Ridenour, biology/chemistry, 2007 

"It depends on how the date is going and 
if you feel a connection." 




l_ 






Brendan Garrett asst. basketball coach 



Deanna Sheldon, business. 2006 



Marc Behnia, marketing communication, Brionna Morse, liberal studies, 2005 
2004 

"Peck, yes. Tongue, no. And no longer "It's people's right to do what they want on "I think it is unnecessary." 

"I think it's a given " than two seconds." dates... Personally. I don't believe in kissing 

until the wedding night" 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Claire Hillard. 



Car of the Week 




Have a fun and 
safe Spring Break! 



Excifcemend. Adventure. 
Surprise. Thrills. __ 

This ain't your parents travel agency ...BS 



Paris $467 Madrid. ..$602 

London. ...$426 Fiji $765 




HBBEgEMBa 

Hnuunn 

5 night accomm. 

LP/ CflBO/ 

4 night accomm. 

apnc p „ From: 

—■r $464 



$454 



One stop. No hassles. 

We've got everything you 
need for your next trip. 



Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson 

Junior Brian Hoover smokes the tires on his 1991 Mustang GT. Under 
his carbon fiber cowl induction hood is his custom built 347 stroker, 
500 h.p. V8. After investing over $25,000, the Mustang is just the way 
he wants it. 



IFffj yrRAVEL 



7280 Melrose Ave 16111 NordhoPF St, Matador Book Compli 

(323) 934.8722 (818) 882.4692 



| www.statravel.com I 



STUDENT TRAVEL & BEYOND 



lliHIHJINiH 



I.Tll'ltilHH 



March 31, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



Ghost haunts CLU music house attic 



By Moriah Harris-Rodger 
Special to the Echo 



Maybe it gets boring in the attic of the 
music house. She might feel lonely among 
the broken xylophones and piles of paper. 
Perhaps she misses her three sons, who 
used to sleep in those two small rooms 
that make up the attic. Maybe she doesn't 
like it that half of her house is cluttered 
with filing cabinets, old computers and 
instrument cases. 

That could be why she turns on the 
lights at night when she's alone, so the 
humming of the bulbs can break the 
silence. Possibly the bumps heard by the 
music faculty happen when she trips over 
the boxes and stacks of music cluttering 
the rooms. Maybe she just wants people 
to remember whose house it is. 

"Sometimes at night, when we have 
long recording sessions in the Ed Tech 
building, the lights in the music house 
would turn on and off," sophomore Jack 
Howard said. 

Howard has heard stories about Kam 
Pederson's ghost around the music depart- 
ment. 

"Spellbound" movie 
and director 
come to CLU 



By Yuri Perez 
Staff Writer 

The movie "Spellbound," produced 
by Sean Welch, is not only about spell- 
ing but also humor. The documentary, 
directed by Jeff Blitz, officially premiered 
in March 2002 at the Texas Film Festival. 
The movie is about the three-day National 
Spelling Bee Championship of 1999, in 
Washington, D.C. The participants of the 
spelling bee were elementary and middle 
school students who had won county and 
state spelling bees. 

Out of about 249 students, only 8 
students were featured in the film and 
interviewed thoroughly. The casting for 
this movie took several months. The pro- 
duction team had to go through numerous 
casting rounds and interviews before final- 
izing the official cast for the film. Those 
who were chosen were observed in their 
methods of studying and preparing for the 
spelling bee. All of the personalities of the 
students vary and so do their reasons for 
wanting to win. For most of the children, 
winning this contest meant everything and 
they were willing to sacrifice fun activities 
to prepare for the competition. 

The film lasts approximately an hour 
and 45 minutes. The first half covers the 
interviews of the students, and the second 
half of the film covers the actual spelling 
bee. 

After the showing of the film last- 
Monday, March 22, at CLU there was 
a small discussion in Overton Hall with 
Welch. He described the casting process 
and answered questions about the film. 

"I'll be using words in English, not 
in French this time," said Welch, joking 
about how the children in the film had 
to study French to leam the spelling of 
English words with French origins. 

When asked what she thought about 
the humor in the film, CLU student 
Lorena Gomezshe said, "I thought it was 
a nice addition; 1 don't believe it would 
have turned out as good without it." 



Pederson was the owner of the house 
until her sons sold it around the time of her 
death in 1960. According to records, she 
is probably the only woman who has lived 
in the house. 

"She haunts it, I guess," Howard 
said. 

Kristal Oz, the administrative assistant 
to the music department since October, has 
her office on the first floor of the music 
house. 

Oz's first experience with the ghost 
was when she was alone in the house and 
was using the restroom. She heard some- 
one try to open the door while she was in 
there, but when she opened the door, the 
house was empty. 

"Okay, I'm not going to think about 
this too much," Oz said of the incident. 

Joanne Tomlinson worked as the 
administrative assistant to the music 
department for seven years before Oz. 
She was interested to find out for herself if 
the ghost stories she heard from California 
Lutheran University security guards were 
true. 

Tomlinson remembered the security 
guards telling her that "they'd be on night 



duty and there'd be a light on and then off 
and the house would be locked," she said. 

"I have driven by when the lights 
were on upstairs." Tomlinson said. She 
thinks that there is a possibility that one 
of the professors was getting music in the 
attic of the music house, but she isn't sure 
and doubts that a professor would do it at 
night. 

She said that the music faculty heard 
noises every once in a while, too. 

She used to give a Boy Scout troop 
tours in the attic each year because they 
could earn a badge for going into a haunted 
house. 

"When you get up there, you get a 
shiver, a funny feeling," Tomlinson said. 

"I personally haven't heard anything 
that I couldn't account for," said Dan 
Geeting, professor of music. 

"This structure was built in 1911. The 
joints and everything are very loose. That 
it moves around and creeks and moans is 
not surprising," Geeting said. "But what 
Kristal described doesn't sound like the 
house moving." 

Geeting said that he doesn't discount 
the ghost stories, but he doesn't have any 



of his own. 

Dorothy Schechter, professor of music 
who has worked at CLU since 1976, 
doubts that the ghost is Pederson's. She 
does know that the ghost is the ghost of a 
woman, though. 

"Years ago, I saw a shadow walk 
across the window," Schechter said. She 
described the ghost as an apparition wear- 
ing a gauzy dress but was faint and with 
undefined features. 

"There's no way somebody was here; 
the office was locked," she said. Not even 
housekeeping goes up to the attic, she said. 
"It's off limits, not very safe." 

Schechter has never been scared of 
the ghost and says that the ghost "prob- 
ably lived here and feels comfortable 
being here." 

"All these crazy stories and they're 
all true, and that makes it kind of scary," 
Howard said. 

For those who wonder if the ghost 
they have seen around the music house, 
at the corner of Faculty and Regent, is 
Pederson. photos of Pederson and her fam- 
ily can be found in the hall of the admis- 
sions building. 



Spring Break hot spots for students 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 



It is that time again: all the studies can 
be left behind for a week of pure fun in the 
sun. The only question that remains is, where 
to go? 

If you are a camper, some places to go 
are Joshua Tree National Park and Big Bear, 
both in California, a vacation spot for those 
that want to get away, but not too far. Also, 
Lake Powell, on the border of Arizona and 
Utah, is a great spot for those who want to 
get away. 

Lake Powell is definitely the pick for 
Spring Break. Although it can get costly, it 
is definitely worth it. The scenery and sur- 
roundings could allow a tourist to explore for 
hours. It's a place where a group of friends 
can go rent a houseboat or gather all their 
camping gear and venture into the wilder- 



ness. The average cost ofthis trip can rang 
between $500 to $1000 plus, including the 
cost of food, lodging and gas. Resort lodging 
is expensive; the prices can range from $ 1 50 
to $250 a night. 

Joshua Tree or Big Bear Lake offer the 
same comforts as Lake Powell but are easier 
on the pocket. These two places are not far 
from the L.A. area, which means it's not 
going to be a long drive. There are also great 
opportunities, such as hiking, fishing, moun- 
tain biking and all around fun. Big Bear also 
offers cabins for rent, resorts and available 
campground. 

For those who are looking for the Spring 
Break party scene, the recommended places 
are Hawaii. Mexico, Texas, Florida, Las 
Vegas and Atlanta. These places are all about 
sleeping during the day and clubbing dur- 
ing the night. The most expensive places to 
stay are on the Las Vegas Strip, but if a big 
enough group goes together, it can be done. 



Staying off The Strip, in a lower-priced 
hotel, will allow a Spring Breaker to get 
more miles in for his or her dollar. Hotels 
like Best Western, Motel 6 or Holiday Inn 
cost much less. 

Mexico offers relaxing fun, beaches, 
clubs and a relaxing environment. Anywhere 
in Mexico can be a vacation spot, but some 
places to concentrate on are Rosarito, Los 
Cabos. Cancun, Cozumel and Mazatlan. The 
bulk of the cost of the trip is traveling. 

Florida and Texas offer the same perks. 
Florida is on the costly side because the only 
place to stay is at a resort. 

Finally. Atlanta is full of parties and has 
a strong urban hip-hop scene. 

Ultimately, the choice of where to go for 
Spring Break is up to you. Whether you stay 
in California, go to another state or go out 
of the country, remember there are differ- 
ent rules for different places. Wherever you 
decide to go, remember to stay safe. 



Students donate to United Blood Services 



By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writer 



The risk of identity theft didn't deter 
California Lutheran University students 
from donating their blood this past week. 
The United Blood Services truck arrived 
last Monday, uncertain how many stu- 
dents would be donating blood after the 
confidentiality scare. 

Students, along with thousands 
of donors, received a letter in early 
February notifying them about the pos- 
sibility of identity theft. In December 
2003, multiple computers belonging 
to United Blood Services were stolen 
while being repaired in Phoenix, Ariz. 
The computers contained confidential 
information including donor names, 
addresses, dates of birth and Social 
Security numbers. 

Fortunately for student donors at 
risk of having their confidential infor- 
mation accessed, Patrick McEvoy, 
executive vice president of operations 
for United Blood Services, said. "The 
records on our computers are protected 
by multiple layers of security and are not 
readily accessible." 

"We have no indication that any 



information contained on these stolen 
computers has been accessed or mis- 
used. We believe [the thieves] were after 
the hardware and not the information 
located on those computers," McEvoy 
said. 

The incident did not stop students 
from donating. Blood has a variety of 
beneficial functions, including carrying 
oxygen and other nutrients to all parts of 
the body. It also fights off infections and 
heals wounds. 

"People are donating as much 
this year as have in the past, but we 
hope everyone donates. We need more 
heroes," said Sam Brushal, a volunteer 
for the United Blood Services. 

Students may be afraid to give 
blood, but it's due to needles and not 
identity theft, according to a survey 
done by America's Blood Center. 

"I usually donate blood by my 
house, but I don't have time. So I donat- 
ed here. I'm not afraid," said sophomore 
Blanca Cortez. 

Anyone with questions or informa- 
tion concerning the theft or donating 
blodd are encouraged to contact United 

Blood Services at questions@bloodservi j un ior Stephanie Wyer drinks juice after 
ces.org or call 1-866-827-4376. donating blood. 




Photography by Bell Lope; 



The Echo 



OPINION 



March 31, 2004 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo, 

First of all, I applaud sophomore Michael 
Falcone! No offense, but finally, a letter to the edi- 
tor worth reading. Basically, Mr. Falcone expressed 
everything I have felt at my California "Lutheran" 
University experience. I do not feel one bit that my 
Christian morals have been validated or developed 
at tins school. The major reason I chose to come to 
CLU was to express and grow in my Christianity. As 
Mr. Falcone clearly indicates, this school promotes 
more un-Chnstian morals than Christian. 

I am appalled at the amount of homosexual 
marketing that the school promotes and that when 
1 did not wear a ribbon or sign the petition or go to 
the social or walk through the closet in support of 
homosexuality I was the odd man out in a Christian 
school. 1110 percent agree with Mr. Falcone. What 
kind of Christian school is this? In my opinion, this 
university has lost its Christian credibility. You have 
to walk the talk. Mr. Falcone could not have said 
it better CLU either needs to stop claiming to be 
a Christian school (Wednesday chapel and a few 
clubs do not qualify as promoting Christian mor- 
als) or start promoting the ideals it advertises. Isn't 
false advertising illegal? Ultimately, the purpose of 
this school is to promote Lutheran academia; that 
was why it was founded and a major reason why 
people donate; in other words, this school has lost 
its purpose by selling out to the politically correct 
movement. 



Anonymous 



Dear Echo, 

I read with interest the March 24 Letter to 
the Editor which denounced CLU for ostensibly 
sanctioning certain groups and practices on campus 
that the writer characterized as un-Chnstian. Well, 
I'm neither Christian nor particularly religious, so 
I cannot validly comment on the writer's assertion. 
However, for the past 23 years I have been proud to 
work for a university that seems to place tolerance 
and acceptance, as well as the celebration of diver- 
sity, ahead of the strict interpretation of religious 
tenets. 

Edward H. Julius 
Professor of Accounting 



Dear Echo: 

Wow, Michael Falcone, thank you so much 
for writing your letter to the editor last week. I didn't 
know that CLU students still misunderstood homo- 
sexuality and its position in the Lutheran church. 
Your arguments seem cold and closed-minded 
Your letter reminds me of something written dur- 
ing the Civil Rights Movement by someone who 
shunned blacks or during the women's movement 
by someone who tried to supress women. 

Yes, Mr. Falcone, you are naive. The ELCA 
Lutheran church is Christian and it is also quite 
accepting of homosexuals compared to other 
denominations of Christianity. Many ELCA 
Lutheran churches find nothing wrong with 
homosexuality. I have attended a few Lutheran 
churches that are safe havens for gays; even when 
the gay members are out of the closet, they can 
have active roles in the church. I can understand 
that some Lutherans may not have seen this side 
of Lutheranism, but finding homosexuality as anti- 
Christian is not a widespread view of the Lutheran 
church. Also, CLU has a diversity policy, encourag- 
ing a diverse student population. Thank goodness! 

I am an avid supporter of gay rights because 
nothing is wrong with homosexuality. Men can 
have stronger, more Christian, relationships with 
their boyfriends than some men have with women. 
How dare Mr. Falcone play God and pretend that he 
can judge the "Christian-ness" of homosexuality or 
the "Chnstian-ness" of CLU. 

I am proud to attend a school that has 
Harmony Week the same week it hosts Presidential 
Scholars, but I am not proud to attend a school with 
people who think of gays similarly to Mr. Falcone. 
If any of you have a problem attending a liberal 
school, please, transfer. I cringe to think that I treat 
some of you with respect when you hate gays or 
homosexuality or believe that it isn't Christian. If 
any of you arc my friends now, let me know so 
1 can treat you the same way you treat gays, like 
you aren't important enough to have the rights of a 
straight person. 

Moriah Hams-Rodger and Alex Scoble 
Communication, 2005 



Editor's Note 



Caveat emptor; 

We have foregone our regular editorial 
page in order to promote lively campus- 
wide debate concerning diversity here at 
California Lutheran University. While 
reading the following letters, please keep 
in mind that each letter represents only the 
opinion of its author. 

The Echo supports free speech and 
encourages students to participate in public 
discourse. Hence, we have here published 
the most poignant of the many letters we 
recieved last week on this topic. A vast 
majority of letters we recieved were sup- 
portive of current and future efforts to 
diversity the CLU community. In fact, we 
only recieved one letter (upper left-hand 
comer) critical of recent campus trends 
aimed at diversification. 

Currently, I have neither the inspira- 
tion nor inclination to write of the matters 
many of these letters discuss. However, for 
some reason which I fail to comprehend, 
the doomed words of outlaw journalist 
Hunter S. Thompson's echo in my mind: 
"In a closed society where everybody's 
guilty, the only crime is getting caught 
In a world of thieves, the only final sin is 
stupidity." 

Brett C. Rowland 



"Every principle is a judgment, every 
judgment the outcome of experience, 
and experience is only acquired by the 
exercise of the senses ... " 

-Marquis de Sade 

Dear Echo, 

[In response to Michael Falcone's letter of 3-24-04] First of all, I'd like to extend a big thank you for 
your letter to the editor in last week's Echo. You have helped us prove our point of why the student popula- 
tion needs to be exposed to something like Harmony Week. Let me try and help answer some of your ques- 
tions and clear up the misconceptions you have. When you applied to California Lutheran University, you 
obviously did not check your facts about the school. CLU is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church 
in America, ELCA, who accept, embrace and welcome homosexuals. This may help you understand why 
CLU has established, funded and supported the Gay Straight Alliance, GSA. 

Remind yourself that the GSA was not only in place before you started attending CLU, but that Gay 
Pride Week was established 12years before you even thought of filling out an enrollment application. Ifyou 
didn't want to apply under your assumed pretenses, then perhaps you should have read the "equal opportu- 
nity" paragraph on the application before you signed it The application clearly states, "California Lutheran 
University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, sexual orientation, marital 
status, veteran's status, national origin, or ethnic origin." This school is a big mixed salad. They don't just 
want lettuce; they want cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, croutons and more. And I have news for you! CLU 
just accepted a $400,000 diversity grant to encourage an even larger medley of students. If you wanted 
everything non-Christian to leave CLU, then you'd be asking to get rid of Sexual Responsibility Week, co- 
ed residence halls, global religion classes, the Jewish club, KCLU, Harmony Week and the list goes on and 
on. Don't these things make CLU a better place? Do us both a favor open your mind, open your heart and 
try for a minute to understand the meaning of Gay-Straight Alliance. Try and understand the meaning and 
importance of Harmony Week. Please try and understand what your letter really said to people, and what 
it says about you. Let me set you straight, no pun intended, but the definition of homophobia does include 
discrimination against homosexuality, which you clearly do. Please heal the hate, my friend. 



Sierra McGuire 
Communication, 2004 




Dear Echo, 

In response to last week's inquiries about the intentions of Harmony Week 
and the direction of this school, I would like to extend a fragment of suggestion 
with a blanket of peace and understanding. It was a concern of Mr. Falcone, as 
well as other students, I'm sure, about the agenda-of this school in its support 
over such things as the Gay Men's Chorus, Bi-Scream Social, etc. Before direct- 
ly focusing on that, though, there is a dire need to mention the fact that never 
once was it cited in the letter the contents of such events. The chorus and social 
were smaller parts of a larger whole known as "Harmony Week." The fact that 
this was not even mentioned in the letter illustrates the misconstrued argument 
of this entire issue. The heart and soul of Harmony Week is to creatively and 
peacefully shed a little light on what might otherwise be foreign to the general 
population: the life and culture of GLBT (gay/!esbian/bisexual/transgender) 
people. 

The purpose of Harmony Week is to promote tolerance and understand- 
ing among people, to educate one another through art, music, literature and 
socialization. The event is in no way tfireatening or forceful of any agenda. 
To take a single piece of that event and demean it in any way is evidence that 
the message of equality through education and tolerance has been overlooked, 
quite unfortunately. Also, there was an assumption made that the Gay Men's 
Chorus was exclusively gay and discriminates over others that do not share the 
same sexual orientation. The chorus is no more discriminatory than the LASO 
(Latin American Student Organization) is, or the BSU (Black Student Union), 
or the Marketing Club. Any individual that walks with openness to experience is 
welcome into these clubs, including off-campus organizations. There is nothing 
wrong with wanting to identify with others with similar interests as long as it 
promotes a sense of community and wellbeing. 

In respect to the fear of losing the "Christian foundation" this school might 
be subject to, no two people are the same. Every individual is as different as his 
or her opinions, morals and ideals. Within the Christian community, as well as 



any given community, there is a difference of such opinions, etc. What may be 
acceptable to one Christian may not be to another. To say this school is purely 
Christian is to flHt-out deny the other half of the students that include Buddhists, 
Gnostics, Jews, etc. Personally, despite the religious domination, 1 would be 
afraid to go to a school where 1 could not be myself This Christian Utopia men- 
tioned is narrow and unrealistic. One should take pndc that they can express 
themselves here safely and without paralyzing protest 

Take pride in the fact that we get to be exposed to different ideas, cultures, 
classes and styles. Be thankful that this is a place where you are met with smiles 
and encouragement, rather than threats and censorship. Thank God lor bringing 
together such a kaleidoscopic array of people to meet and learn from. College 
is about being exposed to fresh ideas and observing how others may view 
the world, while hopefully being open to these things at the same time. This 
school cares for its students and the precious diversity that comes with human 
nature. CLU is in no danger of losing credibility; rather it is gaining credibility 
with every event that takes place, despite its origin of support. The richness of 
this university lies within the unity of all things Christian and non-Christian. 
Diversity and education are what makes us better people at heart. 

In closing, be thankful that you are not the minority. For if such were the 
case, you might be forced to see things through someone else's eyes and be 
required to muster a bit of empathy. Try please to imagine those you may be 
hurting in your determination to prove yourself. In the instance of staying true 
to the Christian mindset, let's remember to love each other's differences rather 
than fight them. If what people do is so "wrong," then perhaps an effort to qui- 
etly forgive would be more desirable than executing an intellectual attack. Either 
way, when all is said and done, we are in this life together; so let us do our best 
to live it well in the sanction of sincerity and tolerance. 

Sarah N. Mendivel 
2004 



tEpff ffi@?gc§ 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR - 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter-Rowland 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinchart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo. California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks. CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465; 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



March 31, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



Kingsmen baseball splits week 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Above: Junior Michael Cerda strays from first base, looking lo steal second. Below: Senior 
Jake Highsmilh catches a routine fly ball in the outfield. 



Phoiogfaphs by Dan Norton 

Freshman pitcher Nathan Cusick delivers the pilch while center-fielder junior Jeremy Koe- 
nig prepares to field the ball. Cusick went five innings for the win against Westmont. 




By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writfr 



The California Lutheran University 
baseball team spilt this week as it lost to 
Hayward but was able to crush Westmont. The 
Kingsmen took on CSU Hayward in their final 
of a three-game series Sunday, March 21. The 
Kingsmen lost again to the Pioneers. 1 1-4. 

Haywarcf scored all the runs that they 
would need in the second inning. CLU did 
fight back; the team got two runs in the bot- 
tom of the ninth inning on a single hit by senior 
Ryan Hostetler. 

' Hostetler was 2-for-3 with a run scored. 
Junior Mike Cerda and junior Simon Lozano 
had two hits apiece. Sophomore Matt Hirsh 



took the loss for the Kingsmen; he gave up 
seven runs on eight hits and struck out four in 
5.1 innings. 

"It was a disappointing loss and weekend 
for us, but it was a nonconference game, so 
we are still going strong in conference and we 
hope to keep it that way," Hostetler said. 

The Kingsmen then took on Westmont 
College on Wednesday. March 24. The 
Warriors were crushed by the Kingsmen, 11- 
2. They had 1 5 hits throughout the game. 

"We expected to win against Westmont, 
and we came though. We did really well," 
senior Doug Camett said. 

Junior Roy Riley had two home runs and 
four RBIs. Four other CLU players had two 
hits apiece. Freshman Nate Cusick went five 



innings for the win; he gave up four hits and 
struck out three. 

"It was good to come back and get that 
win, especially after losing the three-game 
series against Hayward," junior Jon Calmes 
said. "We played very well." 

"We are still going 
strong in conference 
and we hope to keep 
it that way." 

Ryan Hostetler 
Senior 



Regals tennis winning streak snapped 




Senior Stepha 



Photographs by Sicphanic ShaVcr 

■: Perkins concentrates on the return. 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



The No. 18 California Lutheran 
University Regals tennis team was defeated 
by Tennessee's University of The South Tigers 
in Thousand Oaks, Calif., to break its winning 
streak on Wednesday, March 24. 

The battle, which favored the Regals 
because of higher ranking, was a definite step 



back in their season. 

The Tigers, who are ranked No. 20, 
started beating the Regals in doubles, where 
a close match gave the Tigers the early lead 
of 2-1. 

Junior Jen Hansen and senior Rebecca 
Hunau gave the Regals the only point in 
doubles by defeating Molly Willett and Laura 
Fanjoy 8-2 at No. 1. Junior Lisa Novajosky 
and sophomore Blair Murphy, playing at 
No. 2, were defeated by Lauren Willett and 
Katye Rhett 6-8, and a close tiebreaker with 
a score of 8-6 granted the second win to the 
Tigers with a win by Amy Martin and Ashley 
Logsdon against sophomore Aimee Fioree 
and senior Stephanie Perkins. 

In singles play, the situation was close, but 
the Tigers won three singles matches to clinch 
the match. No. 1 Hansen lost to L. Willett 6-2, 
6-3; No. 2 Hunau lost to M. Willett 7-5, 7-6; 
No. 3 Novajosky defeated Fanjoy 7-5, 6-2; 
No. 4 Murphy lost to Rhett 7-6, 7-5; No. 5 
Smalling did not finish her match due to lack 
of light, and No. 6 Fioree defeated Logsdon 
6-3, 6-3. The final score ended 6-3, favorable 
to the University of The South. 

"Every match was really close and could 
have gone either way. Unfortunately, there 
were some factors beyond our control that 
played a part in our loss," senior Heather 
Peterson said. 

On Thursday, March 25, the second 
Regals match of the week against the 
Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology Beavers 
was a more beneficial match for CLU. 

Throughout the match, the Regals were 
in control of the situation, beating the Beavers 



l the three doubles matches in the beginning 

No. I doubles Hansen and Hunau 
defeated Caroline Tien and Jen Hipp 9-8(4); 
No. 2 Novajosky and Murphy defeated 
Joanna Mackay; and Elaine Ni 8-2 and No. 3 
Smalling and Perkins defeated Jaclyn Cichon 
and Ruby Pai 8-3. 

"Despite our slow start, it is nice to know 
that we can play our best game and pull it out 
at the end," Perkins said. 

In singles, the only point the Beavers 
scored came thanks to Tien, who defeated 
Hansen 6-1, 4-6, 10-8. All the other singles 
matches were favorable to the Regals, 
with wins such as at No. 2, where Hunau 
defeated Hipp 7-6, 4-6, 10-6. In No. 3 singles, 
Novajosky defeated Cichon 6-2, 6-2; No. 4 
Murphy defeated Pai 6-0, 6-1; No. 5 Smalling 
defeated Ni 6-3, 6-2; and No. 6 Fioree defeat- 
ed Emily Chen 7-5, 6-2. 

With the win against the Beavers, the 
Regals move to a 12-3 record overall and 3-2 
in SCI AC. 




Photographs b) Mtphjmc shakr 
Junior Lisa Novajosky sends the balljfang over the net. 



(A (BeautifuC Look 

rull-SetA/ice Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805)492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

4II E Avenue de Los Arbnles in Thousand Oaks 



®3S3S ;Eaijc® 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



March 31, 2004 



Softball wins three out of four at tourney 




>hs by Kyle Laubach 
The Regals soflball learn gathers around its coach to discuss the positives and negatives on the field. 

23. They dropped both games, 6-4 and 2-1 . 

"We could have beaten them, but we gave 
up too many runs too early," Mitchell said. 

The Regals five-run deficit early in the 
game was just too much for the Regals in 



By Aril' Hasan 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
Regals soflball team faced Cal State Hayward 
in a double-header at home. Tuesday, March game one. 



In the second game, the deficit was 
smaller, but the battle was much tougher. 

"We were sitting on the one-run and 
just couldn't score," Head Coach Debby Day 
said. 

The Regals came home from Arizona 
in good spirits after winning three out of four 
games in the Tuscon tournament on March 26 
and 27. 

On Friday, March 26, the Regals' first 
victory was against Buena Vista, 4-3. They 
then defeated Hamiline College of Minnesota, 
15-0, and cruised in their third game against 
St. Olaf 1 1 -0. In the three victories, the Regals 
racked up a total of 48 hits. 

"We played really well. Our defense 
was flawless, and our pitching really came 
through," freshman Ashley Calendo said. 

In the three games, freshman 
Prudence Kjontvedt, junior Emily Otineru, 
senior Shannon Teverbaugh and senior Carrie 
Mitchell all batted .500. 

On Saturday, March 27, the Regals took 
on Simon Fraser and lost 0-14. 

"Their hitters were very disciplined," 
Mitchell said. The Regals sent in all four of 
their pitchers to face Simon Fraser's elite 



group of batters. 

"Not only did they hit well, but their 
pitcher had really good placement," Calendo 
said. 

With four of the next seven games being 
conference matchups, the Regals are still 
closing in on the postseason. The Regals' 
next game is a double-header against Biola 
University at Biola. 




Photographs by Kyle Laubacll 

Senior Shannon Teverbaugh fires the bail into home. 



Kingsmen tennis defeated by No. 4 Panthers 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



On Friday, March 26, the No. 12 nation- 
ally ranked California Lutheran University 
Kingsmen faced the No. 4 Middlebury 
University Panthers. The Panthers, who were 
lead by their strong doubles, got the first point 
on the board by winning two of the three eight 
game sets. 

"They were strong, but 1 think that we 
could have done a better job all around with 
doubles. For our next tough match, we need to 
be prepared," senior Junya Hasebe said. 

The match would come favorably to the 
Panthers with only one set coming in favor of 



the Kingsmen. The closest matches would be 
at No. 1 where senior Quinn Caldaron lost 6- 
1,7-5, and No. 3 sophomore Shara Surabi lost 
6-4, 3-6, 3-6. 

"We thought that we were ready to com- 
pete against this team but after this match, we 
have a lot more work to do to get anywhere in 
the conference championship that comes two 
weeks from now," sophomore Karlo Arapovic 
said. 

The score of the match ended 0-7 favor- 
able to the Panthers, but the weekend was 
not over for the Kingsmen. On Saturday, 
March 27, they faced the Westmont College 
Warriors (No. 1 1 ranked team in the country) 
in Thousand Oaks, Calif. 



After the loss the day before, the 
Kingsmen pulled away from their losing 
streak and defeated the Warriors closely with 
a score of 4-3. 

"Losing doubles against Westmont was 
an eye-opener, and we knew that we hadn't 
lost to them in a while, so we had to come back 
strong and take care of business in singles," 
sophomore Joel Wetterholm said. 

Favorable scores for the Kingsmen were 
No. 3 singles Hasebe defeating his opponent 
6-4, 6-4 and No. 6 Arapovic defeating his 
opponent 6-1, 6-0, giving the Kingsmen two 
out of their four points in this match. 



That same afternoon, the Kingsmen 
traveled to Pasadena to play the California 
Institute of Technology Beavers. The score 
came out victorious for the Kingsmen, 7-0. 

"We thought that they were going to be a 
lot weaker than usual, but it was the other way 
around. They have improved a lot since last 
year." Arapovic said. 

No. 1 J. V. Vallejos won his match 6-3, 6-2 
and No. 2 Caldaron won 6-1, 6-3, to give the 
Kingsmen two points in their sweep. 

"From here on. we need to reassess our 
goals for the season, and our goal is to beat 
Redlands in the championship to get into 
regionals," Head Coach Mike Genette said. 



Golf takes secon d in own tourney Water polo Stays afloat 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
golf team advanced to the No. 22 spot 
among NCAA Division III men's golf teams 
after placing second out of 17 teams at the 
Kingsmen Invitational with a score of 932. 
The University of Redlands place first, with its 
score of 919, and Hardin-Simmons finished in 
third place at 939. 

Each team played 36 holes on Monday, 
March 22, (18 holes in the morning and 
18 holes in the afternoon) and 18 holes on 
Tuesday. March 23. in the two-day tournament 
at La Purisima Golf Course. The Kingsmen 
shot a 309 on Monday morning, a 313 on 
Monday afternoon and a 3 10 on Tuesday. 

The Kingsmen's A-team consisted of 
junior Jason Poyser, freshman Christian 
Colunga. sophomore Peder Nyhus, senior 
Jordan Silvertrust and freshman Tyler Doyle. 
Poyser shot a 78-79-73, to finish the tourna- 
ment at 230. Colunga shot a 75-78-77 on 
Tuesday, for a total of 230. Nyhus shot a 
78-77-80 on Tuesday, totaling 235. Silvertrust 
completed the tournament with a score of 237, 
after a 78-79-80 on Tuesday. Doyle finished at 
250, with an 80-88-82. 

Freshmen Nick Vemer and David 
Stanley, sophomores Austin Aker and Michael 
Corso and junior Ji Won Lee made up the 
Kingsmen's B-team. Vemer shot an 80-78-80, 
for a total of 238. Stanley shot a 79-80-81, 



totaling 240. Aker shot a 243, 83-8 1 -79. Corso 
followed with a 26 1 , 85-84-92. Lee shot a 28 1 , 
93- 92-96. 

"It was a great tournament for our team," 
Head Coach Jeff Lindgren said. "I was really 
pleased with the way that our guys played. I 
think it's going to keep us motivated for the 
rest of the season. We found out that before 
our tournament, we were ranked No. 23 in 
the country in NCAA Division III. After our 
performance in the tournament, we should 
hopefully move up a couple spots." 

Seven schools from Texas participated in 
the tournament, along with one school from 
Oregon, CSU Hayward, Chapman University 
and all of the SCIAC teams except Whither. 

"This tournament has turned out to be a 
really good event for us because it brings out 
all the best teams," Lindgren said. "It's been 
impressive for us to play as much head-to-head 
against teams ranked ahead of us." 

Poyser finished in second place, one 
stroke behind the winner who shot 229, even 
though he and Colunga had the same score. 
Poyser won the playoff, in which whoever 
had the lowest score in the third round was 
the winner. 

Aker cited good coaching and great 
preparation by the coach as factors in the teams 
performance at the tournament. 

"We had a great tournament," Aker said. 
"The team put together a solid round on each 
of the two days. The second place finish 
should bump us up in the national rankings to 
the top 15." 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's water polo team took on Chapman 
this week. Even though the women lost, they 
showed much improvement. 

The Regals took on Chapman Universtiy 
on Saturday, March 27. They fought hard and 
were able to come close to beating them but 
not close enough; Chapman won, 13-8. In 
the last two games that they played against 
Chapman, they smoked the Regals by at 
least ten points, so they have showed some 
improvement 

"We did well against Chapman, even 
though we lost. They have great defense. I'm 
proud of how we played," freshman Kayla 
Schrock said. 

Freshman Danielle Rios scored five 



goals for the team, while freshman Mackenzie 
Faumuina scored two and freshman Scarlett 
Williams scored one. Schrock had eight saves 
in the goal. 

"We did a lot better, our offense has 
improved so much. Our confidence has also 
improved, I think that's a big thing. With our 
confidence being up, we know we will con- 
tinue to do better," Williams said. 

The team has suffered a loss of one of its 
key players; sophomore captain Kim Thomas 
broke her hand. She was injured during the 
Wagner game on March 16 and will not be 
able to return this season. 

"It's a huge loss for us; she was a key 
player. We miss having her in the water with 
us, but we cannot wait to have her back next 
season," freshman Jen Danielson said. 

The Regals' next game will be on 
Wednesday, March 3 1 , as they travel to take 
on Pomona-Pitzer. 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn S2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamn.com 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 22 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Intramural sports update. 



See story page 12 



April 21, 2004 



Features 

CLU choir performs home concert after time on the road. 



See story page 6 



Earth Day draws 
record crowd 



News 

CLU starts new Omnicron 
Delta Kappa chapter. 



See story page 4 



By Brett Rowland 
Editor In Chief 



California Lutheran University held 
its annual Earth Day celebration, drawing 
the largest crowd in the event's history to 
Buth Park last Sunday. Students participated 
in a variety of events designed to promote 
awareness of current environmental issues. 
Throughout the day, different bands took the 
stage set up in the park, playing a wide vari- 
ety of music. Notable performances included 
sets by Lara Galling, Los Abandonded and 
Summerjack. 

In addition to live music, students had the 
opportunity to make their own tie-dye shirts, 
get henna tattoos, and eat organic food from 
Trader Joe's and Whole Foods. The Green 
Party set up a booth where students could 
make their own bumper stickers and find out 
more information about the party and its 2004 
presidential campaign. 

Prior to the event, organizers headed by 
senior Jody Biergiel gathered extra clothing 
from students on campus to give away at the 




event, billing it as a free thrift store, to encour- 
age people to reuse clothing instead of buying 
new things. 

The event was organized by the Eden 
Club and sponsored by the Lord of Life 
Environmental Council. 

"[The event] was extremely successful. 
Everyone really enjoyed themselves," Biergiel 
said. "We got people to come who had never 
been to Earth Day, which was awesome." 

Earth Day was started in San Francisco 
34 years ago as a nationwide demonstration 
on behalf of the environment. In recent years. 
Earth Day has gained unforeseen popularity. 
The Seattle Post Intelligencer notes, "Earth 
Day started as a one-time show of support 
for environmental causes but has evolved 
— 34 years later — into an annual weeldbng 
event." Senior Casey Jones helps a young boy to tie-dye a shirt. Earth Day 

Similarly, CLU's annual celebration of shirts were available for purchase and tie-dye materials were provid- 
the event has grown considerably in the past edfor those who wanted them. 
years, reflecting the national trend. 

"We wanted to show people that being an 
environmentalist isn't the extreme, frightening 
thing it is often made out to be," Biergiel said. 





A table provides information 
about Hybrid vehicles. The car in 
the background was provided as 
a model for the day 



Senior Natasha Fairman helps 
sort clothes for the free thrift store 
clothing exchange. CLU students 
donated their unneeded clothing 



Junior Jamie Meyer and fresh- 
man Keith Bartlett work for 
The Need, giving out Fair Trade 
Coffee. 



A booth provides pre-typed envi- 
ronmental activist letters that 
could easily be sent to governe- 
ment and business officials. 

Photographs courtesy of Jody Biergiel 



Representatives elected to 2004-2005 PB, Senate 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



In the most competitive election to date, 
26 students were elected to the Programs 
Board and Senate for the 2004-2005 school 
year. 

Five hundred and fifty four students 
turned out to cast their votes in the ASCLU 
Spring General Elections on Tuesday, March 
30 and Wednesday, March 31. 

"Voter turnout was [the] highest ever in 
ASCLU history" ASCLU President Robert 
Boland said. 

Spring elections were so competitive, in 
fact, that some races were determined by five 
or less votes. 

"1 was thrilled with how many people 



showed up to vote," said ASCLU President- 
elect Jason Soyster. 

Soyster said that early marketing and 
word of mouth contributed to the record- 
breaking turnout. 

Juniors Courtney Parks, Brian Roberts, 
Eliz Baesler and C.J. Kridner were named 
senior Programs Board representatives. 

In addition, Micah Naruo, Meggie 
Graves, Valerie Vallejos, Kurt Sanders, 
Andrea Stenson, Michele Hernandez, Jared 
Clark, Mark Jordan and Nichole Robson were 
elected to the Programs Board. 

"I thought that the fact that so many 
people were running was exciting," Senior 
Senator Courtney Paries said. "I'm ... looking 
forward to working with other senior represen- 
tatives to plan events for seniors next year." 



Juniors Marcus Green, Jared I. Perry, 
Nick Gordon and Kellie Kocher were named 
senior senators. 

In addition. Colter Fleming, Alii Condra, 
Marissa Tsaniff, Davey Harding, Kevin Jussel, 
Jessica Placas, Autumn Molloy, Andy Treloar 
and Carly Coker were also elected as sena- 
tors. 

"A lot more people got involved in this 
[election] ... [it] was a lot different ... [there 
was] a lot more diversity ... something they'd 
been lacking," Senior Senator Marcus Green 
said. 

Green added that as a senator, he wants 
to "try to represent [the students'] voice" and 
that he wants to "be inclined to their thoughts 
and concerns." 

On Sunday, April 18, all newly elected 



officers attended a three-hour-long workshop 
on campus. 

The first hour of the workshop was 
devoted to team-building activities. 

Members of both the Programs Board 
and the Senate participated. 

The last two hours of the workshop were 
spent brainstorming. Programs Board officers 
and senators met separately to discuss plans 
for the 2004-2005 school year. 

Dunng its meeting, the Programs Board 
planned next year's Club Lu events. Similarly, 
the Senate planned projects for next year. 

In the fall of 2004, newly elected 
Programs Board representatives and Senators 
will officially take office. However, they have 
already begun to carry out their official duties. 



The Echo 



Calendar 



APRIL 21, 2004 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



today 

april 21 

Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Lord of Life Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
6:30 p.m. 

Rotaract Meeting 
Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 

april 22 

Hawaiian Club Meeting 

Apartments Lounge 
6 p.m. 



Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 

friday 

april 23 

Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Club Lu: Ice Cream Night 
SUB 

9 p.m. 




Saturday 

april 24 

Scandinavian Festival 

Kingsmen Park 
All Day 

Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Sunday 

april 25 

Scandinavian Festival 

Kingsmen Park 
All Day 

Intramural Softball 

Gibello Field 
10 a.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 

6:15 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
9 p.m. 

monday 

april 26 

ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLV-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
8:30 p.m. 

tuesday 

april 27 

Volunteer Recognition Dinner 

Nelson Room 
5:30 p.m. 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn $2800-$3S00+ forthesum 
mer working with children outdoors ! 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



International Peer Mentors 



Become a mentor to new international 
students 

Share your college experience and 
knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 12 - 30 tn 
® front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to Matj 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 

For information, call: 

luanila Pryor Hall @ (BOS) 493-395 1 

L_____. _J 



Have you ever wondered how 
buying fair trade coffee, turning 
off the lights or not wasting water 
can benefit you as well as other 
people? Come and learn how your 
SELFISH actions can be seen by 
others as UNSELFISH and why 
you should care on: 

Thursday, April 22nd 7 p.m. 
In Humanities 1 1 9. 

Quatwiu: CoUKaja @ (805) 211 -04)6. 



DISTRIBUTE BROCHURES 

Earn $375 to $560 a month work- 
ing only 22 hours a month! Pref- 
erably Monday through Friday. 
Must be available after 2 p.m. 

For more information, call: 
(866) 7-TUTORS 



classifieds 



Tutors Needed: S15-$18/hr. to start. Teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT 1 Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise 
Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required. Mail. fax. or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SATI/H, GRE. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310)282-6424 

or email resume to: 

iDStructorhiring6@acceducation.com 

Classified ads can be placed 
on the Calendar paee for a flat 
rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and clantu. 

Call: 



MULTICULTURAL 
STEERING COMMITTEE 



Leadership Positions For Students 
Who Wont To Have A Say 

(7 positions available) 
RRSPONSIBIUTIF-S: 

Give insight into Multicultural 

programming 

Decide which books & videos to add 

to the Multicultural library 

Put on campus diversity campaigns 
Participate & organize Martin Luther 

King, Jr. Chapel Service 
Evaluate Multicultural Programs Office 

Attend Multicultural events 

Generate conversations about issues 

of diversity on campus 

Applications accepted April l2-30th in the 

Multicultural Progarms Office 

Questions? Coll Amber x3323 



DEADLINE APPROACHING FOR THE: 

GRADUATION ISSUE 

[f you wad I lo send a graduation shout out or special message lo someone in I lie 

gradual ins class of 2004, then let us know! 

The following are your 'J options for submitting your message to a 2001 grail: 

I) Email it lo: eclio@clunet.edu with the subject line: "(ji adualion Issue" or 2) 

via inteiraiupus mail lo: Box 3650 or 3) drop it off @ the KCIIO office. 

Text onlj messages: S 15 Add a picture for: S:"i 

' liniailed iiutures need lo be scanned <" 100 dpi, 



Messages and payment must be received no later than April 26th. If any questions, 
contact Amanda or Roy al 1805) 493-3865. 



Re gistration Dates &Times 



Web begins at 5 p.m. & 8:30 a.m. for walk-in. 

100-110+ Credits: 

Web. Tue„ April 27 

Walk-in. Wed., April 28 
1 78-99 Credits: 

Web: Wed., April 28 

Walk-in: Thur, April 29 
58-78 Credits: 

Web: Thur, April 29 

Walk-in: Fri, April 30 
• 35-57 Credits: 

Web: Fri., April 30 

Walk-in: Mon, May 3 
15-34 Credits: 

Web: Mon., May 3 

Walk-in: Tues., May 4 
0-15 Credits: 

Web. Tues, May 4 

Walk-in: Wed, May 5 
7bfa/ credits do NOT include Spring 2004. 



The Morning Glory Staff 
invites you to the presenting of the 

2004 Morning Glory. 

Join us in celebrating the Morning 

Glory artists and thiir literary, visual 

& audio arts, at a poetry reading & 

distribution of the magazine. 

April 29th at 7 p.m. 

in the Kwan Fong Gallery 

For more information, call: 

Nicole or Jody @ x2380 or David @ 

,x230l or Dr. Wines @ x3277. 



Y 



1 
) 



" 5E THE DEFERENCE " 

(A Mentoring Program) 

Become a mentor to an Upward Bound* 

high school student 

Share your college experience and knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 1 2 - 30 tn 

@ front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to May 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 
For information, call luanila Pryor Hall @ (805) 493-3951 



1 
1 



Mini-Grant 
Opportunities 
for Fall 2004 

(Funded by (he Irvine Campus Diversity Initial 

Do you have a great idea to help improve 
our campus climate for diversity? 

The President 's Diversity Council 
& the Diversity Task Force #3 
(GLOBE) invites members of the 
CLU campus community lo apply 
for one of the $500 Campus Cli- 
mate Diversity Mini-grants. 

Mini-gram applications guide- 
lines are now available in the 
Multicultural Programs Office 
(located in the SUB). 
Need more information? 
An informational meeting will be held on 
April 30th @ 10 a.m. 
in the Pavilion or in the SUB if it rains. 
Or. call: Juanita Pryor Hall @ x395l. 



TE^f ^«W® 



APRIL 21, 2004 



NEWS 



CLU hosts events to pro- CLU promotes NLW 
mote Sexual Assault 
Awareness Month 



The Echo 3 



By Devon Bostock 
News Editor 



California Lutheran University's 
Women's Resource Center, in cooperation 
with the Coalition to End Family Violence, 
will host a series of events in recognition of 
Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Members 
of the community are invited to join the stu- 
dents in speaking out against sexual violence. 

The first event, held on April 14, was a 
women's assertiveness and self defense class. 

Denim Day: Jeans for Justice, will take 
place on Wednesday, April 21. 

CLU students will join people across the 
nation in wearing blue jeans as part of an inter- 
national protest against an Italian High Court's 
decision to overturn a rape conviction because 
the victim was wearing jeans. 

The final event will be a Take Back the 



Night rally & march on Wednesday, April 
28, in CLU's Kingsmen Park from 6:30 until 
8:30 p.m. 

This rally will include a vigil, keynote 
speakers, entertainment and resource tables. 

The evenls are sponsored in part by 
a $2,000 grant from the Marjorie Mosher 
Schmidt Foundation of Newport Beach and a 
$250 grant from the Ventura County Sheriffs 
Department. 

For more information, please call the 
Women's Resource Center at x3345. 

CLU Press Release 



Encuentros sign-ups begin 



By Dr. Jessica Ramos-Harthun 
Press Release 



Attention Faculty: 

The Transnational Classroom and 
Encuentros 2004 in joint sponsorship with 
the departments of Spanish, multimedia, 
language lab, religion and history, announce 
the upcoming video conference "Encuentros 
with the Inter-American Development Bank," 
Apnl 21, 12-1:55 p.m., in Ed Tech 139. 

The goal is to bring current cultural 
issues to the CLU community, faculty, staff 
and students alike. Other universities will 
also be tuned in, including the University 
of Alabama at Birmingham and Florida 
International University, Miami. 



Participation from the Inter-American 
Development Bank will include Anne 
Deruyttere, chief of Indigenous Peoples and 
Community Development Unit. The event 
will take about two hours, covering issues 
about indigenous peoples and the impact of 
globalization. 

Due to the limited number of seats, stu- 
dents who are more familiar with the subject 
and show high interest are encouraged to 
participate and become "reporters" to their 
classes. 

There is a sign-up sheet outside 
Humanities 224 for interested persons to 
enroll in this event 

Please contact Dr. Jessica Ramos- 
Harthun at x3435 with any questions or 
comments. 




Available at: 




/ ?*£? n £. 




The Pearson Library at California 
Lutheran University is currently celebrating 
National Library Week. The event began on 
April 1 8 and will continue until April 24. 

The National Library Week activi- 
ties were organized by Jeanette Bristol, the 
circulation services coordinator, and Nicole 
VanTilborg. 

"We want to make a stand and let people 
know that libraries are here to stay," Bristol 
said. 

National Library Week began in 1958 
and is sponsored by the American Library 
Association in association with the country's 
libraries. The week is designed to bring atten- 
tion back to libraries and the function they 
serve in society, to recognize librarians and the 
contributions they make and to make people 
aware of funding issues. 

According 
to Larra Clark, 
spokesperson for 
the ALA, funding 
for .libraries both 
public and school- 
based has been 
cut in over forty 
states, including 
California. 

"When NLW 
started, there was 
this fear that folks 
would stop read- 
ing," Clark said. 
"I think that fear 
is unfounded, but 
the goal is to get 
people to realize 
how libraries can 
help them." 

Over the 
course of the 
week, the library 
will be having 
two different 
contests that stu- 
dents can enter. 
There is "Guess 
the Number of 
Bookworms," 
and "Info Safari." 
Both are open to 
all students. 

In "Guess 
the Number of 
Bookworms," 
participants must 
guess how many 
gummi worms 
are in a jar. The 
two people who 
guess correctly, 
or the two closest 
if there are no cor- 
rect guesses, will 
win two movie 
passes each and 
will be allowed to 
split the worms. 

According 
to Bristol, the 
game has received 
good participation 
so far. 

In "Info 
Safari," partici- 
pants must go on 
a safari through- 
out the library in 
order to answer 
questions based 
on the library's 



available resources. All entrants that answer 
all the questions correctly will be entered in 
a random drawing. Two winners will receive 
$15 gift certificates to Borders bookstore. 

"The game takes some time so not that 
many people have entered yet ... I'd like to 
encourage people to come over [and partici- 
pate]," Bristol said. 

In addition to the contests the library will 
also be featuring several displays throughout 
the week featuring the resources that are avail- 
able to students. 

'Technology has had a huge impact," 
Clark said. "Most people don't know, but 
many libraries are becoming more like book 
stores. They have better lighting, comfotable 
chairs you could fall asleep in and even cof- 
fee." 

For more information on National Library 
Week, interested students may contact Bristol 
at x3252 or by E-mail at bnstol@clunet.edu. 
Information is also available on the ALA 
website, www.ala.org. 



Earn your Master's 

in Computer Science 

in just 1 5 months 



Cal Lutheran now offers an evening MSCS • 
degree program. Classes are offered 
year-round, in four 1 1-week terms: 

■ Design your course schedule to 
meet your needs 

■ State-of-the-art learning facilities 

■ Wi-Fi campus 

■ Small student-to-faculty ratio 

Choose from the following elective courses: 

■ Informatics 

■ Multimedia 

■ Database 

■ Embedded Systems 

■ Intelligence Systems 

■ Image Processing 

Accredited by Western Association of Schools and Colleges 



Learn more about Cal Lutheran's 
evening MSCS program 



Call now for 

a free 
information 

packet. 

Summer 

term starts 

May 24. 



Toll-free: 1 -888-CLU-GRAD or 805-493-31 27 

E-mail: clugrad@clunet.edu 

www.clunet.edu/mscs 



California Lutheran University 




The Echo 



NEWS 



APRIL 21, 2004 



Senate surplus CLU starts new chapter 

allocation discussed of honor society 
in recent meeting 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



By Valerie Vallejos 
Staff Writer 



Senate tackled how to use funds left 
over in its budget and discussed bills on 
reallocated Senate funds, finding a new 
school mascot and giving money to the 
newly formed Audio Arts Club at its meet- 
ing on Monday, March 29. 

The Audio Arts Club is made up of 
students interested in the recording arts and 
live sound services. Its primary purpose is 
to provide live sound services on campus. 

The big issue of the night was what to 
do with the money Senate has left over. 

"There are four options that the money 
can be used towards," Senate Director 
Jason Soyster said. 

The four options were to leave it 
to next year's Senate, build a walkway 
through Buth Park, ^donate money to the 
Capital Campaign or to divide it into other 
areas. Soyster informed the rest of the sena- 
tors that those options were not set in stone 
and that any ideas would be welcome. 

Senators were torn between leaving the 
money for next year or just spending it all 
this year. 

"If money can help tackle bigger proj- 
ects next year, then I'm not opposed to it," 
At-large Senator Dominic Storelli said. 



The question was whether or not the 
money would be spent wisely next year. 

"I don't think we should spend $1,000 
just to spend it," senior Senatoi Karen 
Thompson said. 

Junior Senator Kellie Kocher spon- 
sored a bill proposing that CLU adminis- 
tration should contract a sports manage- 
ment firm to come up with possible new 
nicknames for a mascot. Senator Kristen 
Lanning seconded the motion and Senate 
passed it unanimously. 

Kocher also sponsored a bill that would 
give the new Audio Arts Club $1,023 to 
purchase equipment. The bill passed unani- 
mously with a 16-0-0 vote. 

Storelli then sponsored a bill to real- 
locate $200 to Senate's budget, which was 
seconded by junior senator Jared I. Perry. 
The bill passed with a 1 6-0-0 vote. 

At that time, freshman Senator Kevin 
Jussel motioned to bring the Bylaw 
Amendment Proposal back to table for 
discussion. The proposed amendment was 
tabled at a previous Senate meeting pend- 
ing further review and discussion of it 
The motion failed with four in favor, eight 
opposed and four abstentions. 

Senate's final meeting of the year was 
held on Monday, April 19. 



Collegiate Readership Program 



Have you picked up your 
IM|||P]I newspaper 
today? 




USA TODAY 

Ventura County Star 

New York Times 



Monday through Friday only. 

Located in the Student Union, Dining Commons, Pearson 

Library. Soiland Humanities Center and lobbies of Morgan. 

Thompson. Pederson and Mt. Clef Resident Halls. 



Sponsored by: 

Student Life 



Please recycle. 
Thank you for your 

participation. 




|*\ NEWSPAPER 



' : 6« » - 



California Lutheran University officially 
instated its chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
The National Leadership Honor Society, by 
holding an official Tapping Ceremony on 
Sunday, April 1 8. John Morgan, the executive 
director for the honor society, conducted the 
ceremony. 

"It is really a treat to return to CLU. The 
campus is great, and the campus leadership 
has set a high standard for the future," Morgan 
said 

Omicron Delta Kappa is an honor 
society in support of student leaders and 
academic excellence. ODK was founded in 
1914 in Lexington, Va. at Washington and Lee 
University. The society has since grown to fill 
1 6 different regions across the nation, with over 
226,000 members. 

ODK is the first honor society of its kind 
to have a chapter at CLU. For over three years, 
Angela Rowley, the area residence coordina- 
tor for Thompson Hall and director of the 
Community Service Center, and Michael 
Fuller, associate dean of students, have worked 
to instate this group. Less than a year ago, the 
first members of CLU's ODK Circle formed 
and started to meet on a regular basis. 

"It is very exciting to see this whole pro- 
cess that we've been going through culminate 
in our initiation as an official circle," said 
Beckie Lewis, CLU's circle vice president. 

To be a member of this group, a student 
must be an undergraduate junior or senior who 
ranks in the upper 35 percent of his or her 
college class. In addition to this requirement, 
members must be student leaders in one of the 
following areas: scholarship, athletics, cam- 
pus community service, religious activities, 
campus government, journalism/mass media 
or creative and performing arts. CLU's Circle 
initiated 19 members, including faculty and 



advisers, on Sunday. The society will initiate 
15 new members on May 2, 2004. 

"I am really excited about the opportuni- 
ties that ODK is going to present its student 
body and community with. I think it is posi- 
tive that CLU is promoting both academic and 
leadership excellence," Marissa Tsaniff, future 
Circle member, said. 

Membership in this Circle opens opportu- 
nities for its members in the form of scholar- 
ships and grants. Also, members can make con- 
nections with other members across the coun- 
try through a program called "Campus Leaders 
Today, Community Leaders Tomorrow." This 
group helps students make connections with 
graduates in their fields of study. 

"It is really a treat to re- 
turn to CLU. The campus 
is great, and the campus 
leadership has set a high 
standard for the future." 

John Morgan 
Executive Director of ODK 

The Tapping Ceremony took place in the 
Nelson Room and was followed by a dessert 
and coffee reception. During the ceremony, 
each member was inducted by signing his or 
her name in the Circle's official member book 
and receiving his or her society pins which bear 
the ODK emblem. The officers and advisers 
were also installed 

"We are very happy to be a part of the 
inaugural membership group. It is an honor to 
be a part of this society," current ODK member 
Jon Oakman said. 

To end the ceremony, Morgan presented 
ODK Chapter President Dereem McKinney 
with the official Circle Charter that displays all 
of the names of the inaugural members. 



Correction: 

In the March 3 1 issue on page 1 , a picture caption contained an error. The picture 
captioned, "Coalition Bear bassist Quinn Breston plays as Steve Ford belts out his lyrics," 
is actually Steve Ford with guitarist Brian Wynn. Brentsoa's name was also misspelled. 



Excitement;. Adventure. 
Surprise. Thrills. __ 

This ain't your parents travel agency ...H < 




Paris $467 Madrid. ..$602 

London. ...$426 Fiji $765 

mi.mjMW.uujj.il 

i-muumi 

5 night accomm. 

LP/ CFIBO/ 

4 night accomm. 

oivtc.i.r.M. From: 



$454 



lwww.statravel.com 

7280 Mdrosa Ave IBllt NordhoPP Sc. Macodor 8ook Complex ' ! ■ ' 

(323) 934.8722 (818) 882.4692 

STUDENT TRAVEL & BEYOND 

nmmm 



Has jifflji® 



April 21. 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 5 



Are you excited about Spring Formal? 



■■> 




Jude Oni-Okpaku, business, 2005 
"No, 'cause I don't have a date." 



1 ^m *^ f 








f 



V 



Andrew Matlow. multimedia, 2006 June Lum, chemistry, 2006 Emma Palmer, accounting, 2006 

"Yea, it seems like it will be fun." "I was, but my friends didn't want to "No, because I get sea sick." 



J 






Megan Jeffery, communication, 2006 



Jessica Jones, history, 2006 



Sarah Hauer, biology, 2006 



Amanda Howie, accounting 2006 



"No, because it's too expensive, and my "No, Spring Formal seems like a high "No, it really doesn't sound like that "No, there was not enough excitement 

boyfriend lives in Arizona." school thing." much fun." built up for it." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Bell Lopez. 



Car of the Week 




Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson 

Freshman Kyle Laubach stands next to his 1998 green Chevy Tahoe. Kyle gets his ground clearance from 6 inches ofFabtech lift and 35/12.50/17 
tires. He loves to make noise either with his Flowmaster or his two Alpine S 12 inch subs. 



Think your car could 

be named 
"Car of the Week"? 

Call Kyle at X2791. 



tnpf ^eoim® 



The Echo 



FEATURES 



April 21, 2004 



CLU choir brings the sunshine back with home concert 



By Krishna Sterling 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University Choir 
ended its weeklong tour of the Midwest with 
a home concert in Samuelson Chapel Tuesday 
night at 8 p.m. The concert, done in honor of 
the end of Lent, was performed in the chapel, 
packed with family, friends, students, faculty 
and community members, all eager to hear 
the talented group. With conductor Wyant 
Morton, the group spent its Spring Break 
performing at universities and churches in the 
states of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota 
before returning to California late last week. 

The music in first half of the performance 
included "Hosanna to the Son of David" by 
Orlando Gibbons, "Quatre Motets Pour Un 
Temps de Penitence" (Four Lenten Motets) by 
Francis Poulenc, "Were You There When They 
Crucified My Lord?" and "Vamuvamba," a 
traditional Kenyan song. 

CLU senior Amy Hobden attended the 
concert with friends and all three were pleased 
with what they heard. 




Photography by Brett Rowlai 
The California Lutheran University Choir performed in the Samuelson Chapel as a 
conclusion to its weeklong tour of the Midwest during Spring Break. 



"I like the Kenyan song, with the beats 
and the movements," Hobden said. "I like 
more of the upbeat songs; even though this 
is for Lent which is a sad thing. I like they 
happy ones better like 'What A Mighty God 
We Serve."' 

After the intermission, the choir showed 
off its talents even more with songs like 



"A Song to Sing" and "Horizons," both of 
which had solos by Jaoquelynne Fontaine and 
Michael Falcone respectively. The evening of 
performances closed with "Shine on Harvest 
Moon" by the men's quartet, "Lullaby" by 
the women's quartet and finally an uplifting 
performance of "What A Mighty God We 
Serve," which received a standing ovation by 



the audience. 

Falcone is a member of the men's quartet 
and had two solos during the concert. "I loved 
singing 'Shine on Harvest Moon' so much that 
I wanted to stay up there all night. I also liked 
singing 'Horizons' because it's just incredible 
to hear the choir singing right behind me. I 
mean they just sound so good, and I was just 
really honored that 1 could do the solo for this 
choir," Falcone said. 

"I loved it," said Glenna Helms, who 
came to see her granddaughter Jessie Helms 
perform. "I like those fast ones that they sang 
and were jumping around. But I liked them all. 
I'm not that particular." 

The tour seems to have been a positive 
experience for this year's CLU choir, giving 
them strength and confidence as a group. "The 
tour was incredible," Falcone said. "It was 
very well organized, and we were like a fam- 
ily. Each day we got closer and closer to each 
other. We looked out for each other and every- 
one was full of compliments towards each 
other. Plus, the weather was nice. We seemed 
to have brought sunshine . . . that's what all of 
our hosts said." 



Beat the Spring Break blues with tips for managing time 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff Writer 



After all of that down time, relaxing and 
sleeping in late for a week straight, it is really 
hard for some of us to focus on school again. 
So what can you do? 

Next year, you can begin rehabilitation 
by looking at some of your books before the 
break is over. This means, reading them over 
and reviewing 2-3 days before school starts. 
Start with the classes that have less to review 
and move on to harder classes. Also, start set- 
ting your alarm clock to get up and prepare 



yourself for the day. 

Once you have passed this 2-3 day win- 
dow of opportunity to prevent Spring Break 
blues, there are steps to avoid struggling 
through the rest of the semester. This is called 
the 6 step over Spring Break rehab. 

First, mentally get yourself prepared. This 
means that you should tell yourself that school 
is starting back up and that you want to finish 
the semester well. 

Second, understand that if you need to 
seek some kind of help, such as tutoring, study 
groups or counseling to stay on-track, it should 
be done. Schedule weekly meetings with your 
adviser or a counselor in Student Support 



Services because its goal is to help students 
succeed in their academic careers. 

Third, take charge. If you say you are 
going to study, set time aside, without distrac- 
tions, to study. Go to the library or a place you 
know you can get work done. 

Fourth, conduct checks and balances on 
yourself. Check in with your teachers to see 
how your progress is in class. Even the simple 
things, such as having someone read over 
your papers and double-checking your work, 
can make a big difference. 

Fifth, reinforce your work with positive 
feedback. Most importantly, you should know 
that you should believe in yourself and the 



work that you do. You should never rum in 
any work with which you are not satisfied. 

The final step is to make sure to give 
yourself breaks and not to bum yourself out. 
If you give yourself plenty of time to complete 
the work, you should never feel as though you 
have to finish it right away. 

Our academic careers are as important 
as any other career that we may have in the 
future. Luckily, we are given Spring Break to 
give us a break in dealing with our academic 
careers. We must remember however that 
assigned work should be done and we should 
want to rum in the best work we can do. 



Movie Reviews 



"Walking Tall" falls flat, gets up, 
then falls again 



"Dawn of the Dead" carries on 
director's tradition 



By Jimmy Fox 
Staff Writer 



News flash to Dwayne Johnson, aka 
The Rock: a successful action film needs 
eye-popping action sequences that defy all 
rules of common physics or, enough comic 
relief moments to make the patron feel as if 
it was worth the $8.50. For the first twenty 
minutes, "Walking Tall" is a modern-day 
action movie marvel because it has neither. 

The plot is simple, too simple. Chris 
Vaughn, played by The Rock, returns to 
his tranquil, mountainside hometown after 
years of fighting for his country, only to 
discover it in shambles. Local businesses 
have closed, and casinos and adult book- 
stores are put in their replacements. Casino 
security guards are selling drugs to kids 
and, in a stroke of script writing brilliance, 
the cops are crooked. The man behind all 
the drug trafficking in the city is the casino 
owner Jay Hamilton, one of Vaughn's foot- 
ball buddies from high school. I think we 
all see where this is going. In a matter of 
hours after his return. The Rock's charac- 
ter single handedly brutalizes five casino 
workers, gets put on trial, runs for sheriff 
of the town and reunites with his old flame. 
This plot is so painfully plain it would have 
better served as an episode of "Salute Your 
Shorts" than a high budget action flick. 

Tile fight sequences, although engag- 
ing, are too few and too brief. As for the 
comedy, it is laughably non-existent. In 



fact, besides what you see on commercials, 
not one line of dialogue is laugh-out-loud 
worthy. The only laughs stem from Johnny 
Knoxville's character, who displays a mere 
fraction of the physicality that made us 
first fall in love with the "Jackass" stunt 
comedian. Yet, it is all too little too late. 
By the time the story actually gets moving, 
the audience has already been forced to sit 
through a good twenty minutes of "wel- 
come home" small talk. 

The film is disappointing and leaves 
the audience clamoring for what could 
have been. No doubt. The Rock gener- 
ates enough on screen electricity to light 
up the Vegas strip. Knoxville is a proven 
crowd pleaser with untapped comedic 
potential, and Neil McDonough, the film's 
villain, is a seasoned dramatic actor. This 
film, like "Gigli," proves that star power 
is not enough. Given some help from the 
writers, "Walking Tall" could have been 
an entertaining picture. After starring in 
such high concept action films as "The 
Scorpion King" and the much better "The 
Rundown," it is a wonder to me why The 
Rock would have pursued a script that was 
so obviously a step backward. Whereas his 
earlier works were Schwarzeneggeresque 
efforts. "Walking Tall" leaves the audi- 
ence with a Stephen Seagal-like taste in its 
mouth. That is not good. 

Unless you have friends working at 
the theater or a buddy holding the exit door, 
don't waste your time driving to the theater 
to see this. 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



Like a shotgun blast from the hip. 
"Dawn of the Dead" completely owned 
me. Being the overzealous zombie/ 
George A. Romero fan that I am, I was 
in the theater opening weekend. I wasn't 
expecting all that much from this flick. 
Seeing as how Romero wasn't involved 
in the remake, and how Hollywood has 
a penchant for butchering originals (no 
pun intended), I was hoping to walk 
out of the theater somewhat content. 
Well, I have to hand it to director Zack 
Snyder and cast. They did an excellent 
job. While I was watching the remake, 
I had a sense that those involved in the 
flick truly appreciated the undead (check 
the cameos by Tom Savini, and original 
"Dawn of the Dead" actor Ken Foree). 
"Dawn of the Dead" doesn't aspire to be 
"Citizen Kane;" the protagonists know 
they are carrying on in the Romero tra- 
dition. 

The casting for the film was quite 
stellar. Like all of Romero's zombie 
flicks, there is a diverse juxtaposition of 
personalities found in the remake. There 
is also no set back on hiring extras (check 
the "Jay Leno" sniper scene), which had 
always put a halt on some of the scenes 
Romero wanted to do for his originals. 
That said, this wasn't a Romero film. 
Some of the genius (yeah, I said genius) 



the Living Dead," "Dawn of the Dead," 
"Day of the Dead"), came from budget 
cuts. There was a lot of unorthodox 
improvisation and ingenuity, spawned 
from a cast and state (Pennsylvania) that 
believed in, and loved, Romero's films. 

I hear laypeople talking trash about 
the original, saying the remake was bet- 
ter. Quite honestly, I am appalled by 
that notion. I am a big advocate of the 
remake, but the original is untouchable 
(the London Calling, if you will, of zom- 
bie movies). 

1 do have two major problems with 
the "Dawn of the Dead" remake. Beef 
number 1 (and it is a major one): zombies 
do not run. 1 have seen zombies before; 
they are slow. Undoubtedly, atrophy 
sets in early in the undead which would 
inhibit any sort of running motion (check 
any one of Romero's films for further 
evidence). Beef number 2: zombies do 
eat other animals. There is a scene in 
the remake where, "Chips," a dog, runs 
across a sea of zombies to the aid of a 
character in a far-off building. In real life. 
Chips would have been some Zombie's 
lunch (check the fantastic 1990 "Night 
of the Living Dead" remake). Those two 
flaws aside, the remake is pretty lethal. I 
wholeheafledly recommend it. Just make 
sure to check out the original on DVD, 
"Rites of Springs Discord" anthology 
and George Romero's "Martin." 



Hjqs 1£<BM<B 



April 21, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 7 



CLU band "Pacific Element" perform for hundreds of students 



By Alex Mallen 
Special to the echo 



Pacific Element, a band made up 
of four California Lutheran University 
students, has developed quite a follow- 
ing of other CLU students. The band has 
performed four times on campus, includ- 
ing Play for Pay, The Need, Jam Fest, 
and this past Sunday for Earth Day. It 
has also taken its show beyond Thousand 
Oaks, Calif, by performing at Claremont 
College this past February. This was the 
first time that the band performed at a 
venue outside of CLU. The performance 
attracted approximately 300-400 college 
students at the college's "HUB," similar 
to The Need. 

Pacific Element, influenced by The 
Dave Mathews Band and Dispatch, placed 



second at Play for Pay after having prao 
ticed only once prior to the event. The four 
CLU juniors, Kyle Paterik, Adam Jussel, 
Nick Paul and Mike Judd, are hoping to 
travel to various Southern California col- 
leges and universities to get the band's 
name out, beyond CLU. They have been 
contacting a number of schools in hopes of 
performing for a variety of audiences. 

This CLU band has written 10 songs 
and has recorded a three-song demo CD 
to hand out for free at performances. 
However, its self-described biggest fan, 
junior Craig Herrara, has had the opportu- 
nity to hear the band more than most other 
Pacific Element followers. 

"I hear it from start to finish," he said. 
"From the writing of the lyrics to the fin- 
ished product that they perform at shows. 
I love it." 

The band describes its music as 



"acoustic rock" and "college under- 
ground." Both of these types of music 
are currently very popular among college 
students, and the band is hoping to take 
advantage of this by booking free perfor- 
mances at such schools as the University 
of La Veme, Pepperdine and University of 
California, Santa Barbara. 

Although the band is planning to 
record its first full-length CD in the CLU 
studio in the near future, lead vocalist 
Paterik, 21, is just happy to be doing 
something that he loves. 

"I am just here to have a good time 
and do something different that I haven't 
done before," he said. 

The lead guitarist, Jussel, 21, would 
love to see the band continue to grow but 
understands that they are just starting out. 

"We are four friends having a good 
time," he said. "We don't know where it's 



going, but we are excited about how far we 
have gotten having only been together for 
a short time." 

The band's drummer, Judd, 20, is the 
only member of the group with previous 
band experience, having been in several 
bands in high school. 

"It's different now. The four of us 
have chemistry, and it really feels like 
a real band," he said. "We have certain 
goals. But right now, we are just taking it 
one song at a time." 

All four band members are surprised 
with all of the positive reactions they have 
received from CLU students. Now they are 
excited to take their music beyond CLU. 

To leam more about Pacific Element 
or to receive a free demo CD, visit 
pacificelement.cjb.net on the web or e-mail 
the band at pacificelement@yahoo.com. 



Switzerland punk band "LiLiput" is old but still good 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff Writer 



LiLiput, one of the best and most 
underrated bands of the post-punk era, 
has proven itself to be as vital as fellow 
luminaries The Clash, Wire and The Fall. 
Finding a band as innovative as LiLiput 
during its five-year run from'78-*83 
proves to be rather difficult. With no 
concern for commercial success, LiLiput 
remained an anomaly, happily tucked 
away in its homeland of Switzerland. 
While hints of the Clash's fixation with 
social concerns affecting youth culture 
can be found in LiLiput's music, it takes a 
whole different slant. The reason: LiLiput 
was a completely self-contained female 
band except for a brief period. While 
this might seem rather commonplace 



now, it certainly wasn't in 1978 when 
the band formed. Mixing feminist lyrics 
with the minimalist art-punk of Wire and 
vocal deliveries reminiscent of The Fall's 
Mark E. Smith, LiLiput predated the riot 
"grrrl" movement of the early '90s by 13 
years, which explains why Kill Rock Stars 
recently made LiLiput's catalogue easily 
available for the first time. 

The band suffered numerous lineup 
changes during its brief, supernova, exis- 
tence. However, permanently at the helm 
of LiLiput remained guitarist Marlene 
Marder and bassist Klaudia Schiff. Like 
so many punk bands, LiLiput had no 
musical experience prior to its formation. 
Nevertheless, the band's musicianship 
excelled rapidly, from its all down picking, 
two chord beginnings to its later incorpo- 
rations of such instruments as accordion 
and saxophone, unorthodox for punk. The 



element that never changed as the band 
developed was its penchant for experi- 
mentation and disregard for conventional 
song writing and structure. 

LiLiput's songs unexpectedly change 
pace at the drop of a dime. These unex- 
plainable tempo changes prove rather 
refreshing, considering the music-by-num- 
bers approach punk was taking then. 

Tempo changes and proto-riot "grrrl" 
isn't all LiLiput has to offer. The group 
made its own songwriting rules. Switching 
from English to German mid-song, the 
band knew no boundaries. Occasionally, 
LiLiput spoke in its own made up dia- 
lect, as heard in "Split," "Hotch-potch, 
Hugger-mugger, Bow-wow, Hara-kiri, 
Hoo-poo". What is even more impressive 
is that LiLiput unpretentiously made all 
this work. 

So, why am I writing about LiLiput. a 



band that has been disbanded for over 20 
years, now? Simple. LiLiput is as relevant 
now as it was in the dawn of the '80s. It's 
unconventional attitude still inspires and 
sounds refreshing. And unlike other trail- 
blazers, such as the Velvet Underground, 
LiLiput never signed to a major label. 
There is no chance of LiLiput joining 
the ranks of a 20th century masters com- 
pilation. In fact, for many years the only 
way to receive any of LiLiput's music 
was by sending $30 to a record label in 
Switzerland. The band called it a day 
when they simply put down their instru- 
ments and picked up paint brushes. It been 
said that Kill Rock Stars is paying a musi- 
cal debt by re-releasing LiLiput's all too 
short catalogue. This review is the least I 
could do. 



Tips for handling graduation 



By Farima Nojoumi 
Special to the echo 



For you seniors, who are counting down the days until graduation, don't for- 
get the steps to ensure a smooth process. All of your dedication has paid off and 
now you can celebrate your success by enjoying these senior activities. Here 
are some suggestions from the undergraduate brochure for CLU: 

Three steps to ensure a smooth degree process: 
•Review your senior audit. 
•Make sure all coursework is completed. 
•Pay the application for degree fee. 

For all of those late nights that you spent in the library, dorm rooms or study 
groups, it's time that your hard work is rewarded. Your dedication and com- 
mitment to your college career has come to an end. It's the beginning of a new 
chapter in your life. 

Graduation with honors include: 

• Cum Laude- minimum grade point average of 3.4 

• Magna Cum Laude- minimum grade point average of 3.6 

• Summa Cum Laude- minimum grade point average of 3.8 

Senior graduation activities: 

• Friday, April 23, 2004: Senior information meeting 

• Friday, April 30, 2004: Honors Day Convocation/ Honors Banquet 

• Sunday, May 2, 2004: Senior cap and gown party 

• Thursday. May 6, 2004: Senior banquet 

Commencement on May 15, 2004: 

• Baccalaureate in the Chapel at 8:30 a.m. 

• Gates open for Commencement in the Mount Clef Stadium at 9:30 a.m. 

• Commencement lineup in the Mount Clef Stadium at 10 a.m. 

• Undergraduate Commencement in the Mount Clef Stadium at 10:30 a.m. 

• Commencement reception in Kingsmen Park at 12:00 p.m. 

• Graduate Commencement in the Mount Clef Stadium at 2:00 p.m. 



The English department 

presents "An evening at 

Overton" on Tuesday, April 27 

at 8 p.m. in Overton Hall. 

Come hear your favorite poets 

read poems, enjoy the free food 

and meet the sunrise guests. 



!A (Beautiful Look 

Pull-Service Hair Salon for Men &■ Women 

(805)492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 

call. 

May not be combined with any other offer. 

41 1 E. Avenue de Los Arboles in Thousand Oaks 
Near Rile Aid and Whole Foods 



8 



The Echo 



OPINION 



April 21, 2004 



Three strikes for corporations 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



Access, the Echo 
online at: 



wwwxl 
ec 



unet.edu/ 
cno 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



The Supreme Court decided, 118 years 
ago, that under the Fourteenth Amendment, 
corporations should be treated as individu- 
als. This resulted in lower taxes for corpora- 
tions and enabled them to sue and be sued. 
Despite this decision, corporations are still 
not treated as people, in this month's issue 
of "Adbusters," the magazine's editorial staff 
called for new legislation that would make 
corporations subject to the ''three strikes and 
you're out" law. They propose, "We begin 
revoking the charters of all corporations who 
break the law three times." 

It is time to punish corporate crime. In 
order to protect investors, the environment and 
employees, we need to implement more strin- 
gent penalties for corporations found breaking 
the law. Fines have not been effective. Many 
corporations have discovered that it is less 
expensive to pay fines than change the way 
they do business. This is to be expected con- 
sidering that some companies make millions in 
profit and pay thousands in fines. Furthermore, 
laws should be harsher for companies that are 
awarded government contracts. As taxpayers, 
we should require that corporations be banned 
from doing business with the government if 
they violate environmental laws, overcharge 
the government or are found to be involved in 



fraudulent business practices. 

Corporations such as Bechtel, the world's 
largest civil engineering firm, have been prof- 
iting for too long at the expense of taxpayers 
and the environment (Never heard of Bechtel? 
That's because the company values secrecy 
more than the National Security Agency). 
The Bechtel Corporation, formed in 1925 
by former muleskinner Warren Bechtel, was 
awarded its first government contract in 1926 
to build the Bowman Lake Dam in California. 
Since then, the company has worked on many 
government projects including: the Hoover 
Dam, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, 
the failed CANOL oil pipeline in Alaska, the 
Trans-Arabian pipeline in Saudi Arabia, the. 
world's first nuclear power plant in Illinois, 
BART, the Big Dig project in Boston and the 
construction of an entire city, Jubail Industrial 
City, in Saudi Arabia. 

The corporation has a long history of 
unquestionable business practices. Bechtel 
came under attack during the final years of 
World War II, after several allegations of 
wartime profiteering and corruption, most of 
which stemmed from the failed CANOL oil 
pipeline in Alaska. The pipeline was to be 
constructed in order to prevent the Axis from 
gaining control of the world's oil reserves. 
After 1 1 months and $143 million in taxpayer 
money, the project was abandoned, and it was 
concluded that the pipeline consumed more oil 
than it produced. Strike one. 

In 1972, Bechtel was awarded a $13 bil- 
lion contract for the James Bay hydroelectric 
project. Before the project was completed, 
several environmental groups had filed charg- 
es against the company for violating several 
environmental laws. Strike two. 

In 2003, an investigation conducted by the 
Boston Globe into the Bechtel Corporation's 



work on the Big Dig project revealed enor- 
mous cost overruns and accounting abnormali- 
ties that totaled $1 billion. Strike three. 

In May of 2003. the New Yorker ran 
an article which presented evidence that the 
bin Ladin family invested $10 million in 
The Fremont Group, formerly called Bechtel 
Investments and still owned by the Bechtel 
Corporation. Last year, despite all of the above, 
Bechtel was awarded a $680 million contract 
to rebuild water treatment and distribution 
facilities and a variety of other projects in Iraq. 
Last month, Bloomberg.com reported that 
Bechtel gave $26,501 to the George W. Bush 
re-election campaign, but was beat out by 
Washington Group for a number of lucrative 
rebuilding contracts in Iraq. On April 6 and 7, 
the Washington Group donated $27,750 to the 
Bush campaign, more than Bechtel donated all 
year, and was subsequently rewarded with 4 
reconstruction contracts totaling $2.5 billion. 
The contract loss comes as a surprise consid- 
ering that President Bush recently named the 
current Bechtel Corporation CEO, Riley R 
Bechtel, to his Export Council. 

Corrupt corporations should not be given 
billion dollar contracts because of the amount 
of money they donate to the president. It is time 
for taxpayers to demand greater accountability 
from their representatives and the corporations 
to which those representatives give contracts. 
Bechtel has already made three mistakes and 
should no longer be able to work for the U.S. 
government. Students interested in protecting 
the government and the proper use of their tax 
dollars can visit www.corporate3strikes.com. 

Note: Much the historical informa- 
tion on the Bechtel Corporation used in this 
article was complied from Mark Dowie's 1978 
Mother Jones article, "The Bechtel File." 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo, 



Congratulations goes out to who ever was in charge of placing free 
newspapers around campus. Besides the snazzy new stands, it is quite 
exciting to be able to pick up a New York Times and read it from the 
comfort of my own couch. 

When I came to California Lutheran University as a freshman, I 
recall being painfully aware of the college "bubble" in which we lived, 
absorbed by our own activities, classes and dorm life. While learning 
about Aristotle is important, it seemed current affairs were put on the 
back burner. 

Thank you for trying to keep students informed about the past and 
the present 



Jody Biergiel 
Senior 



Dear Echo, 

The letters that were published in the ECHO on March 31, 2004 
seem to indicate that if someone opposes homosexuality on the basis 
of religion, or other reasons, it means that that person is prejudice or 
discriminatory towards homosexuals. I would like to point out that 
there are those of us who do not support homosexuality, but who do not 
discriminate towards homosexuals. 

Let me start off by saying that I am not Lutheran, so 1 have no 
opinion about how the Lutheran church handles homosexuality. I was, 
however, raised in a Christian household and consider myself to be a 
strong Christian. I believe that the Bible speaks out very strongly against 
homosexuality. In a letter submitted by Moriah Harris-Rodger and Alex 
Scoble, they wrote that one cannot "play God and pretend that one can 
judge the 'Christian-ness' of homosexuality." 



Please see LETTER, p. 9 



gjggt ffiOIffC® 



Brett Rowland 
EDITOR IN CHIEF/OPINION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvene Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny lngwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter-Rowland 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehan 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Horn 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Dr. Druann Pagiiassoni 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465: 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



{&3H?S 5«3S® 



April 21, 2004 



OPINION 



The Echo 9 



Letter to 
the Editor 



Cont'd from LETTER, p. 9 

They are right, we cannot play God, but we 
can see what God has to say about homosexu- 
ality by reading the Bible. 

Leviticus 18:22 says, "Do not lie with 
a man as one lies with a woman; that is 
detesable." If the Old Testament isn't your 
thing, the New Testament has something to 
say as well. 

Corinthians 6:9-10 says, "Do not be 
deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor 
idolaters nor adulterers nor male prostitutes 



Job market bleak for grads. 



"Even though I believe 
that homosexuality is 
wrong, I have several 
friends who are 
homosexual." 

Brenna Sandeen 
Senior 



nor homosexual offenders ... will inherit the 
kingdom of God." Other versus include 
Leviticus 20:13 and Romans 1:18-27. 

The Bible, however, also commands us 
to love our neighbor and to do unto others as 
we would have done unto us. This means that 
as Christians, we have an obligation to treat 
everyone with kindness and respect. It is not 
our job as Christians to judge one another's 
sins. That job is, thankfully, left up to God, 
who is full of mercy and grace. Even though 
I believe that homosexuality is wrong, I have 
several friends who are homosexual. They 
know where I stand on the issue, but they also 
know that they can come to me for respect, 
kindness, love, and friendship. The issue of 
homosexuality is one that will continue to 
cause strife within our society. I just want 
people to know that it is possible to disagree 
with homosexuality but also respect everyone 
and treat people with dignity. 

Brenna Sandeen 
History, Senior 




By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



In Parade's annual "What People Earn" 
issue, the publication brings to light a disheart- 
ening but real issue facing our nation today: 
despite stable economic growth, our job mar- 
ket is still struggling. 

First of all, the good news: national 
productivity is high, inflation is low, corpo- 
rate profits are up, and the stock market has 
rebounded. All of these are tell-tale signs of 
economic recovery. 

However, experts say that growth in the 
economy cannot be sustained without "robust 
job creation" and rising wages, neither of 
which looks promising in the near future. 

Since 2001, the nation has lost 2.3 million 
jobs. As a result, job creation has been weaker 
than in any economic recovery since 1945. 
In 2003, nearly 22 percent of the 9 million 
Americans out of work were unemployed for 
six months or longer. That is the highest level 
in 20 years. In addition, almost 4.5 million 
people worked part time because they were 
unable to find a full-time permanent position. 

Granted, job creation did pick up slightly 
last August, but the morale of many job seek- 
ers is still waning. According to U.S. govern- 
ment data, when unemployment rates fell last 
December from 5.9 percent to 5.7 percent, it 
was simply because many job seekers gave 
up looking. 

Taking those individuals into account, 
that means nearly 12 percent of the nation's 
labor force is unemployed or underemployed 
That number could possible be higher consid- 
ering it does not take into consideration those 
who deem themselves "self-employed." 



That is a staggering number, to say the 
least, and calls for some immediate attention 
as far as our government is concerned. In order 
to make a significant difference in unemploy- 
ment, experts say that at least 200,000 jobs 
must be created a month on a consistent basis. 
This is a startling and seemingly unattainable 
statistic. 

And the sad truth is, we may not see 
improvements for some time. Experts predict 
that we will not see much advancement until 
at least 2005. 

"Job creation in America is in the base- 
ment," said Sen. Ted Kennedy. "Last month, 
the economy created only one new job for 
every 390 out-of-work Americans, and not one 
of those new jobs was a private sector job." 

Kennedy has publicly criticized President 
Bush's comments that he would create approx- 
imately 4 million jobs by the end of 2003. 

"The nation lost 1.9 million jobs 
instead," said Kennedy, of 2002 figures. As 
for 2003, nearly 300,000 more jobs were lost. 
Additionally, for the new jobs created, workers 
received 2 1 percent less pay. The median sal- 
ary last year was just over $32,000. 

In stark contrast, however. CEO's of large 
companies now average more than $10 mil- 
lion a year in total compensation. Real estate 
mogul Donald Trump earned approximately 
$100 million in 2003 alone. 

To top it off, their median cash bonus 
alone was $605,000, a 26 percent jump over 
2002. For many who are simply trying to stay 
afloat, that figure may seem like a ridiculous 
amount of money. 

In today's tough job market, it is no 
surprise that many college graduates are defer- 
ring the work force for graduate school, which 
explains the rise in unpaid internships and in 
applications to public service programs like 
the Peace Corps. 

Around 42 percent of employers sur- 
veyed by the National Association of Colleges 
and Employers say they expect to cut college 
hiring this year, while 36 percent said they plan 
to hire new college graduates. 

Overall, employers expect to keep their 
levels of hiring new college graduates steady 
this year compared to last. But consider that 
hiring of new grads dropped 36 percent last 



year from the previous year, which still implies 
a continued hiring slump for many graduates. 

However, some grads are faring bet- 
ter than others. Business majors are doing 
relatively better than some of their liberal arts 
counterparts. Although some reports say hinng 
of students with MBA degrees will improve 
this year, many say recruiting is still slow for 
those with these advanced business degrees. 

"The general thought was that the gradu- 
ating class of 2002 had seen the worst," said 
Mel Penn, president of the MBA Career 
Services Council, which represents career 
counseling professionals from 240 business 
schools. 

But the continued recession, along with 
the war in Iraq, has made many employers 
cautious about hiring new workers. Now, 
new graduates not only have to worry about 
competing with each other, but also competing 
with MBAs who graduated last year, as well 
as people with much more experience who've 
been laid off during the recession. 

Despite the discouraging outlook for 
college grads, career counselors say there are 
ways for students to get their foot in the door. 
One of the most important is through intern- 
ships. 

Nearly 70 percent of companies reported 
making job offers to their companies' own 
interns before even interviewing other candi- 
dates. In 2002, almost 50 percent of new hires 
ultimately came from recruiters' own intern 
pools. 

Regardless of what field you work in, it is 
always beneficial to start early. Internships lead 
to a foot in the door that, in coming years, may 
remain shut to those outside the company. 

Career counselors also stress the impor- 
tance of networking. Just because companies 
aren't out actively seeking new workers 
doesn't mean jobs aren't out there, and being 
in the right place at the right time can make a 
big difference between getting hired and being 
on unemployment. 

After all, it's a small world. You might as 
well use it to your advantage. 



An alumna's opinion on homosexuality 



By Simone Rizkallah 
Special to the Echo 



As an alumna and a person who cares 
about the future of her alma mater, I fell com- 
pelled to submitt this missive to the Echo. The 
debate about whether or not CLU should be 
funding organizations like Gay-Straight 
Alliance gbes beyond political affiliation or 
where your sympathies lie regarding the gay 
movement. 

This is really about intellectual honesty. 
There is one thing all un-apathetic students 
can agree on, and that is we care about 
this issue in our attempt to create a better 
world for our children. On that note, I shall 
attempt to clarify this issue. First, why be 
a Lutheran? Obviously those who hold 
Lutheran beliefs believe their convictions and 
their way of living is preferable to other ways 
of living and believing, since they choose to 
align themselves accordingly. 

Second, do Lutherans claim to be 
Christians? My knowledge base affirms 
that Lutherans are, indeed, Christians. Do 
Christians under the Lutheran denomina- 
tion believe that the Christian Bible is the 
inspired word of God? As far as I know, 
yes it does. What does the Christian Bible in 
both the Old and New Testament say? There 



are several passages that warn the believer to 
abstain from homosexual behavior. Here is 
one of them from Leviticus (20:13), but you 
can also check out Corinthians: "If a man lies 
with a male, as he lies with a woman, both of 
them have committed an abomination. They 
shall surely be put to death. Their blood shall 
be upon them." If the ELCA supports homo- 
sexual behavior, then it should re-think its 
commitment to Christianity and the Christian 
Bible. Homosexual behavior is a sin accord- 
ing to the Bible, just like fomicatioa murder, 
adultery and so forth. Now we have clarifiecf 
that homosexual behavior, not "being" gay is 
a sin. So what is the harm in supporting the 
GSA? The problem is that, and now I am 
assuming, so forgive me {I'm not being sar- 
castic) if I am wrong in assuming this, I doubt 
members of GSA are holding meetings dis- 
cussing the difficulty of living with this burden 
and talking about lifelong celibacy. I doubt 
they are discussing the revolting decision of 
the American Psychiatric Association's lack of 
support for reparative therapy for homosexuals 
who are trying to receive treatment 

Therapists are denying hundreds of gay 
people who have outwardly stated that they 
want to receive treatment. As a person who 



feels that a diversity of options should be 
presented, I am outraged. Homosexuality, 
thus far, has no scientific explanation and as 
a result should not be treated as such. The 
reason the APA has taken this stance is due 
to pressure from gay lobbyists, but no scien- 
tific issue should be treated differently over 
another. Science is an objective field 

I assume the APA gave in to the pressure 
because it does not want to hurt feelings. Sci- 
entific research should not involve feelings, but 
I can understand, not accept, it. I have many 
gay friends. I have many straight friends. It 
isn't easy for me to be open about my feelings 
on homosexual behavior. Furthermore, it isn't 
easy for me to tell my straight friends they are 
sinning when they engage in pre-marital sex. 

Then again, it isn't easy being a 
Christian. Christ never said it would be. If 
you are looking to your Christianity to find 
a comfort zone, you are looking in the wrong 
place. While God will provide consolation to 
those who are persecuted, despite their love for 
the people they are seemingly against ("love 
the sinner, hate the sin" as the saying goes), 
Christianity that has become a "feel good 
drug" has lost its purpose and mission. 

The argument that if CLU wants to be 



truly Christian, it should remove the Jewish 
club and so forth from its campus is invalid. 
Christianity does not consider Jewish-ness and 
those practices that make someone distinctly 
Jewish to be sinful.which brings me back 
to CLU. What does the Christian identity 
mean to this school? What role will Christ 
play? Chnst told the adulteress who was 
about to be stoned, "You are forgiven. Go 
and sin no more." God has enough love for 
everyone. Christians can agree on this and 
this is why all people are welcome to attend 
CLU. But the important message in this 
parable is "Go and sin no more." Is that the 
agenda of the GSA? 

If it is, and I am ignorant of it, then none 
of this matters and this is a non-issue. But if 
it is not, if it seeks to normalize homosexual 
behavior by its events, then I think Michael 
Falcone makes a good point in his article about 
what the true mission of CLU ought to be. 

I assume CLU wants its Lutheran name 
to have validity and truly mean something; 
but does it? And if CLU decides to make 
the acceptance of all its main purpose, then I 
truly hope that the Echo and the good students 
of CLU are more open-minded to politically 
diverse opinions, namely, conservatism. 



®H5S liffljt© 



10 



SPORTS 



April 21, 2004 



Ruthless Regals snatch four wins in a row 




By Anf Hasan 
Staff Writer 



Photograph by Dan Norton 
Junior Heidi Miller hits a ground ball through the infield Miller wemfow-for-four al the plale against Pomona. 

of their games played last week. Last week 
began with a doubleheader against Hope 
International on Wednesday, April 14. The 
Regals came out on fire, winning the first 
game 12-7 and the second game 4-2. Senior 
Carrie Mitchell drove in two runs and scored 
three runs, while teammate sophomore Olivia 
Chacon pitched a complete game to help the 



With only four games away from fin- 
ishing the season, the California Lutheran 
University Regals Softball team was not 
taking any games lightly, winning all four 



Regals defeat Hope International. 

"We know how important these last few 
games are, and everyone stepped up and came 
ready to play," Mitchell said. 

The Regals returned home Friday, April 

16, to take on Pomona Pitzer in a conference 
game. They beat them 9- 1 , and improved their 
record to 6-5 in conference and 14-17 overall. 
Mitchell and junior Heidi Miller both went 
four-for-four at the plate. 

"With only a few games left, these con- 
ference games are a must-win for us," Head 
Coach Debby Day said. 

The Regals hosted Colorado College on 
Sunday, April 18 and won 14-1. Freshman 
Ashley Calendo pitched her first home victory 
pitching all five innings, giving up only one- 
run off of one hit. With Calendo leading the 
defense, sophomore Gianna Regal started the 
Regals offensive attack with a two-run home 
run in the first inning. Senior Emily Otineru 
almost completed the cycle with a single, a 
double and a triple. She also scored three times 
and drove in five runs. 

All nine Regal starters reached base 
safely at least once. The game was called after 
4.5 innings of play because CLU's lead was 
larger than ten. 

With that win the Regals improved to 1 5- 

17. They then had a make-up doubleheader 



against Pomona Pitzer on Monday, April 19. 
Scores for this game were not available at 
jress time. 




Photograph by Dan Norton 
Senior Carrie Mitchell prepares to steal second base. 



Kingsmen past comes back to haunt 



"Our guys competed as 
if their life depended on 
it with tremendous team 
spirit. We just have to keep 
our hopes alive." 

Mike Genette 
Head Coach 

By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 

On Friday, April 16, the California 
Lutheran University men's tennis team 
entered into the end of the season with 
the SCIAC championships hosted by the 
University of Redlands. 

The Kingsmen, who were seeded third 
in the tournament, faced the Occidental 
College Tigers on Friday at 8 a.m. 

The score, which came favorable to the 
Kingsmen, 4-0, was a quick start to get the 
weekend under way. The teams would only 



play up to four points since that is a declared 
win for any team. 

Doubles, led by junior Quinn Caldaron 
and partner Joel Wetterholm, earned the first 
point for the Kingsmen. Karlo Arapovic 
and partner J.V. Vallejos also won at No. 2 
doubles, making it an immediate win in the 
doubles fraction of the match. 

"We just wanted to get this match fin- 
ished and then play Redlands. Occidental 
was not a big bump, but, yet again, we had 
to cruise through them quickly and begin a 
good focus for the match after it," Caldaron 
said. 

The Kingsmen raced to get the three 
extra singles points on the board. These 
three points came with quick wins by No. 4 
player Junya Hasebe defeating his opponent 
Sean Wong 6-2, 6-0; No. 5 player Ben Staley 
defeating his opponent Sam Sinkin 6-1, 6-2 
and No. 1 Caldaron defeating Brett Baker 
6-2, 6-0. 

After these matches were over, all other 
matches were stopped due to the automatic 



win, and teams were sent to the next round. 

The Kingsmen faced the hosting team. 
University of Redlands Bulldogs, who had 
defeated the Kingsmen on every meet this 
year. The outcome in the tournament was 
the same as in season. 

The Bulldogs defeated the Kingsmen 
6-1. The only win that the Kingsmen came 
up with was when No. 4 Hasebe defeated 
Ashwin Bhargava 6-4, 6-2. 

The only other significant score is the 
close loss at No. 2, during which Vallejos 
lost to Michael Thoeresz 1-6, 6-1. 6-1. 

Losing to the Bulldogs meant that the 
Kingsmen would drop the immediate possi- 
bility of going to Nationals since they would 
not be ranked in the top of the region. 

"It is disappointing to know that we 
have a smaller possibility of going to 
Nationals. Last year we made it, and it was a 
good experience for all of us as a team, but 
we will keep our heads up and wait and see 
if we get to go," Hasebe said. 

The loss on Friday meant the Kingsmen 



had to play for the third spot in SCIAC on 
Sunday. Rain prevented the teams from play- 
ing all day Saturday. 

The Kingsmen came out victorious to 
snatch the third spot from the Pomona Pitzer 
Sagehens with a score of 6-1. 

"Our guys competed as if their life 
depended on it with tremendous team spirit. 
We just have to keep our hope alive," Head 
Coach Mike Genette said. 

The Kingsmen will head to Ojai, Calif., 
to play in the Ojai Valley Invitational where 
the players will have a chance to make it 
individually to Nationals. 

"It is disappointing to know 
that we have a smaller 
possibility of going to 
Nationals." 



Junya Hasebe 
Senior 



Golf shoots lowest score of year 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The CLU golf team shot its lowest score 
this season by defeating Occidental College, 
288^139. 

Freshman Christian Colunga had the 
lowest individual score, 69, followed by soph- 
omore Peder Nyhus who finished the par-71 
course even. Junior Jason Poyser completed 
the course 2-up, freshman Nick Vemer and 
Tyler Doyle shot a 75 and a 77. respectively, 
and senior Jordan Silvertrust finished with a 
79. 

"Our guys have been playing really well 
over the last month or so," Head Coach Jeff 
Lindgren said. "Each of the guys has had their 
own rounds where they did well individually. 
In order for us to shoot a good team score, 
everyone needs to do well on the same day 



and that's what we did on Thursday." 

"Anything under 290 is awesome. Just 
the fact that we won by 51 strokes means 
that our players beat every one of their play- 
ers," Silvertrust said. "We're done with dual 
matches; the next two matches are on Monday, 
April 19. and Thursday, April 22." 

Lindgren, Vemer and Silvertrust said that 
unlike previous tournaments, the weather on 
Thursday was suitable for golf. 

"We had great weather," Lindgren said. 
"It was a litrje breezy, but it was warm, and 
overall, it was one of the better days at Sterling 
Hills." 

Over the last month, CLU has moved up 
in the NCAA Division III national rankings. 

"We're hoping if we play well over 
the next couple of weeks, we can get our- 
selves into the NCAA Division III National 
Championship," Lindgren said. 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 
to work less than 20 minutes 

from CLU! 

Spend the most rewarding 

summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn $2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamp.com 






April 21, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 11 



Leopards prey on Kingsmen 




)hs by Kyle Peterson 

Above: The Kingsmen and their coach gather around to talk strategy. Below: Junior David 
Ramirez celebrates as he rounds the bases after hitting a home run. 



Photographs by Kyle Peterson 

Junior Danny Chaparro hustles backward from the infield to catch the fly ball. 




By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University base- 
ball team had a tough week as they took on the 
La Veme Leopards. The Kingsmen came out 
ready to play the Leopards on Friday, April 16, 
but fell short losing to the Leopards, 10-4. 

The Kingsmen led with single runs in 
the second and third innings, but the Leopards 
came back and tied up the game in the fifth. 
The game took another turn as sophomore 
Christian Hariot went up to bat and hit a two- 
run home run to gain the lead back for CLU. 

The Leopards didn't give up; they had 
eight runs at the top of the ninth that led La 
Veme to their victory. 

"Basically we started off great, but we 
just couldn't hold it in the end. We had good 
defense throughout, but we just broke down in 



the end,' 1 junior Simon Lozano said. 

Hariot finished 3-for-4 with a double, 
a home run and three RBls. Freshman Nate 
Cusick took the loss for the Kingsmen as 
the relief pitcher. Starting pitcher junior Jon 
Calmes went eight innings, giving up three 
runs on nine hits and striking out five. 

The Kingsmen traveled to La Veme 
Saturday, April 17, and lost again to the 
Leopards, 12-4. 

"We didn't come out prepared to play, 
and we didn't swing the bats like we can. 
Overall, we simply just didn't play our game," 
junior Roy Riley said. 

The Kingsmen started the second game 
of the doubleheader, but it had to be postponed 
until the next day. The Leopards were lead- 
ing 3-1 at the bottom of the inning, and the 
Kingsmen had a runner on base. 



The game resumed on Sunday, April 18, 
at La Veme. The Kingsmen fought hard but 
were still unable to beat the Leopards; they fell 
short, losing 9-3. 

"We played good defense, but they just 
had a better offense than we did this week. 
They made moves that were key to help 
them win, and we didn't make those moves," 
Calmes said. "They were just a really good 
team." 

"We didn't come out pre- 
pared to pJay, and we didn't 
swing the bats like we can. 
Overall, we simply just 
didn't play our game." 

Roy Riley 
Junior 



Regals tennis takes third place in tourney 



"We needed to come out 
strong and bulldoze them 
quickly so we could get 
on to the main match of 
the day which was against 
Redlands." 

Blair Murphy 
Sophomore 

By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 

On Friday, April 16, the California 
Lutheran University women's tennis 
team hosted the SCIAC championships at 
Claremont where the Regals finished third 
place overall in the event. 



The first opponent the Regals encountered 
was the California Institute of Technology, 
which didn't have enough might to stop the 
Regals in their SCIAC championship start. 

The Regals, who beat C1T 9-0, had no 
close scores except at No. 3, when freshman 
Briana Smalling defeated Jenny Hsato 6-1,7- 
6 (3). All of the other Regals didn't drop more 
than four games in the match up. In doubles, 
the Regals won all three matches easily, giving 
them the early advantage and getting them an 
easy start for the next round when they played 
the University of Redlands Bulldogs. 

"We needed to come out strong and 
bulldoze them quickly so we could get on to 
the main match of the day which was against 
Redlands," sophomore Blair Murphy said. 

The much-anticipated match of the day 
for CLU came when the Regals faced the 



University of Redlands to make their way into 
the semifinals. 

The match started with a 2-1 deficit in 
doubles where the team of junior Jen Hansen 
and senior Rebecca Hunau were the only ones 
to score for the Regals. The Regals fired up 
to rebound off their loss of the doubles point 
and won three singles matches to give the 
Regals four points overall. These four points 
weren't enough to beat Redlands, who ended 
up defeating the Regals. 5-4. 

Singles was a good component of the 
Regals game. No. 2 Hunau, No. 3 Lisa 
Novajosky and No. 4 Murphy dominated 
their matches. Hansen at No. I was very close 
to taking the Regals to the next round, barely 
losing 6-2, 7-6. 

"All our team played a top-notch match, 
and Jen Hansen had one of the best perfor- 



mances that I have seen in her career at CLU," 
said Head Coach Nancy Garrison. 

For third place, the Regals faced the 
Pomona Pitzer Sagehens, but because of rain 
the match was canceled and therefore no play 
went on that day. 

"We were disappointed not to play against 
Pomona since we wanted to beat them again 
and make sure that they had no possibility of 
getting third place. We also wanted a more 
secure spot for Nationals," Novajosky said. 

The Regals will play individually for 
a spot in the NCAA Division 111 individual 
regional tournament in Ojai, Calif, where both 
the men's and the women's teams will battle 
to further their tennis season and try to bring 
CLU another national individual title. 



Water polo remains positive despite losing streak 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



It was a tough time for the California 
Lutheran University women's water polo 
team — it lost both of its matches this week. 

The Regals went down fighting but still 
were not able to beat Redlands on Wednesday, 
April 14. 

Freshman Danielle Rios scored three 
goals, while freshman Kenuyo Ishida had one 
along with a steal. Freshman Kayla Schrock 
had nine saves and three steals in the game. 



"They had a lot of players on their team, 
and they were good on offense. I think that 
we could have done better if we had a big- 
ger team. That way, we wouldn't be so tired 
and we could sub in and out," freshman Jen 
Danielson said. 

The Regals then had a game on Saturday, 
April 17, against the Whitrier Poets. The Poets 
crushed the Regals, who lost 15-7. 

"We did well, but we felt the course was 
set wrong. The halfway mark was off and 
closer to one goal than the other. So I believe 
that if the mark was right, we could have 



at least won more of the sprints," freshman against California Institute of Technology. 
Scarlett Williams said. 

Rios led the team with goals, finishing 
with three. Williams had two goals and two 
steals. Freshman Mackenzie Faumuina and 
Ishida had one goal apiece. Schrock had nine 
saves for the game. 

"I think that we came out strong this 
week and have improved ourselves so much 
over the season," Faumuina said. "I think that 
all of our hard work has been paying ofT." 

The Regals play their final game of the 
season on Wednesday, April 21. at home 



"I think we could have 
done better if we had a 
bigger team. That way, we 
wouldn't be so tired and we 
could sub in and out." 



Jen Danielson 
Freshman 



12 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



April 21, 2004 



Intramural Sports 



Standings as of 4-19-04 

Basketball 




League 1 


League 2 


(5-0) 


League 3 


(5-0) 


Green Grass Blades (5-0) 


Bumblebees 


CalmB4TheStorm 


NotU (4-1) 


Uptown 


(4-1) 


Bad Boys 


(3-2) 


Darkness (3-2) 


Free Saddam 


(3-2) 


The Dynasty 


(3-2) 


Bomberman Don't Practice (2-3) 


Power Flex 


(2-3) 


111 Tempered 1 1 


(3-2) 


California Blazers (1-4) 


Slow Motion 


(1-4) 


Steel Reserve 


(1-4) 


LaBron's Squad (0-5) 


Chunks Revenge 


(0-5) 


Braddas 


(0-5) 


.---"" 










/ 











m 



X 



Softball 



Legends and the Fall (6-1) 

Fox Hunters (6-1) 

LAChiefers (6-1) 

The Dynasty (5-0) 

The Hitters Club (4-1) 

The Eugoogalizers (4-3 

Logans Hero's (3-2) 

The Short Bus Crew (3-4) 



Juice Train 

Team Yahtzee 

Team Ramrod 

Green Death 

Bucketheads 

Underrated 

Riff Raff 

The Opposing Team 



12^1 
(2-4) 
(2-4) 
(2-4) 
(2-5) 
(1-5) 
(0-2) 
(0-6) 



This week on Fox Sports: 

CLU Baseball Player 

Mike Kaczowka! 

Wednesday, 10:30 p.m. on CLU-TV Ch. 16 



California Lutheran University 



Volume 44 No. 23 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Softball defeats Occidental to 
finish season. 



See story page 8 



April 28, 2004 



Features 

Award-winning photojournalist Val Mazzenga visits CLU. 

See story page 4 



Opinion 

Letters to the Editor. 



See story page 6 



CLU hosts Scandinavian Festival 



By Ashley George 
Staff Writer 



The 31st annual Scandinavian Festival 
hosted by California Lutheran University 
attracted hundreds of visitors over the week- 
end of April 24-25. 

The festival, which took place from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. in Kingsmen Park, featured 
live music, authentic Scandinavian food, a 
petting zoo and Scandinavian art. 

The cost was $10 for adults and S6 for 
teens and senior citizens. CLU students were 
admitted free of charge. 

"Educating ... students about other 
cultures is the first step to diversifying the 
campus," freshman Brian Coltin said. 

Visitors arrived dressed in traditional 
Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish apparel. 
Flags from various Scandinavian countries 
were planted around campus. 

Children were invited to play games. 



and visitors were encouraged to walk 
through a model of a Viking camp. 

Dog breeders set up a booth where 
visitors could pet and play with Norwegian 
Elkhounds. Owners shared information 
about the breed and answered visitors' ques- 
tions. 

A children's choir sang "The Star- 
Spangled Banner" while family, friends and 
visitors watched 

A number of other recitals took place, 
including a performance by Dr. Dorothy 
Schechter of CLU, who played the piano. 

A petting zoo, which featured several 
goats, baby chickens, several rabbits, a pig 
and a chicken, was open to visitors for a $3 
fee. In addition to the petting zoo, pony rides 
were available for children. 

A quartet played traditional 
Scandinavian music while artists sold their 
pottery, paintings and other artwork. 

Some vendors sold woodwork, 




A dance floor allowed for performers to participate in traditional 
Scandinavian dances.- 

Spring Formal 
takes to the seas 



By Jen Ledesma 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University held its 
annual Spnng Formal Saturday, April 24. The 
event was held on a yacht in Newport Beach 
Calif. 

The dance, held on "The Entertainer," a 
three-story yacht, was themed "Come away 
with me." 

Students were allowed to start boarding 
the boat at 7:30 p.m. The evening began with 
a formal dinner. Decorated tables took up both 
the first and second floors for dinner seating. 

"I thought it was lovely. The food was a 
little slow-serviced, but it was excellent. They 
played good music, too," sophomore Grace 
May said 

After dinner was over, tables on the sec- 
ond floor of the yacht were cleared away to 
make room for dancing. 



Music played for a little over two hours 
while the yacht sailed around the Newport 
Beach Harbor. To cool off, students went out 
onto the third deck for some stargazing. 

"It was good, but I wished they played 
more music. Dinner took forever, but it was 
super fun anyway," junior Carly Sandell said. 

Tickets to the formal sold out early, with 
over 350 students attending the event Dancing 
ended just before midnight as the ship pulled 
back into the dock. 

"I couldn't be happier with the way that 
the night turned out. When it finally set in that 
we were all floating on a yacht under the stars 
and getting to dance the night away, I thought 
it was great!," said Katy Wilson, the CLU 
dance and social activities coordinator. 

Students closed out the evening with 
a slow dance to the Norah Jones song that 
provided the evening's name, "Come Away 
With Me." 




Scandinavian royals partake of a feast that included many authentic 
foods. 



while others sold purses, wool socks and 
Scandinavian jewelry. 

A stage featured a number of live 
musical acts, including a group of men and 
women singing traditional Finnish songs. A 
large dance floor provided people with a 
place to perform folk dances. 



A rock climbing wall and several 
"Moon Bounces" also provided entertain- 
ment for people of all ages. 

"I really enjoyed the Scandinavian 
Festival. It ... made me feel in touch with 
my Nordic heritage," freshman Dave Dom 
said. 




A young girl visits the festival in 
her first traditional dress. 



The festival "king" and his queen 
dine in eloquent fashion. 

AH photographs by Kyle Peterson 



CLU alum to be featured on TV 



By Devon Bostock 
Press Release 



California Lutheran University alumna 
Kelly Culwell (class of 1995) will be appear- 
ing on the Discovery Health Channel. The 
special is titled 'Unexpected Joy." It is part of 
the **Babies: Special Delivery" series. It will 



run April 27 at 9 p.m., April 28 at 12 a.m. and 
May at 12 pjn. The episode features Culwell 
delivering a baby via Caesarian section. 

Culwell is currently in her last 10 weeks 
as the chief resident at the University of 
California at San Diego Medical Center. 
When she graduates, she plans on work- 
ing for an obstetncs/gynecology practice in 
Vista, Calif. 



®395 Jimmm 



The Echo 



Calendar 




APRIL 28, 2004 



a sneak peek of this week at the lu 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:I0a.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel Narthex 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday 

april 29 



Mains/age 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

8 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball Championship 

Gym 

9 p.m. 



The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

april 30 

Friday Eucharist 

Meditation Chapel 
12 p.m. 

Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
8 p.m. 

Honors Day Convocation 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Club Lu: Lu 'au 

Gym 
8:30 p.m. 



Saturday 

may 1 

Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 

"■-■ ^r° 

Sunday ($3 

may 2 

Mainstage 3 - "Don Juan in Hell" 

Preus-Brandt Forum 
2 p.m. 

Intramural Softball 

Gibello Field 
10 a.m. 

Lord of Life Worship Service 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 





monday 

may 3 

ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 1 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen I 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCL V-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen I ^^ 

8:30 p.m. 



tuesday 

may 4 



* 



Psychology Club Meeting 

Mogen Hall Lounge 
8 p.m. 



DAY CAMP OPPORTUNITIES! 



Summer Day Camps seek General 
Counselors & Specialist Instructors. 
Located just 10 min. from CLU, staff 
can earn ?2800-$3S00+ forthesum 
mer working with children outdoors! 
Call (888) 784-CAMP or visit 
www.workatcamp.com 



SUMMER JOBS... 
GET PAID EXPERIENCE 

San Fernando Valley. Santa Clarita 
Valley, Simi & Conejo Valley areas. 
Receptionist. File Clerk, Admin. 
Assistant, Customer Service and 

MANY OTHERS needed. 
Work as much or as seldom as you 

like — you decide! 

Come to the office closest to you: 

SAR-RINGTON STAFFING 

SERVICES 

Thousand Oaks (805) 494-8695 

Woodland Hills (818) 703-8658 

Burbank(818) 954-0054 

Valencia (661)294-9046 

Our services are FREE to applicants 



DISTRIBUTE BROCHURES 

Earn $375 to $560 a month work- 
ing only 22 hours a month! Pref- 
erably Monday through Friday. 
Must be available after 2 p.m. 

For more information, call: 
(866) 7-TUTORS 



classifieds 

Tutors Needed: $15-$18/hr. to start Teach 
one-on-one, in-home SAT I Math and/or Verbal 
& Academic subjects in your area of expertise. 
Paid training. Flexible hours. Reliable transpor- 
tation required. Mail, fax, or email cover letter 
and resume. Include standardized test scores 
(SATI/II.GRE. etc.) 

If interested, mail information to: 

ACE Educational Services; ATTN: Luke 

9911 W. Pico Blvd., Suite PH-K; 

Los Angeles, CA 90035 

or fax resume to: (310)282-6424 

or email resume* to: 

tnstructorhiriDg6@aceeducation.com 



r Pr a & 



>e placed 
for a flat 



Classified ads 
on the Calendc 

rate regardless of word count. 
Discount available for multiple- 
issue orders. Ads are subject to 
editing for content and cfantu. 

Call: 
C3Q5) +?5->3^5 



International Peer Mentors 1 



Become a mentor to new international 
students 

Share your college experience and 
knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 12- 30 tn 
@ front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to May 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 

For information, call: 
luanita Pryor Hall @ (805) 493-395 1 



MULTICULTURAL 



STEERING COMMITTEE 

Leadership Positions For Students 
Who Want To Have A Sav 



Take Back the Night 

Wednesday, April 28th 
Schedule of Events: 

6:30 p.m. - Community resource information tables 

7:30 p.m. - Rally 

8 p.m. - Candlelight march on CLU campus 

The first take back the night rally in the United States was 
held in San Francisco in 1978 to protest violence against 
women, particularly sexual assault. Since then, take back 
the night events have spread across the nation broaden- 
ing in perspective and taking on many forms. Sexual assault 
is everyone's problem. Therefore, men, women and chil- 
dren are welcome and encouraged to join us on our march. 
If you have questions please call Michelle Taylor at (805) 8070793 



RESPONSIRIIITIFS 

Give insight into Multicultural 

programming 

Decide which books & videos to add 

to the Multicultural library 
Put on campus diversity campaigns 
Participate & organize Martin Luther 

King, Jr. Chapel Service 
Evaluate Multicultural Programs Office 

Attend Multicultural events 

Generate conversations about issues 

of diversity on campus 



Re gistration Dates & Times 



Web begins at 5 p.m. & 8:30 a.m. for walk-in 
100-110+ Credits: 

Web: Tue., April 27 

Walk-in: Wed., April 28 
78-99 Credits: 

Web: Vied., April 28 

Walk-in: Thur, April 29 
58-78 Credits: 

Web: Thur., April 29 

Walk-in: Ftl, April 30 
' 35-57 Credits: • 

Weo.'Fri., April 30 

Walk-in: Mon., May 3 
15-34 Credits: 

Weft: Mon, May 3 

Walk-in: Tues., May 4 
0-15 Credits: 

Weft. Tues., May 4 

Walk-in: Wed., May 5 
Total credits do NOT include Spring 2004. 



INVITATION 



The Morning Glory Staff 
invites you to the presenting of the 

2004 Morning Glory. 

Join us in celebrating the Morning 

Glory artists and their literary visual 

& audio ails, at a poetry reading & 

distribution of the magazine. 

April 29th at 7 p.m. 

in the Kwan Fong Gallery 

For more information, call: 

Nicole or Jody @ x2380 or David @ 

x230lorDr. Wines® x3277. 



/ 
\ 

1 



^ 



" 5E THE DIFFERENCE " 

(A Mentoring Program) 

Become a mentor to an Upward Bound* 

high school student 

Share your college experience and knowledge 

Build your resume 

Apply between April 12 - 30 tn 

e front desk in SUB 

Commitment from September to Mau 

Sponsored by Multicultural Programs 
For information, call luanita Pryor Hall® (6051 493-3951 





Mini-Grant 
Opportunities 
for Fall 2004 

(Funded by the Irvine Campus Diversity Initiative) 

Do you have a great idea to help improve 
our campus climate for diversity' 

77ie President 's Diversify Council 
& the Diversity Task Force #3 
(GLOBE) invites members of the 
CLU campus community to apply 
for one of the $500 Campus Cli- 
mate Diversity Mini-grants. 

Mini-grant applications guide 

lines are now available in the 

Multicultural Programs Office 

(located in the SUB). 

Need more information ? 

An informational meeting will be held on 

April 30th @ 10 a.m. 

in the Pavilion or in the SUB if it rains 

Or. call: Juanita Pryor Hall @ x395 1 . 



April 28, 2004 



FEATURES 



The Echo 3 



What are you looking Car of the Week 

forward to this summer? r~ ~- 







Becky Badertscher. music. 2004 



Victoria Reinhardt history, 2004 



"Having no homework and getting tan." "Time off with no professors breathing 

down my neck." 








Ryan Tukua. exercise science, 2004 



Beau Kimbrel, multimedia, 2004 



Car of the Week is compiled by Kyle Peterson 

Freshman Chris Ryan shreds the tires in his 1999 Pontiac Trans Am. 
Putting power to his NITTO 555R drag radials on 17 x 9.5 American 
Racing wheels is a 5.7 LSi V8. The engine breathes through MIT power 
induction and custom Sebring Bullets with 3" pipes. 



Think your car could 

be named 
"Car of the Week"? 

Call Kyle at X2791. 



"Going on a cruise to Mexico with seven "Starting work and getting 

of my friends." money for it" 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jimmy Fox. Photography is by Claire 

Hillard. 



HOW CAN DRAMA PROMOTE SOCIAL JUSTICE? 

CLU alumnus Roberto Gutierrez Varea 

talks about combining theater arts and social work 

during the Honors Day Convocation 

Samuelson Chapel — Friday, April 30, 10 a.m. 



Movie Review 



More story, less action in "Kill Bill: V. 2" 



Have you ever dreamt of being a firefighter*; 

Then come out this 

Thursday, April 29, from 6-9 p.m. 

on the corner of Chapel Lane and Campus Drive 

for your chance to chat with current firefighters. 

Questions? 
Call Chris Paul at x3546. 



By Ryan Leach 
Staff writer 



Awesome. This movie is ridic- 
ulously good. If you have seen the 
first "Kill Bill," you've undoubt- 
edly already checked out the sequel. 
However, for all of you who missed 
the first one or somehow let the 
sequel slip your grasp, know this: 
"Kill Bill: Vol. 2" is the best flick 
I've seen since either "The Dawn 
of the Dead" remake or "Bubba 
Ho-tep." 

If you haven't seen the first 
one, do. I wholeheartedly recom- 
mend seeing it prior to the sequel. 
The sequel does a brief recap of the 
plight of Beatrix Kiddo (played by 
Uma Thurman), but the first film is 
such an awesome movie in and of 
itself, a five-minute review falls ter- 
ribly short of capturing the essence 
of the precursor (would you feel 
fulfilled with a best of "The Who" 
album? Answer: No. Just get their 
first record). 



"Kill Bill: Vol. 2" relies a 

little more on its storyline than 

it does in its action sequences (at 

least compared to the first). There 
are no real bloodbaths in this flick, 
but there is still tons of action. The 
movie follows Quentin Tarantino's 
typical style of jumping back and 
forth through different time peri- 
ods. We learn where Beatrix Kiddo 
received some of her training, and 
why it is important to be able to 
punch through wood blocks at close 
range. There are some curveballs 
thrown in that I don't want to give 
away. The sequel certainly focuses 
more on Bill (played by David 
Carradine) and his past relationship 
with Kiddo. 

My only qualm with this flick 
is, why couldn't Tarantino have 
brought back the "5.6.7.8's" for this 
film? That band is so ridiculously 
good I am tempted to turn in all my 
Trashwomen records for their back 
catalogue. That aside, the ruling: 
check this one out. 




iV«nmT.< m MaMmi fry lb HfcWMtawtafai >4 SrtwJi mi Ch8qb 

Call hr .i I'm- information packttl 
Toll-free: I -888-CLU-GRAD or 805-493-3 1 27 

clugrad@clunet.edu • www.clunet.edu/graduate 



California Lutheran University 



4 The Echo 



FEATURES 



April 28, 2004 



Famed photo journalist speaks in chapel 



By Sierra McGuire 
Staff Writer 



Who knew that a high school drop 
out would one day become one of the 
most storied American photojoumalists? 
Val Mazzenga, shares his amazing experi- 
ences through a multimedia presentation 
across college campuses. His presenta- 
tion at California Lutheran University on 
Friday, April 23, in the Samuelson Chapel, 
shared "The Untold Story" of his travels 
and experiences world wide. 

He told stories illustrated by his 
photos of villains and heroes, like Jim 
Jones, leader of the 1 978 mass suicide in 
Jonestown, Guyana, and homerun record 
holder Mark McGwire. Mazzenga also 
shared his experiences in places around 
the world including Brazil, Chile, Rio De 
Janeiro, Mexico City. Peru, Cambodia, 
Thailand, India, Hong Kong, Vietnam and 
China. 

He never finished high school, never 



"Artists and 
photographers never 
retire, they just take 
different avenues." 

Val Mazzenga 
Speaker 

attended college and never took a single 
photography class. 

"For never taking classes, his compo- 
sition is amazing," said senior Tori Alcox. 

At 15, he worked as a copy boy 
for the "Chicago Tribune." Working as 
an assistant to eight photographers, he 
learned the tricks of the trade and soon 
was on staff as a photographer. 

"I wanted to be a baseball player. I 
wanted to be a pilot. But when I became 
a photographer, that was it," Mazzenga 
said. 

Mazzenga is the most honored pho- 



Senior art exhibit opens 
in Kwan Fong Gallery 



By Jihan Gray 
Staff writer 



Once a year, graduating California 
Lutheran University seniors have the 
opportunity to put their art on display. The 
Kwan Fong Gallery hosted the opening of 
graduating art major's final projects for the 
year. 

Although the exhibit will be up until 
May 15. the opening provided a chance 
for those interested to meet the artists and 
discuss the pieces of art. 

"1 want people to know the experience 
of the art, understand the time that went 
into creating it," said senior Chris Hughes. 

A lot of the art pieces are done in 
acrylic. The majority of artists chose deep 
rich colors that seem to convey the mood 
of the art. 

Some of the themes included diversity 



in life, love, personal view, and various 
other topics. 

"The exhibit is really great because art 
is really done by yourself unless you're in 
a class. Seeing everyone else's art is inspir- 
ing," said senior Renee Papegay. 

Some of the art works includes 
Elizabeth Hergert's series entitled "Children 
of Dust" (the series of three works include 
acrylic and water color), Amie Haltman's 
"Man and Woman" (an acrylic piece on 
plywood) and Bryan Zumo's "Portrait of 
Sunny Garcia." 

The art exhibit shows how individuals 
on the CLU campus chose to express them- 
selves through art. 

One should take the time to see the 
art before it is removed on May 15, but 
beware, the art may inspire some viewers 
to create their own art. 



tographer in "Tribune" history, earning 
over 200 awards, including five Beck 
Awards and six Pulitzer Prize nomina- 
tions. Through his presentation, he includ- 
ed photos of deaths in Jonestown, Guyana, 
starvation in Africa and Camivale in Rio. 
He also showed a photo essay of Mother 
Teresa, President Nixon, and sports heroes 
Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Sammy 
Sosa and Barry Bonds. 

Although today the photo world 
seems to be going digital, Mazzenga con- 
tinues to do photo shoots with film. 

"I like that he stays true to his craft 
by using film, " said sophomore Kevin 
Cortez. 

Currently, Mazzenga is compiling a 
book of his work, and enjoying the free- 
dom of being freelance. 

"Artists and photographers never 
retire, they just take different avenues," 
Mazzenga said. 

When asked about his best photo, 
Mazzenga said, "I've yet to make it." 




Photography by Kyle Peterson 
Speaker Val Mazzenga discusses his pho- 
tojournalism career on Friday. April 23 




Photography by Todd Kugler 



Senior Elizabeth Hergert prepares her art work to be displayed in the Kwan Fong Gal- 
lery of Art and Culture. The art work will be displayed through May 15. 



Hod Nighfcs, Cool Trips, 
Advisors wifch Piercings, 



Why Grandpa doesn't book his 



Summer TripJ 




Paris $467 Madrid. ..$602 

London. ...$426 Fiji $765 

HBESEMm 
HQUUnil 

5 night accomm. 



From: 

$454 



LP/ CO BO/ 

4 night accomm. 

dpriEoanjMi From: 

S=S $464 




7280 Melrose Ave 18111 NordhopP Sc, Mocodor Book Complei 

(323) 934.8722 (818) 882.4692 



lwww.statravel.com. | 



STUDENT TRAVEL & BEYOND 



*A 'Beautiful Look 

Pull-Service Hair Salon for Men & Women 

(805) 492-4818 

New customers: Mention this ad and bring a friend for 

FREE. He or she will receive treatment at equal or 

less value for FREE! 

You must call ahead to schedule an appointment and mention this ad at the time of the 



May not be combined with any other offer. 



41 1 E. Avenue de Lus Arnole* in Thousand o.iks 
Near Rile Aid .in.l Whole F.iodv 



Visit the Echo online at 
www. clunet . edu/echo 



April 28, 2004 



OPINION 



The Rpho 5 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran Univ. 

60 W. Olsen Rd. #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor are 

welcome on any topic related to 

CLU or to The Echo. 

Letters must include the writer's 

name, year/position and major/ 

department. 

Letters are subject to editing for 
space and clarity. 



The Echo 
Schedule 



The final issue of the Echo 
will be published on: 

May 5 



ASCLU senate should not censor 




By Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 



The ASCLU Senate narrowly (6-7 to 
overturn) approved a student lead initiative 
to establish a chapter of NORML as a student 
club here at CLU last week. The initiative, 
sponsored by Etienne Emanuel and Quinn 
Longhurst in conjunction with philosophy 
professor William Bersley, creates a school- 
sponsored club dedicated to the promotion of 
the political agenda of the nationwide National 
Organization for the Reform of Marijuana 
Laws. 

The organization's mission statement 
reads: "NORML's mission is to move public 
opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of 
marijuana prohibition so that the responsible 
use of cannabis by adults is no longer subject 
to penalty." 

Debate was sparked by a number of 
ASCLU members who were concerned that 
die club would promote drug use or other 



equally unhealthy habits. After the initiative 
was originally passed, a group of six ASCLU 
members, headed by Valerie Vallejos, tried 
to overturn the bill, but failed. And at such a 
failure, I laugh. 

Why would members of the Senate want 
to prevent students from establishing a chapter 
of a well-known political organization? Surely, 
their reasons must be content-based. I'm cer- 
tain that this same group of senators, opposed 
to establishing a NORML chapter, would have 
no reservations about passing a bill to establish 
a chapter of the National Rifle Association. In 
fact, I wouldn't be surprised if they openly 
wept tears of joy after establishing a chapter 
of the NRA. My delusion(s) aside, this blatant 
attempt at censorship is appalling. 

The Supreme Court of the United States 
has consistently rejected content-based censor- 
ship. In most cases, the Court has rejected all 
forms prior-restraint. However, some members 
of the ASCLU senate attempted to enforce 
prior-restraint upon a political organization. 
Although the senate is not bound by Supreme 
Court precedent, I would think that any entity 
charged with voicing the opinions of the CLU 
student body would take such precedents into 
consideration. 

Had the Vallejos commission succeeded, 
all political organizations here at CLU would 
be subject to the whim of the senate. Perhaps 
next year, Vallejos and her cronies would 



"The Supreme Court has 
consistently rejected 
content-based censor- 
ship." 



Brett Rowland 
Editor in Chief 

have attempted to revoke the charter of the 
Democratic Club. 

The Supreme Court has afforded politi- 
cal speech the highest protection under the 
First Amendment. To wit: "This court has 
characterized the freedom of speech and that 
of the press as fundamental personal rights 
and liberties. The phrase is not an empty 
one and was not lightly used. It reflects the 
belief of the framers of the Constitution that 
exercise of the rights lies at the foundation of 
free government by free men. It stresses, as do 
many opinions of this court, the importance 
of preventing the restriction of enjoyment of 
these liberties." (Schneider v. New Jersey, 308 
U.S. 147(1939). 

The Vallejos commission would have bet- 
ter served the CLU community by promoting 
diversity and public discourse instead of trying 
to impose some backwater Nazi pnor-restraint 
crap on a university campus. 



A call for sporting equality 



By Emily Gjellstad 
Special to the Echo 



I am writing to all the women out there 
who love to play golf. There is no women's 
golf team here at CLU, and that is something 
that needs to be changed. Though the efforts 
of establishing a team are growing, there needs 
to be more action. 

"Women's golf has been on the near hori- 
zon in the last few years," said Bruce Bryde, 
Director of Athletics. He also said he believes 
there is sufficient interest among women on 
campus to sustain a program. There are, how- 
ever, several issues that need to be discussed 
before a team can be formed. 

It is important to understand that the 
implementation of a new sport on campus 
takes time. It could possibly take up to two 
years before the program is operating in full. 
However, turning women's golf into a club 



sport could be the first step. With a club sport, 
though, there is no ftinding from the athletic 
department There may be some funding from 
ASCLU, but club sports are generally self- 
funded programs, according to Bryde. Men's 
rugby and lacrosse, are currenUy the two club 
sports here on campus. Forming a club sport 
takes a lot of dedication, and a lot of work from 
those involved, but it could grow in to a fully 
sponsored Southern California Intercollegiate 
Athletics Conference (SCIAC) sport. 

Golf has grown tremendously in the past 
few years for women, and it would be a great 
addition to CLU athletics. The first thing nec- 
essary for the implementation of a golf team is 
to see what kind of interest the women at CLU 
have. Once there is an expressed interest, 
we can team up with the Claremont-Mudd- 
Scripps team, which is the only conference 
school to support a women's golf team, to 
encourage the rest of the SCIAC to support 
women's golf. The SCIAC currently sponsors 



rune women's teams, and 10 men's teams. 
CLU has teams for each of the sponsored 
sports. Because there are more teams offered 
for men, it makes sense that another sport 
should be offered for women. Right now, 
however, CLU doesn't have a team because 
there isn't enough competition according to 
Bryde. Once the conference gets involved, 
we will be a huge step ahead. Let's make 
CLU a leader in persuading other conference 
schools to support a women's golf team. A lot 
of work is involved in forming a team, but it is 
worth it. It is important to enhance women's 
athletics, and by adding a women's golf team 
here at CLU, that can be done. In a few years, 
women golfers at CLU may be competing at 
the collegiate level. 

The only way this can happen is for 
women golfers to express some interest. If 
you are interested in a women's golf team at 
CLU, give me a call at ext. 265 1 . At the very 
least, maybe we could hit the driving range. 




WE i 




Brett Rowland 
EDITOR rN CHIEF/OPrNION 

Devon Bostock 
NEWS EDITOR 

Yvette Ortiz 

CIRCULATION/ MANAGING/ 

CALENDAR 

Karly Wilhelm 
FEATURES EDITOR 

Tawny Ingwaldson 
SPORTS EDITOR 

Kyle Peterson 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Nicholas Andersen 
ONLINE EDITOR 

Brittney Carter-Rowland 
COPY EDITOR 

Moriah Harris-Rodger 

Rachel Pensack-Rinehart 

PROOFREADERS 

Amanda Hom 
BUSINESS MANAGER 



Roy Ehrlich 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Dr Druann Pagliassotti 
ADVISER 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
comments on its articles as well as on the newspaper 
itself. However, the staff acknowledges that opinions 
presented do not necessarily represent the views of 
the ASCLU or of California Lutheran University. The 
Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, editorials, 
letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions 
become property of The Echo. 

Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the 
advertising party or otherwise specifically stated, 
advertisements in The Echo are inserted by com- 
mercial activities or ventures identified in the adver- 
tisements themselves and not by California Lutheran 
University. Advertising material printed herein is sole- 
ly for informational purposes. Such printing is not to 
be construed as a written and implied sponsorship, 
endorsement or investigation of such commercial 
enterprises or ventures. Complaints concerning 
advertisements in The Echo should be directed to 
the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 

Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be 
addressed to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California 
Lutheran University, 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand 
Oaks, CA 91360-2787. Telephone (805) 493-3465: 
Fax (805) 493-3327; E-mail echo@clunet.edu. 



®3flE ^OIJC® 



The Echo 



OPINION 



April 28, 2004 



The rise and fall of Martha Stewart 




By Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 



Whether you love her or despise her, 
Martha Stewart has once again captured the 
media's spotlight, only this time, it isn't for 
the latest fondue recipe. 

The once-glorified domestic goddess 
and multi-million dollar homemaker was 
convicted recently on all charges, including 
"obstruction of justice, charges of conspiracy 
and two counts of making false statements 
to federal investigators." With each charge 
carrying a maximum prison sentence of five 
years, Stewart could spend a maximum of 
20 years behind bars. 

Although legal experts believe she will 
not have to endure a prison term longer than 
10 to 16 months, Stewart must also pay a 
fine of S250.000 for perjury and obstruction 
of justice "in connection with a well-timed 
stock sale" that saved die domestic guru a 
meager $5 1 ,000. Her sentencing is set for 
June 17. 

Convicted along with Stewart was her 
personal stockbroker, Pete^Bacanovic, who 
was found guilty on all the same counts, but 
was cleared of a separate charge of making 



false documents. 

Prosecutors said Stewart received "an 
improper tip that federal regulators would 
not approve ImClone's anti-cancer drug, 
Erbitux." However, her defense claims 
Stewart already had a prior arrangement to 
sell her stock if the price ever fell below a 
certain point. 

Both Stewart and Bacanovic have said 
that they will appeal to have their convic- 
tions overturned. 

On her official website, Stewart writes, 
"I am obviously distressed by the jury's 
verdict, but I continue to take comfort in 
knowing that I have done nothing wrong. I 

"I doubt locking up 
Martha Stewart would 
do much good other 
than give us a few more 
laughs." 

Brandee J. Tecson 
Columnist 

will appeal the verdict and continue to fight 
to clear my name. I remain confident that I 
will ultimately prevail." 

Stewart, who gained a reputation of 
being a shrewd and cold businesswoman, 
became a target for suspicion when she 
dumped nearly 4,000 shares of ImClone on 
Dec. 27, 2001, reportedly after learning that 
her close friend Sam Waksal, the biotech 
company's founder, was frantically frying to 
sell his stock before share prices plummeted 
following the bad news. 

Stewart stepped down from her role as 
chairman and CEO of her company, Martha 



Stewart Living Omnimedia, after being 
indicted in June, but remains an active board 
member and still resides as chief creative 
officer. Now with her conviction, Stewart is 
likely to be removed from the board. 

Since the verdict was announced, 
shares of her stock fell nearly 23 percent. 
Also, Stewart's syndicated television show 
"Martha Stewart Living" was yanked from 
CBS and UPN stations almost immediately 
following the hearing. 

If Stewart does end up doing time, the 
domestic diva could find herself donning an 
attractive khaki jumpsuit, working for about 
1 2 cents an hour, most likely cooking in the 
kitchen, at a minimum security women's 
prison. 

On Monday, March 8, Stewart made 
her first public remarks since the ruling. 

"I want to thank my readers, my view- 
ers and the Internet users," Stewart said, 
following a meeting with her probation 
officer. "I just want to thank everyone for 
their support." 

Her head lawyer, Robert Morvillo, and 
Rebecca Monck, another member of her 
defense team, accompanied her. 

Stewart has said she will appeal the 
conviction, stating that she has done noth- 
ing wrong. However, U.S. Attorney David 
Kelley wanted to make clear that if you 
break the law, "we are going to go after you" 
... even if you're Martha Stewart. 

It appears as though Stewart's celebrity 
has, in fact, worked against her in this scan- 
dal and has possibly made her a scapegoat 
for American justice. 

Jurors in the Martha Stewart trial said 
that they felt "pity" for the homemaker as 
the verdict was read, but that they were 



ultimately sure they had made the right 
decision. 

The jury took a total of 12 hours 
over a three-day span to find Stewart and 
Bocanovoic guilty on all four counts. 

"She. made a silly mistake, and then 
they lied, and the lies just got worse," said 
Meg Crane, a juror for the case. 

But is lying enough of a faux pas that 
could put Stewart in a criminal institution 
and end the massive empire she had worked 
her entire life to build up, only to see it 
crumble in the middle of a spider web of 
ties and deceit? 

With more radical offenders running 
loose on the streets, I doubt locking up 
Martha Stewart would do much good other 
than give us a few more laughs. And at this 
point, it's no longer a laughing matter. 

As a public, we can joke all we want 
about Martha Stewart holed up in a cell- 
block sharing a toilet with another inmate. 
We've all heard the jokes on Leno and 
Letterman, and we've seen the parodies on 
Saturday Night Live. It is apparent that the 
media has been less than sympathetic to this 
woman. However, there comes a point when 
the jokes cross the line. 

Laughter is meant to entertain and 
amuse, not to be malicious or cruel. Take 
away the apron and the linens and you have 
a woman who made a mistake. Take away 
her business. Take away her television show. 
But this woman should not be locked up 
behind bars for several years of her life. 

Punish her if you will, but at least let the 
punishment fit the crime. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo: 



Dear Echo, 



Since Harmony Week, the campus has been involved in conversation about our identity as a University of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and how that influences CLU as a community of learn- 
ing. Some have argued that the activities of Harmony Week contradict our Christian roots. Others believe just 
the opposite. The Office of University Ministries welcomes this conversation as a healthy deliberation about 
our identity, mission, and values. We further believe CLU's roots "in the Lutheran tradition of the Christian 
faith" inform our campus conversation on the topic of homosexuality in two distinct ways. 

The first is in respect to how we have this conversation with one another. In "An Open Letter from the 
Bishops of the ELCA" they write: "The way we face our differences on the issues surrounding homosexuality 
can be an important expression of grace for our particular church body and for the communities in which we 
live. If we, by God's power and mercy, can model new ways to speak and to hear one another, we will have 
done a service to this church, and will have witnessed to our society. We invite gay and lesbian persons to join 
with other members of this church in mutual prayer and study of the issues that still divide us so that we may 
seek the truth together. We are determined, despite our differences, to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the 
bond of peace (Ephesians 4:3)." The tradition in which CLU is rooted calls us to actively create a climate on 
campus where various points of view on this topic are encouraged, welcomed, heard, and respectfully debated. 
How we go about this conversation on campus is as much a reflection of our Lutheran identity, as is finally 
where we individually decide to stand 

The second way in which University's Lutheran heritage shapes our approach to our conversation on 
homosexuality relates to how we regard the gay and lesbian people in the CLU community. We call attention 
to the action of the ELCA's 1991 Churchwide Assembly that declared "gay and lesbian people, as individuals 
created by God are welcome to participate fully in the life of the congregations of the ELCA." At the 1 993 
Churchwide Assembly, that declaration was extended to express "strong opposition to all forms of verbal or 
physical harassment or assault of persons because of their sexual orientation" and support for the civil rights of 
all persons, regardless of their sexual orientation. Recognizing that individual church members hold a vanety 
of opinions regarding homosexuality and on the interpretation of the scriptural texts sometimes used to con- 
demn it, the ELCA's statement makes clear that it believes the appropnate Christian response of its congrega- 
tions and institutions is diligentiy to safeguard the participation and presence of the gay and lesbian persons 
who are among their members. Furthermore, in our opinion, these statements urge us to welcome and value the 
distinct insights and perspectives that the gay and lesbian people in our CLU community bring to our campus 
discussion about homosexuality and a host of other topics. 

Each member of the Office of University Ministries welcomes the opportunity to talk further with stu- 
dents, faculty and staff about CLU's Lutheran identity and the perspective we share in this letter to the editor. 



Pr. Melissa Maxwell-Doherty 
University Pastor 

Pr. Scott Maxwell-Doherty 
University Pastor 



Pr. Reg Schultz-Akerson 
Assistant to the President for Church Relations 

Dr. R. Guy Erwin 

Director, Segerhammar Center for Faith & Culture 



So, the Bible says homosexuality is wrong, huh? Given this, I'm wondering if 
you could clear some other things up ... let's talk Leviticus. 

I have a neighbor who insists on working on the Sabbath. Exodus 35:2 clearly 
states he should be put to death. Am I morally obligated to kill him myself? *Most 
of my male friends get their hair trimmed, including the hair around their temples, 
even though this is expressly forbidden by Lev. 19:27. How should they die? 

I know from Lev. 1 1 :6-8 that touching the skin of a dead pig makes me 
unclean, but may I still play football if I wear gloves? 

Lev. 21:20 states that I may not approach the altar of God if I have a defect in 
my sight. I have to admit that I wear reading glasses. Does my vision have to be 
20/20, or is there some wiggle room here? 

I would like to sell my daughter into slavery, as sanctioned in Exodus 2 1 :7. In 
this day and age, what do you think would be a fair price for her? 



J.M. Healy 
Alumni, Christian 



Dear Echo, 



A big hello to last week's writers! A quick question for them from one 
Christian to another, since we're talking about the Bible now: 

My uncle has a farm. He violates Lev. 1 9: 1 9 by planting two different crops m 
the same field, as does his wife by wearing garments made of two different kinds 
of thread (cotton/polyester blend). He also tends to curse and blaspheme a lot Is it 
really necessary that we go to all the trouble of getting the whole town together to 
stone them? (Lev.24: 10-16). Couldn't wejust bum them to death at a private family 
affair like we do with people who sleep with their in-laws? (Lev. 20: 14) 

I know you have studied these things extensively, so I am confident you can 
help. Thank you again for reminding us that God's word is eternal and unchang- 
ing. 

Your devoted disciple and adoring fan, 
Jess 



April 28, 2004 



SPORTS 



The Echo 7 



IM goes to Grand Canyon 




Broussard, Doug Scheidt, Becky Toll, Emily Information Center. 



h courtesy of Intramural Sports 
The group poses for a picture with a breathtaking view of the Grand Canyon behind them. 



By Matt Broussard 
Special to the Echo 



The Intramurals Department recently 
decided to explore the interests of the student 
body with an outdoor adventure. A camping 
trip sparked the interest of the students, and 
Intramural Director Chris Paul decided to pur- 



sue this extension of the Intramural program. 
The Grand Canyon was on the top of the list 
of most desired places to go. 

The trip was held from April 2-5. The 
response from Grand Canyon publicity was 
enormous, and the quota was filled within the 
first two weeks. 

The 1 5 campers included Matt 



Moore, Mary Schwichtenberg, Eva Biro, John 
Hamersma, Ryan Petitfils, Elizabeth Tanis, 
Kjm Wyer, Katie Roever, Jaymie Nagasawa, 
Patrick Ellingsworth and administrators Paul 
and Lindsay Miller. 

The group left Friday afternoon and drove 
eight hours to the Mathers Campground, which 
they called home for the next two nights. 

The next morning, the group awoke to 
a snow-covered oasis of pine trees and cacti 
surrounding the campsite. The group prepared 
light lunches, filled up hydration packs and 
headed to the trail head. 

The students hiked the Bright Angel Trail 
for four hours, stopping occasionally for rest 
and to snack on food they brought for the 
journey. 

Once the students got off the trail and on 
the rim of the canyon, they visited the El Tovar 
Hotel and the various gift shops. 

^)n April 4, the students explored the 
activities available at the Grand Canyon 



A look-out post identified all of the 
unique characteristics of the topography of 
the canyon. 

Afterward, the group members departed 
for Williams, Ariz., where they stayed the 
night in a hotel before returning to CLU the 
next morning. 

The price for this expedition was under 
$100 a person. 

Next year, Intramurals is planning a trip 
to Sequoia National Park in the fall. 



To be put on an interest 

sheet for a camping trip to 

Sequoia National Park, 

call the IM office at 

extension 3546. 



Ojai tournament has ups and downs 



By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 



On Thursday, April 22, the two best sin- 
gles players and doubles teams were selected 
to compete in the 104th Ojai Valley Tennis 
Tournament. Junior Jen Hansen, No. 1 singles 
for the Regals, was one of the players, along 
with Junior Lisa Novajosky, who competed in 
the singles half of the tournament. 

In her first round, Hansen defeated 
Nicole Warm from Sonoma 6-3, 6-3. In her 
next round, Hansen faced Alexandria Muller 
from University of California at Davis and 
was defeated by a score of 6-1, 6-4. 

"I really wanted to go far in the tourna- 



ment, but I made some errors that cost me the 
match," Hansen said. 

Novajosky also had the chance to play in 
the singles draw and faced the No. 1 singles 
player from Occidental, Kelly Hasegawa. A 
score of 7-6, 6-4 defeated Novajosky after a 
tough match. 

In the doubles half of the tournament, 
four SCIAC teams went through to the 
semifinals, including the team of Hansen and 
Rebecca Hunau, who made their way up the 
draw with big wins after losing to the No. 1 
Redlands team of Erin Hiranaga and Jenna 
Umeno by a score of 6-3, 6-3. 

"We played to the best of our ability, but 
on the last match, things just weren't going our 



way, which made us lose the match," Hunau 
said. 

The second team to represent California 
Lutheran University was Novajosky and Blair 
Murphy, who lost in the first round against 
Andrea Montoya and Ashley Strimple from 
Point-Loma Nazarene University by a score 
of 6-2, 6-7, 7-5. 

"We were very close to winning, and I 



wish we could have won, but we are overall 
happy with how we played," Murphy said. 

Head Coach Nancy Garrison was very 
excited about the doubles scores. 

"Ten years ago, we couldn't get past one 
round, and now we have a team making it to 
the semifinals," Garrison said. "We have to be 
in high spirits about how the team has come 
along through these last years." 



Baseball team 
wins two of three 




Photograph by Dan Norton 

The Kingsmen turn a double play, obtaining 
the second and third outs for the inning. 
By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University base- 
ball team pulled off two wins, but lost one, 
against the University of Redlands Bulldogs 
on April 23. 

The Kingsmen traveled to Redlands to 
play the first game of three on Friday. The 
Kingsmen came out victorious against the 
Bulldogs, 10-0. CLU scored three runs in the 
first, fifth and ninth innings and one run in the 



fourth, banging out 1 8 hits. 

"We went out there and played our hard- 
est. Jon Calmes picked really well, and we got 
excited off of that. The day was his, and as 
hitters, we just went out there to back him up," 
senior Ryan Hostetler said. 

Junior Danny Chaparro had four hits. 
Sophomore Christian Hariot was 3-for-3 with 
an RBI and two runs scored. Senior Geoff 
Buchanan went 2-for-4, with a pair of RBIs 
and a run scored. Junior Jon Calmes threw a 
complete game; he struck out three and walked 
one. 

The Kingsmen took on the Bulldogs for 
games two and three, in a doubleheader, on 
Saturday, April 24. The Kingsmen crushed 
the Bulldogs, 10-1, in the first game. 

"We came out and put a really good 
game together. We had really good offense and 
defense," junior Dominick Marci said. 

In the second game of the doubleheader, 
the Kingsmen lost to the Bulldogs, 1-0. The 
point scored by the Bulldogs was at the top of 
the second inning. 

"We failed to execute. We couldn't move 
the runners, and we didn't get the hits that we 
needed to get," sophomore Matt Hirsh said. 

The Kingsmen finished two-for-three for 
the week. 



Collegiate Readership Program 



Have you picked up your 
newspaper 
today? 



IPPS 




USA TODAY 

Ventura County Star 

New York Times 



Monday through Friday only. 

Located in the Student Union, Dining Commons, Pearson 

Library, Soiland Humanities Center and lobbies of Mogen, 

Thompson, Pederson and Mt. Clef Resident Halls. 



Sponsored by: 

Student Life 



A 



Please recycle. 

Thank you for your 

participation. 



Q 



tvaxt* rncuM 




W.$m ^oi-H® 



8 



The Echo 



SPORTS 



April 28, 2004 



Regals' sweep completes season 




Photograph by Kyle Peterson 
Safe at third' A Regal team member dives back to third, realizing the throw from Occidental might beat her home. 

By Scott Flanders Occidental, 8-0, in its final home game of the 

season. 

With the victory, CLU advanced to 18- 
19, 9-7 while Occidental fell to 11-19, 4-12. 



Sports Information 



The California Lutheran University soft- 
ball team defeated its conference opponent. 



The Regals were on top early after they 
scored five runs in the first inning. They added 
three more runs in the fourth inning to extend 
their lead to 8-0. The game was then called 
because of a mercy rule after Occidental failed 
to score in the top of the fifth. 

Sophomore Olivia Chacon pitched all 
five innings for CLU without allowing a run 
and only surrendering two hits. 

With the victory, Chacon now has 10 
wins this season. Junior Marlene Merchain 
went l-for-2 with two RBIs, and freshman 
Prudence Kjontvedt had a single, two RBIs 
and a run scored. 

The contest marked the final home game 
for CLU's three seniors. Carrie Mitchell, 
Emily Otineru and Shannon Teverbaugh each 
put on an impressive performance in their final 
appearance in front of the home crowd. 

Mitchell had three hits, scored two runs, 
drove in a run and stole a base. Otineru had a 
single and scored a run. Teverbaugh had one 



hit, one run scored and two dazzling defensive 
plays at shortstop. 

The Softball team ended its season com- 
pleting a sweep over Occidental again on 
Saturday by winning 7-1 and 10-0. 

The Regals finish the year with a 20-19 
overall record and a 1 1-7 SCI AC mark. 

In the second game, sophomore Gianna 
Regal threw a no-hitter and struck out eight 
batters while walking just one. She helped 
herself at the plate by going 2-for-4 with two 
RBIs and two runs. 

Mitchell had three hits, an RBI and a run. 
while freshman Katy Wilkins had three RBIs. 

In the first game, CLU scored three runs 
in the fourth and added four more in the sixth. 
Mitchell had three hits and Wilkins batted in 
two runs. 

Starter Danielle Everson gave up just 
one-run, on six hits, in five innings of work. 



Kingsmen unable to relive glory 



"Our doubles results 
were very solid results, 
and I am very pleased 
that the players got past 
the first rounds." 

Mike Genette 
Head Coach 

By Sean Ruitenberg 
Staff Writer 

The California Lutheran University 
Kingsmen tennis team began the last week of 
the season playing the Chapman Panthers in 



Thousand Oaks, Calif, on Tuesday, April 20. 
It was a 7-0 win for the squad of Head Coach 
Mike Genette. 

The Kingsmen, who received a national 
ranking of No. 2 1 earlier in the week, defeated 
the Panthers to finish their season. 

Starting the match by winning the 
doubles point, the Kingsmen also dominated 
in the singles portion. Junior J.V. Vallejos, 
playing at No. 1. defeated Brock Heimann, 
5-3, 6-2, to give the second point to the 
team. Senior Junya Hasebe, playing at No. 
3, defeated Justin Jonas, 6-0, 6-3. Sophomore 
Shara Surabi, playing at No. 2, defeated Ryan 
McCormick,6-l,6-3. 

"It felt good to dominate the last match 
of the season. It got us ready for the weekend 



where we really needed to give a good per- 
formance at the Ojai tournament," sophomore 
Karlo Arapovic said. 

The Ojai Valley Invitational tournament 
serves as the national individual qualifiers for 
the west region in Division III. 

The . best performance from the 
Kingsmen was the doubles win by Vallejos 
and Arapovic against the No. 1 doubles seed 
of Brian Murphy and Michael Thoeresz from 
Redlands. 

"We were just so calm and focused, and 
everything went well for us on that match," 
Vallejos said. 

In the singles half of the tournament, 
the player to advance the farthest was senior 
Quinn Caldaron, who won his first round. 



against Jason Evans from Claremont, with a 
score of 6-3, 6-4, placing him in the round of 
16. Caldaron then lost to Kevin Casey, from 
University of California at Santa Cruz, 6-4, 
6-0. 

"1 had a good run this year, but my inju- 
ries prevented me from playing at my highest 
level," Caldaron said. 

"Our doubles results were very solid 
results, and I am very happy that the players 
got past the first rounds. It was disappoint- 
ing to see Quinn lose, but what can you do," 
Genette said. 

The rest of the Kingsmen didn't advance 
past the round of 32 in the singles draw. 

Given that alumnus Amir Marandy, No. I 
player last year for the Kingsmen, won the tour- 
nament, it was a heartbreaking year for CLU. 



Water polo ends season Golf has high hopes 
with well-deserved wins 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



By Ashley Benson 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
women's water polo team took its first SCIAC 
win of the season against California Institute of 
Technology on Wednesday. April 21. 

The Regals set out to play their last game 
of the season against Cal Tech. The team came 
out ready to play and was able to clinch a one- 
point lead, which it held until the end. The 
Regals beat Cal Tech, 8-7. 

"We did well against them. We could have 
done a little bit better, but the important thing is 
that we won," freshman Kayla Schrock said. 

Freshman Danielle Rios led the team in 
goals; she had four. Freshmen Jen Danielson, 
Scarlett Williams, Michele Hernandez and 
Brittany Zubiate each had one goal apiece. 
Schrock had 1 7 saves in the game. 

The team then went on to compete in the 
SCIAC tournament on Saturday and Sunday, 
April 24-25. It took on Pomona-Pitzer, 
University of La Veme and Cal Tech. 

The Regals lost to Pomona-Pitzer, 11-5, 
and to La Veme, 9-4, but were able to beat Cal 
Tech once again, 9-5. 

"We played good water polo. We have 
improved so much, and we are excited about 



that," Danielson said. 

These were the last games of the season 
for the first women's water polo team at CLU. 
The team did better than CLU's first men's 
team; the Regals came away with four wins 
during their season. 

Rios received second place for the most 
goals scored this season; she had 17. Schrock 
also received second place for most goals 
blocked this season; she had 55. The team 
placed seventh overall in SCIAC. 

"We have improved so much this season. 
Many of the coaches from the other teams 
have come up and congratulated us on our 
improvements," Williams said. "We are so 
happy, and we can't wait for next year; we 
think that we could dominate." 



"We played good water 
polo. We have improved 
so much, and we are 
excited about that." 



The Kingsmen finished third and second 
out of eight teams after the first and second 
rounds of the SCIAC Championships, 
respectively. 

The team finished with a score of 295 on 
Thursday, April 22. It was nine strokes behind 
the University of Redlands and one stroke 
ahead of Pomona-Pitzer. Sophomore Peder 
Nyhus completed the par-70 course at 68. 

The Kingsmen shot a 312 on Monday, 
April 19, at Red Hill Country Club in 
Pasadena. The University of La Veme 
finished first with a score of 298, and the 
University of Redlands finished second at 
308. Freshman Christian Colunga had the 
lowest score for the Kingsmen, enough for 



second overall, by finishing the par-72 course 
1-up Nyhus ranked 10th overall at 6-up. 

"For the most part, we played okay, but 
we need to do better tomorrow. We're kind of 
on the borderline to make the national tourna- 
ment, so we need to keep playing well to help 
our cause for a bid," Nyhus said. 

"We knew, going into that day, that we 
needed to finish third or better to help us move 
up in the SCIAC rankings," Head Coach 
Jeff Lindgren said. "We ended up beating 
Claremont by five strokes and Pomona by 16. 
Christian played really well; he shot a 73 and 
was in second place. Peder shot a 68, which 
was 2 under par. That carried our team into 
that second-place finish." 

"We placed where we thought we 
would place," Poyser said. "Thursday gave 
us high hopes for Nationals." 



Jen Danielson 
Freshman 



Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

to work less than 20 minutes from CLU! Spend 

the most rewarding summer of your life outdoors 

working with children! 

You can earn $2800-3500+ 

Call 888-784-CAMP or visit 

www.workatcamn.com